13 Best Teen & Young Adult Social Science Books

List Updated May 2020

Bestselling Teen & Young Adult Social Science Books in 2020


All Rights Reserved: A New YA Science Fiction Book (Word$ 1)

All Rights Reserved: A New YA Science Fiction Book (Word$ 1)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

The Anxiety Workbook for Teens: Activities to Help You Deal with Anxiety and Worry (Instant Help Solutions)

The Anxiety Workbook for Teens: Activities to Help You Deal with Anxiety and Worry (Instant Help Solutions)
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020

Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World

Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • Women in Science 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World

The 7 Habits Of Highly Effective Teens

The 7 Habits Of Highly Effective Teens
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020

Otherworld (Last Reality Book 1)

Otherworld (Last Reality Book 1)
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

Greyson Gray: Camp Legend (The Greyson Gray Series) (Volume 1)

Greyson Gray: Camp Legend (The Greyson Gray Series) (Volume 1)
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

The Giver Movie Tie-In Edition (Giver Quartet Book 1)

The Giver Movie Tie-In Edition (Giver Quartet Book 1)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

Don't Let Your Emotions Run Your Life for Teens: Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills for Helping You Manage Mood Swings, Control Angry Outbursts, and (Instant Help Book for Teens)

Don't Let Your Emotions Run Your Life for Teens: Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills for Helping You Manage Mood Swings, Control Angry Outbursts, and (Instant Help Book for Teens)
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

The 6 Most Important Decisions You'll Ever Make: A Guide for Teens

The 6 Most Important Decisions You'll Ever Make: A Guide for Teens
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • The 6 Most Important Decisions You ll Ever Make A Guide for Teens

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone: Illustrated [Kindle in Motion] (Illustrated Harry Potter Book 1)

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone: Illustrated [Kindle in Motion] (Illustrated Harry Potter Book 1)
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

The Legacy Chronicles: Out of the Ashes

The Legacy Chronicles: Out of the Ashes
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020

Feeder: Young Adult Science Fiction (Book 1, Feeder Series)

Feeder: Young Adult Science Fiction (Book 1, Feeder Series)
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020

Scythe (Arc of a Scythe Book 1)

Scythe (Arc of a Scythe Book 1)
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020

A Summer Reading List for Book Lovers

It's time for my Second Annual Summer Reading List that anyone can stick to. As before, I have included fourteen books, one for each week between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Some are recent, some are old, and some you should have read in college but didn't.

The list leaves off current best sellers for the simple reason that many of them are not yet out in paperback. Most, if not all, of these can be obtained at your local library; it's important to save where we can in an era of $4 gasoline. And you may notice a few repeats from last year...some were just too good to remove.

1. The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. This book has come the closest in 20 years to replacing The Razor's Edge (see #12 below) as my all time favorite. It touches on such diverse topics as forbidden love, the Spanish Civil War, and the innate need we have for books. It layers all of these things on the mystery of why a disfigured man is burning all of the copies of books by Julian Carax, an obscure author whose novel, The Shadow of the Wind, was discovered by main character Daniel Sempere when he was 10. But be sure you have a lot of free time when you start this one; I stayed up all night reading the last 250 pages.

2. The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop by Lewis Buzbee. The San Francisco author who started as a clerk at a San Jose bookstore during his freshman year of college and continued in either book selling or as a publisher's sales rep for the next thirty years gives us a glimpse into the world of the bookseller that few knew existed. The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop takes the reader on a fascinating journey from the first papyrus scrolls and the great Library of Alexandria through the e-book and mega-chains like Borders and Barnes and Noble. Mixed throughout this 3000-year odyssey are Buzbee's own journey, his love of books, and some laugh-out-loud moments. By the time you finish the book, you will definitely want to sneak a peek into the back room of your local bookstore, hoping to see some of the things he has seen.

3. God's Smuggler by Brother Andrew. This is one of the classics of the Christian biography/missionary genre, and the setting (Cold War-era Eastern Europe) is worthy of Ludlum. More than once I had to stop and remind myself that this was non-fiction, which is one of the reasons it makes my summer reading list.

4. The Cabinet of Curiosities by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child. There really aren't any sub-par Lincoln/Child books, especially ones that feature FBI Special Agent Pendergast, but for whatever reason I liked this one the best. This is a great novel on its own, and a crucial introduction before starting the Brimstone trilogy.

5. Heart Shaped Box by Joe Hill. Unless you've been hibernating for the past year or so, you know that Joe Hill's real name is Joe Hill King, son of Stephen King, and if his first novel is any indication, he should have a run of success that will eventually rival his dad's. Heart Shaped Box is a great read, and much more than your typical horror novel. The characters are well written and three-dimensional, the pace picks up with each page, and in the correct places it is really, really scary.

6. Booked to Die by John Dunning. The first novel in Dunning's Bookman series is a minor classic, especially if you're a fan of the biblio-mystery genre or a book collector. It's the story of a Denver cop-turned-rare book dealer Cliff Janeway, and it will teach you a lot about the book trade while taking you on a mystery thrill-ride at the same time.

7. Flabbergasted by Ray Blackston. The first installment of a comic trilogy set in South Carolina; this may be the perfect beach novel. The characters are vividly drawn, and definitely grow on you, as narrator Jay Jarvis and his friends navigate the Southern singles scene by, of all things, visiting various church singles classes. It's good enough to warrant going immediately on to the sequel...

8. A Delirious Summer by Ray Blackston.The premise is similar to Flabbergasted, but with a twist. The narrator this time is Neil Rucker, a missionary on furlough for the summer looking for a wife in the wilds of Greenville, South Carolina. In the end, maybe a more dangerous place than the Amazon jungle.

9. The Poe Shadow by Matthew Pearl. The story of young Baltimore attorney who makes it his personal cause to defend the recently-deceased Poe's reputation from the rumors that he drank himself to death. Pearl weaves a gripping fictional story around historical fact, much of it newly discovered as he was researching this book.

10. Cadillac Jack by James McMurtry. Not your typical McMurtry novel, Cadillac Jack follows the exploits of Cadillac Jack, an antiques "scout" always on the lookout for the next big score. We get an amusing look at Washington, DC in the early 1980's as well as a bygone era before Antiques Roadshow, when you could still hope to find a Ming vase for $2 at a flea market in Tulsa.

11. A Beautiful Blue Death by Charles Finch. This is Finch's first novel, and the first in a series that will feature protagonist Charles Lennox. It is a fine mystery that has received nothing but positive reviews. It is set in Victorian England, and Finch is particularly adept at conveying his setting in such a way that we feel like we're actually there. Lennox is brilliant, but not so much so that we don't have doubts about his ability to put all the clues together. This should be a very good series.

12. The Razor's Edge by W. Somerset Maugham. Maugham's finest novel, one of the best ever written, and one I'm currently re-reading for the 18th time. It's become an annual ritual for me, and each time I get something new out of it. Larry Darrell's search for meaning after WWI is just as timely and relevant to our world today as it was when Maugham wrote it over 60 years ago.

13. The Wishbones by Tom Perrotta. Perrotta's first novel, and much more fun to read than his more acclaimed Little Children. The main character, Dave Raymond, is a courier by day and a guitarist in a really good New Jersey wedding band on weekends, and we ride along with Dave as he confronts the idea of "growing up." It will make you wish you hadn't given up on those guitar lessons in 8th grade.

14. The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas. Forget all of the movies you've seen. If this is your first time reading the novel, you are in for a treat. The mix of fiction with French history takes you back to another place and time, and D'Artagnan, Porthos, Athos, and Aramis provide more rollicking adventure than Clive Cussler and Tom Clancy combined.

Related Bestselling Lists That You Might Like