12 Best Waves & Wave Mechanics

List Updated July 2020

Bestselling Waves & Wave Mechanics in 2020


Relativistic Wave Mechanics (Dover Books on Physics)

Relativistic Wave Mechanics (Dover Books on Physics)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

Wave Mechanics: The Commonwealth and International Library: Selected Readings in Physics

Wave Mechanics: The Commonwealth and International Library: Selected Readings in Physics
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020

The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks, and Giants of the Ocean

The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks, and Giants of the Ocean
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Water Wave Mechanics for Engineers & Scientists (Advanced Series on Ocean Engineering-Vol2) (v. 2)

Water Wave Mechanics for Engineers & Scientists (Advanced Series on Ocean Engineering-Vol2) (v. 2)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

An Introduction to the Study of Wave Mechanics

An Introduction to the Study of Wave Mechanics
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

Pauli Lectures on Physics, Vol. 5: Wave Mechanics

Pauli Lectures on Physics, Vol. 5: Wave Mechanics
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020

Fluid Mechanics and Thermo-Acoustic Waves

Fluid Mechanics and Thermo-Acoustic Waves
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

Elementary Wave Mechanics, With Applications to Quantum Chemistry

Elementary Wave Mechanics, With Applications to Quantum Chemistry
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

Waves and Oscillations: A Prelude to Quantum Mechanics

Waves and Oscillations: A Prelude to Quantum Mechanics
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020

Wave mechanics;: Elementary theory

Wave mechanics;: Elementary theory
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

Reality Is Not What It Seems: The Journey to Quantum Gravity

Reality Is Not What It Seems: The Journey to Quantum Gravity
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020
  • Riverhead Books

Wave Propagation in Elastic Solids, Volume 16 (North-Holland Series in Applied Mathematics and Mechanics)

Wave Propagation in Elastic Solids, Volume 16 (North-Holland Series in Applied Mathematics and Mechanics)
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Exoplanets May Have Not-So-Green Foliage

Astrobiologists have theorized that planets that could harbor life could have different color plants, such as red and blue, due to the different light waves that hits the planets.

Astrobiologists at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Sciences in New York have come to realize that they may have been looking for the wrong indicators of life on a planet by assuming that the plants would be green. Here on earth, the plants are green because of the wavelength of light that they reflect. Because our sun emits large amounts of red light, the most abundant here on earth, and blue light, the most energetic form here on earth, plants have evolved their processes of photosynthesis, and thus their pigments, to these wavelengths. Because plants here don't absorb green light quite as well as they do red and blue, they reflect the green wavelength.

But plants on other planets would evolve accordingly to the wavelengths they receive. For example, a planet that orbits a star brighter than the sun will receive much more blue and ultraviolet light, since larger stars emit more of this type of light. As such, the plants will develop a photosynthetic method that absorbs mostly blue, and probably green, light. In turn, they will reflect the more reddish wavelengths, thus looking redder to the human eye. In fact, these plants will probably exhibit autumnal colors almost the entire growing season. In autumn, they will look green, a sort of reversal of earth.

However, planets that orbit stars that are dimmer than our sun will have a more interesting coloring. Smaller stars like red dwarfs contain only 10% to 50% the mass of our sun, and comprise nearly 85% of the stars in the Milky Way, meaning that this type of foliage may be more probable. But, red dwarfs emit a very high amount of infrared light and a very little amount of ultraviolet light. Plants would adapt accordingly, absorbing most of the infrared. But, these plants would probably also benefit from sopping up some of the visible light too. Since they will be reflecting very little visible light, or at least the darker end of the visible spectrum, the foliage would look very dark, quite possibly even black!

Another scenario would be possible on these red dwarf planets which would involve exotic forms of algae. Normal plants may not be able to produce enough oxygen from the infrared light in order to block the dangerous ultraviolet light streaming in from the star in the form of solar flares. These flares are only prevalent in the first part of a red dwarf's life. Nonetheless, algae would have to produce the vast amount of oxygen. But, algae are very susceptible to ultraviolet rays, meaning that they couldn't just sit on the surface of the water all day. Instead, researchers think that a bizarre form of algae may exist that would be able to recognize through sensors the amount of ultraviolet light streaming in via solar flares. When the ultraviolet light was low, the algae would float. When the ultraviolet rays were high, the plants would somehow sink to a safe depth until it is safe to return to the surface. After the red dwarf passed its initial flare phase, other plant life would be able to emerge, since an oxygen layer wouldn't be needed to protect against the little amount of ultraviolet light that the dwarf produces.