13 Best U.S. Horror Fiction

List Updated July 2020

Bestselling U.S. Horror Fiction in 2020


It

It
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

Sharp Objects

Sharp Objects
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • Sharp Objects

Sleeping Beauties: A Novel

Sleeping Beauties: A Novel
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020

Requiem (After The Purge: Vendetta, Book 1)

Requiem (After The Purge: Vendetta, Book 1)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020

Ramses the Damned: The Passion of Cleopatra

Ramses the Damned: The Passion of Cleopatra
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

The Silver Eyes (Five Nights At Freddy's #1)

The Silver Eyes (Five Nights At Freddy's #1)
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • Scholastic Inc

The Rules of Magic: A Novel (The Practical Magic Series Book 1)

The Rules of Magic: A Novel (The Practical Magic Series Book 1)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

On Writing: 10th Anniversary Edition: A Memoir of the Craft

On Writing: 10th Anniversary Edition: A Memoir of the Craft
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020
  • writing advice from horror-meistro Stephen King, a fine softcover

What the Hell Did I Just Read: A Novel of Cosmic Horror (John Dies at the End Book 3)

What the Hell Did I Just Read: A Novel of Cosmic Horror (John Dies at the End Book 3)
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020

The Last Kids on Earth

The Last Kids on Earth
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • Viking Children s Books

A Head Full of Ghosts: A Novel

A Head Full of Ghosts: A Novel
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020

Encyclopedia Brown Box Set (4 Books)

Encyclopedia Brown Box Set (4 Books)
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020
  • Title: Encyclopedia Brown - by Donald J
  • Sobol

Stories of Your Life and Others

Stories of Your Life and Others
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020

Dean Koontz and Stephen King: Two Authors, Two Styles, One Chill

A comparison of Stephen King and Dean Koontz, two very popular Suspense and Horror fiction authors.

However, they are both very different writers, both in style and plot. A Stephen King novel can rarely be truly compared to a Dean Koontz novel. But they both affect me. How are they so different, and yet so alike? That is the question I seek to answer with this article.

One of the differences between Stephen King and Dean Koontz is the subject matter their plots tend to revolve around. Dean Koontz has many books that involve genetic manipulation and enhancement. He also deals with the 'other side' in a lot of his books, with things like ghosts, and spirits.

Part of what can be so chilling about his books is his revelations of the human soul. In his books, the greatest of evils, the most horrifying of monsters, is the dark side of the soul that lies in every human being. Whether it is the minds of the people who invented and carried out genetic experiments, and accidentally created a monster, or people with great powers, who give in to their dark side, the true enemy, the one behind it all, is that dark voice in the mind, the devil on your shoulder.

Stephen King dwells less on what is inside, and more on what is outside. His monsters are from the other side of the galaxy, from another dimension, or are simply there, sometimes unexplained, sometimes known, but always physical. His creatures and enemies are the fears of the inner child in all of us, the creature under the bed, or the monster in the closet. He captures this, not only in the look and feel of the monsters, but also in the unbelievable feel of it all, just like the child's futile attempts to convince his parents of the monsters existence.

Dean Koontz tends to have happy endings to his stories. That is not to say that they are sappy, or overly dramatic. The characters have been affected, changed, maybe even permanently scarred by their experiences, but they end up happy. Each one is well written, too, so you never feel as if the story has been cut off. Stephen King, however, is more enigmatic with his endings. They are happy sometimes, bittersweet at others. Some have horridly evil endings for the characters, while some are much more enigmatic, and mysterious. And some, he simply leaves to the reader to decipher.

Dean Koontz and Stephen King are both authors of supernatural stories. But for the most part, that is where their similarity ends. Dean Koontz deals with the fear of what is within, while Stephen King shows you the horror of what is without. But there is another, very important similarity they share. They both can chill you to the bone, and rivet you to your chair.

And they will both make you start looking closely at the shadows.

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