13 Best Wheel Alignment & Balancing Tools

List Updated June 2020

Bestselling Wheel Alignment & Balancing Tools in 2020


KIPA Adjustable Magnetic Gauge Tool Camber Castor Strut Wheel Alignment Tool for Truck Car RV Tire Repair

KIPA Adjustable Magnetic Gauge Tool Camber Castor Strut Wheel Alignment Tool for Truck Car RV Tire Repair
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020
  • This adjustable gauge allows you to return the strut to the original camber position after dismantling and re-assembling the suspension or to check the amount of camber change before re-installing. Measures the Camber and Caster angle on the wheel hub or brake disc. Suitable for accurate checking of the castor and camber angle
  • Wheel Alignment tool
  • Universial Automotive Tool For Wheel Alignment
  • It has a powerful magnet could be easily mounted on all kinds of metal surface.(Note:Please double check and make sure the panel is balance before using.You could screw the button behind the gauge to adjust panel level)
  • The body of gauge is made of high density aluminum and precision level vial, but the mount is made of metal so that please live it away from water, or maybe it will get rusty

Motion Pro Rear Wheel Alignment Tool

Motion Pro Rear Wheel Alignment Tool
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020

Tenhulzen Auto 3300 2-Wheel Alignment System All-in-one Tool (Camber/Caster/Toe Plates)

Tenhulzen Auto 3300 2-Wheel Alignment System All-in-one Tool (Camber/Caster/Toe Plates)
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • Perfect all-in-one tool for car and SUV front end alignments
  • Patent Pending wheel stand-offs provide unparalleled accuracy
  • Camber measurements accurate to within 0.1 degrees
  • Degree toe alignment specs (commonly supplied by OEM's) can be used with the attached degree to inch conversion chart
  • Detailed, step by step video Instructions

SAVEMORE4U18 Car 14.5''/368mm Steering Wheel Holder Stand Tool Wheel Alignment Essential Tool

SAVEMORE4U18 Car 14.5''/368mm Steering Wheel Holder Stand Tool Wheel Alignment Essential Tool
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • To make measurement more accurate.
  • By pressing the locking switch can adjust the height
  • This rack is a simple but must have tool for aligning a vehicle, it has a loaded spring to fit a wide variety of cars, trucks etc.
  • Material: Iron, Plastic
  • Width: 155MM/6.1'' ; Height: 368MM/14.5''

Motion Pro 08-0048 Chain Alignment Tool

Motion Pro 08-0048 Chain Alignment Tool
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • Quick and accurate alignment
  • Tool body clamps squarely to rear sprocket so the alignment rod will indicate sprocket alignment to chain
  • Motion Pro Chain Alignment Tool can be used on motorcycles and ATVs
  • Made in the China

Granit Adjustable Magnetic Gauge Tool Camber Castor Strut Wheel Alignment Tool for Truck Car RV Tire Repair …

Granit Adjustable Magnetic Gauge Tool Camber Castor Strut Wheel Alignment Tool for Truck Car RV Tire Repair …
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020

Orange Cycle Parts Rear Wheel Alignment Tool for Harley Davidson by Motion Pro 08-0368

Orange Cycle Parts Rear Wheel Alignment Tool for Harley Davidson by Motion Pro 08-0368
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • For use on Harley Softail, Sportster, and Dyna
  • Designed to help set rear wheel alignment
  • Fast, accurate, and easy to use
  • Eliminates the need to use a tape measure
  • Proper wheel alignment extends chain / sprocket and belt life

Wheel-Alignment-Toe-In-Toe-Out-Gauge

Wheel-Alignment-Toe-In-Toe-Out-Gauge
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020
  • Check wheel alignment in minutes
  • This tool measures toe-out and toe-in on a simple to read gauge
  • Reads wheel wobble
  • Maximum distance from outside of tire to outside of other tire must be less than 81"

Front End Steering Wheel Alignment Level Indicator Tester Holder Tool

Front End Steering Wheel Alignment Level Indicator Tester Holder Tool
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • The steering wheel level is a sturdy and simple tool used to assure a level steering wheel
  • The tool is easily attached to the steering wheel at the beginning of the alignment procedure.
  • It is spring-loaded for automatic centering and self-retaining.

Hanperal Universal Magnetic Gauge Tool for Car/Truck Camber/Castor Strut Wheel Alignment

Hanperal Universal Magnetic Gauge Tool for Car/Truck Camber/Castor Strut Wheel Alignment
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • Easy to read and convenient to operate
  • There are super suction, two positioning blisters
  • Suitable for accurate checking of the castor and camber angle
  • Has a simple leveling adjustment from -5 degrees to 5 degrees
  • It's allows you to return the strut to the original camber position after dismantling and re-assembling

Goplus Pro Portable Hubs Wheel Balancer W/Bubble Level Heavy Duty Rim Tire Cars Truck

Goplus Pro Portable Hubs Wheel Balancer W/Bubble Level Heavy Duty Rim Tire Cars Truck
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020

Pro System DIY Wheel Alignment Set up for BOTH Sides QuickSlide System w/Case Portable Wheel Alignment

Pro System DIY Wheel Alignment Set up for BOTH Sides QuickSlide System w/Case Portable Wheel Alignment
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020

E-Z Red EZLINE Laser Wheel Alignment Tool

E-Z Red EZLINE Laser Wheel Alignment Tool
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020
  • All measurements can be taken in under 10 minutes
  • E-Z precise axle and wheel alignment
  • For heavy trucks and all types of trailers
  • Compact design, easy transport and toolbox storage
  • Multipurpose measurement capabilities

Basics of Wheel Alignment: Steering, Suspension, and Tires Oh My!

Every passenger vehicle on the road today has alignment measurements, but most of us know nothing about them or what to do if there is a problem. I'm going to outline some commonly used terms, basic concepts, and how you can tell if your alignment is out.

A wheel alignment is the term used to describe what angle a vehicles wheels sit at in relation to the car and ground. Each vehicle has different specifications and may require additional procedures to correct misalignment. Wheel alignment is made up of three different measurements toe, camber, and caster. The first measurement is the toe which would make the tires sit duck footed if they're toed out or pigeon toed they're toed in. Having a toe problem essentially makes a car drag its tires down the road sideways. This will increase rolling resistance which increases gas consumption. Toe problems cause tires to feather, meaning the blocks will get little teeth and wear at awkward angles. Mild wear will usually correct it's self after the alignment is corrected, but extreme wear will cause a hum or bumpy ride.

The second measurement is the camber. Positive camber will make the top of the wheels sit out on the axle. Negative will make them lean in like the car's knees are knocking. The camber is often unadjustable on front wheel drive vehicles without replacing worn parts. The car's camber is altered by bends in the frame or worn or loose parts such as the shocks and struts. Therefore, if the camber is out there is usually something mechanically wrong or there are parts in need of maintenance. After market kits are made to solve some of these problems, but will take additional time in the shop to install. Camber problems will cause tire wear to slope from one side to the other. If left unattended it will wear off either the inside or the outside of the tire much quicker than the rest resulting in a costly tire bill.

Third, is the caster, which affects the steering pivot point. The caster being out may cause the car to wander, pull, or kick over bumps. It's measurements mostly depends on the frame and ball joints. Simple wrench turns can't fix many caster problems, but should still be measured when you pay for an alignment. A good shop will always provide the numbers when you leave, not just "toe and go." Toe and go is industry slang for fixing toe problems, which are the most evident to the driver, and charging for a whole alignment. Most of the time when a vehicle needs alignment it will only need toe adjustments anyway, but all measurements should be checked to insure there are no further problems with the vehicle.

Even though you now know the three basic measurements of a vehicle alignment there's one more problem. Most abnormalities in the alignment probably won't be visible with the naked eye. The measurements involved are fractions of an inch, but even that small amount will affect the performance of a vehicle. Example: if the alignment is out just 0.34 degrees a car driven 12,000 a year will have dragged its tire sideways 68 miles by the end of the year. If you suspect your alignment is out know how alone won't help you out of this fix. A proper alignment needs to be done in a repair shop on a specially designed rack. The mechanic will hook the car up to sensors and a computer to read the tiny measurements.

So what are the warning signs my alignment may be out?

-Pulling to the left or right after you let go of the steering wheel on a straight and level road. This is not a surefire way to diagnose misalignment for several reasons and should not be used as conclusive evidence. No road is perfectly level, most are sloped to the shoulder to prevent water gathering on the road. Plus, not all alignment problems cause pull. Also, pull can be caused by previous tire wear, low or uneven air pressure in the front tires or worn steering components. Before making any conclusions fill both tires to specification while they are cool. Then ask yourself if the car pulls when braking. If the problem occurs only during braking then your calipers may be stuck or other brake problems could be to blame.

-Tire wear. Given proper care the tires should wear smooth across. Most passenger tires start out with 10/32" tread and should be retired at 4/32". You can buy a gauger at any auto store for a few bucks. If the tires wear more on the inside, outside, or certain tires more than others it possible you have an alignment problem. Tire wear can also be caused by poor inflation, being out of balance, out of round, or not properly rotated, so this test is most effective on tires that have otherwise been properly maintained. Feathering is an obvious sign the alignment is out. Keep in mind by the time the tires show wear you already have a bad problem on your hands even if you felt the car was steering and tracking correctly.

-Bumping or wandering. If you are having these problems chances are the car has worn suspension parts which will need to be replaced and an alignment performed. If a car is experiencing these problems fix it immediately since they cause poor steering conditions and could lead to an accident or mechanical failure while driving. Problems with suspension components, like shocks, will often cause patch wear on your tires. But, this wear pattern can also be caused by a tire being out of balance.

My car is vibrating at 60 miles per hour, is that my alignment?

Usually not. Vibrating while driving at high speeds is usually caused by a tire being out of balance. If it is felt strongly in the steering wheel it is most likely a front tire. If it is felt in the seat it maybe in the rear. Occasionally this vibrating can be caused by a bent rim, out-of-round tire, wheel bearings, or loose parts. Most people will notice balance related vibrations after they rotate their tires since out of balance tires placed in the rear are less likely to affect ride. After the rotation those tires are in front and cause a lot more chaos.

How did my car get out of alignment?

Driving! Vehicle manufacturers recommend you at least check your alignment every 6-12,000 miles. Vibrations from driving, hitting bumps or potholes (or curbs if you're talented like me), and vehicle load all loosen the suspension components that govern you alignment. Also, all suspension parts wear over time and need adjusting to compensate for the wear. When these suspension parts are replaced you will be required to align the vehicle to accommodate the new part as well. The alignment should be included in the estimates for this type of work.

What exactly goes on in the shop when an alignment is performed?

After you OK the work your car should be taken on a test drive. The mechanic will be looking for pulling, hopping, and wandering. They may also notice a noise or reactions the vehicle has to being driven that signal other problems or worn suspension parts. They will also note if the steering wheel is straight while driving in a straight line.

Before any work is done they will check for unusual tire wear. New tires may be recommended or the best tires may be moved to the front since uneven wear will cause pull. They will also inflate all tires properly. Recheck the tire pressure later when the tires are cool though since they are usually hot from being driven on when you get to the shop.

Next the vehicle will be driven onto the alignment rack. You may notice rotating plates on both sides at the front. These are locked into place until the front tires are over them. After they're released they will allow the front tires to pivot with ease as the mechanic tests different angles and makes adjustments. If the car has wheel covers they will be removed, once the mechanic has four bare rims in front of them they will attach sensors to every wheel. These sensors use tension to stay in place. Each one has many levels and sensor heads and reports information back to a computer nearby. After the vehicle is off the ground the mechanic should immediately check for worn parts. This usually involves vigorously shaking each wheel and some rods under the car.

There are two types of basic alignments. Thrust angle, when only front end adjustments are available on a vehicle. During a thrust angle alignment the front tires will be set to the same angle as the rear. Then there is a four wheel alignment. A four wheel alignment is exactly what it sounds like. If the car is getting a four wheel alignment the mechanic should start the adjustments with the rear toe. This is mostly wrench turns while looking at the computer screen until it is right. After the rear is set the mechanic should turn on the car and turn the wheel side to side. This is to perform the caster sweep and release the load on the power steering valve. Then a wedge like contraption will be placed between the bottom of the steering wheel and the seat to hold it center. After adjustments are made to all four wheels the car should be turned on again and the steering wheel moved side to side a few times. This is to make sure the power steering hasn't been loaded again. After the results are printed, the sensors removed, and the steering wheel released the car should be taken for another test drive. If all goes well the wheel covers can be replaced, payments made, and you can drive off in a perfectly aligned vehicle. If for any reason you aren't happy you should return as soon as possible since most shops guarantee their work for 6,000 miles.

When you leave you should have a before and after spec sheet and an invoice stating your warranty.

Why are there so many different prices between shops?

First thing you need to remember is you get what you pay for. But, the three main variables in price are 1. Quality 2. Alignment type 3. Warranty. Quality could be affected by the types of adjustments the mechanic actually makes or the shop you choose. Mom and Pop repair shops often offer great prices, but may not have specialty equipment for your model car. Also, they are notorious for toe and go tactics. Alignment type is whether your vehicle got a thrust angle alignment or the more detailed four wheel alignment. The third factor is warranty. Shops used to only cover their workmanship or give you a 6,000 miles/6 month warranty. Now, many repair shops are willing to provide extended contracts allowing you to come back multiple times for one price paid up front. These contracts usually are for a predetermined amount of time and have nothing to do mileage or frequency of visits. These are a good investment if you plan on keeping up with your alignment as recommended.

Thank you, Good luck, and The End.