13 Best Teen & Young Adult Grammar

List Updated July 2020

Bestselling Teen & Young Adult Grammar in 2020


Gritty Spanish Beginnings: Fun, Short and Entertaining Stories For Beginner - Intermediate Spanish Learners - Awesome Side by Side Reading To Help Master Spanish Verbs And Other Spanish Grammar

Gritty Spanish Beginnings:  Fun, Short and Entertaining Stories For Beginner - Intermediate Spanish Learners - Awesome Side by Side Reading To Help Master Spanish Verbs And Other Spanish Grammar
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

Grammar Girl Presents the Ultimate Writing Guide for Students (Quick & Dirty Tips)

Grammar Girl Presents the Ultimate Writing Guide for Students (Quick & Dirty Tips)
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • St Martin s Griffin

Spectrum Language Arts, Grade 7

Spectrum Language Arts, Grade 7
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • Sold As 1 EA.

Grammar Workbook: Grammar Grades 7-8

Grammar Workbook: Grammar Grades 7-8
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • Grammar Workbook Grammar Grades 7 8

Wordly Wise 3000 Book 5: Systematic Academic Vocabulary Development

Wordly Wise 3000 Book 5: Systematic Academic Vocabulary Development
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

Spectrum Language Arts, Grade 8

Spectrum Language Arts, Grade 8
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • Sold As 1 EA.

Spectrum Writing, Grade 7

Spectrum Writing, Grade 7
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • Book, Workbook, Writing Book
  • Writing - Grammar

Spectrum Writing, Grade 8

Spectrum Writing, Grade 8
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020
  • Book, Workbook, Writing Book
  • Writing - Grammar

SAT and ACT Grammar Workbook (Barron's)

SAT and ACT Grammar Workbook (Barron's)
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • Barron s Educational Series

Easy Grammar Plus

Easy Grammar Plus
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Grammar for the Well-Trained Mind: Purple Workbook: A Complete Course for Young Writers, Aspiring Rhetoricians, and Anyone Else Who Needs to ... Works (Grammar for the Well-Trained Mind)

Grammar for the Well-Trained Mind: Purple Workbook: A Complete Course for Young Writers, Aspiring Rhetoricians,  and Anyone Else Who Needs to ... Works (Grammar for the Well-Trained Mind)
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020

Grammar, Grades 7-8, 100 Reproducible Activities

Grammar, Grades 7-8, 100 Reproducible Activities
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020
  • Grades - 7,8
  • Weight - 0.74
  • Depth - 10.90
  • Width - 8.40
  • Height - 0.37

The Young Adult's Guide to Flawless Writing: Essential Explanations, Examples, and Exercises: Essential Explanations, Examples, and Exercises

The Young Adult's Guide to Flawless Writing: Essential Explanations, Examples, and Exercises: Essential Explanations, Examples, and Exercises
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020

7 Quick, Easy Grammar Tips to Improve Your Writing

Use these 7 quick and easy grammar tips to improve your writing. I and me, who and whom, its and it's, your and you're, there, their, and they're, and apostrophes all demystified.

Grammar tip #1: I vs. Me

This is one of the most common grammar errors around, yet one of the easiest to fix. Take a look at the following sentences:

Me and Jane went shopping yesterday.

Steve went to the golf course with Edward and I.

Sometimes Angela and me just like a little quiet time.

All of these sentences are incorrect. The easiest way to fix I/me mistakes is to get rid of the other people in the sentence:

Me went shopping yesterday.

Steve went to the golf course with I.

Sometimes me just like a little quiet time.

By isolating your I or me this way, it is suddenly obvious when you're talking like Tarzan. So when in doubt, do the Tarzan Test!

Grammar tip #2: Who vs. Whom

I had a professor who would just always say whom, thinking he could avoid mistakes. Unfortunately, he just sounded goofy most of the time. The more common error is to say who all the time, and this one is such a habit with us that it can be hard to spot mistakes. But with a little practice, it's easy to use who and whom correctly.

Whom is responsible for this?

Who should I talk to about my insurance?

Who does this belong to?

Again, all these sentences are wrong. The key to good who and whom grammar is to identify the subject of the sentence. (The subject is the actor in the sentence, the one that's doing something). If you're dealing with a subject, use who. Otherwise, it's whom. Here are the corrected sentences:

Who is responsible for this? (Who is the subject because it's doing the "is-ing.")

Whom should I talk to about my insurance? (I is the subject, because I is doing the talking. So, we can't use who here.)

Whom does this belong to? (This is the subject since this is doing the belonging. Again, that means we can't use who.)

Grammar tip #3: Your vs. You're

This grammar mistake is all over the Internet. Thankfully, it's quite easy to fix.

Your really getting on my nerves with this grammar article!

Come get you're dinner.

These sentences are wrong. But how can you tell? Just remember that you're is short for "you are," and you'll never make this mistake again. Here are the corrected sentences, with "you are" in parentheses so you can see if it makes sense:

You're (you are) really getting on my nerves with this grammar article!

Come get your (you are) dinner.

You're not dinner! You're a blossoming grammar expert!

Grammar tip #5: Its vs. It's

This one similar to your and you're. In this case, just remember that it's, with an apostrophe, is short for "it is."

It's (it is) time to go.

My stupid dog is chasing its (it is) tail.

Grammar tip #6: There, Their, and They're

This one is a constant struggle for many among us. So what's the difference between these words, anyway?

They're = They are

They're going to pay for the damage.

There = Pointing out

Towels are over there in the closet.

Their = Ownership

Have you seen their new truck?

Grammar tip #7: Apostrophe Hell

I've saved the best for last. People love to put apostrophes where they don't belong, especially when plurals are involved. Apostrophes can be tricky, but there is method to the madness. Generally speaking, apostrophes are only used to shorten words or show ownership. Except in certain circumstances, apostrophes are never used for plurals.

Look at all these ferret's!

Wrong, wrong, wrong. No apostrophe is needed on ordinary plural words. But what about the exceptions?

1890's, CD's, A's, B's, C's

When dealing with numerals, abbreviations, and letters, apostrophes can be used to show plurality. Otherwise, don't even think about using an apostrophe! Let's move on to ownership and possession.

What's the difference between these two sentences?

Here are my brother's knives.

Here are my brothers' knives.

In the first sentence the apostrophe comes before the s, and in the second sentence it comes after. But this tiny change alters the meaning of the sentence.

Here's the difference. In the first sentence, you have one brother. In the second sentence, you have several brothers. In other words, the placement of the apostrophe tells us whether we're dealing with a singular or a plural. Easy enough, right? Now you have no more excuses to make apostrophe mistakes!

Conclusion

Master these seven easy grammar tips, and your writing will be much improved. Readers will be more likely to read your content, and you will appear more intelligent, professional, and credible -- and these are things that we all strive for in our writing.

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