13 Best Teen & Young Adult Experiments & Projects

List Updated June 2020

Bestselling Teen & Young Adult Experiments & Projects in 2020


Programming Arduino: Getting Started with Sketches, Second Edition (Tab)

Programming Arduino: Getting Started with Sketches, Second Edition (Tab)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020
  • McGraw-Hill Education Tab

The Big Book of Makerspace Projects: Inspiring Makers to Experiment, Create, and Learn

The Big Book of Makerspace Projects: Inspiring Makers to Experiment, Create, and Learn
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • The Big Book of Makerspace Projects Inspiring Makers to Experiment Create and Learn

20 Makey Makey Projects for the Evil Genius

20 Makey Makey Projects for the Evil Genius
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • MCGRAW-HILL Professional

DIY Drones for the Evil Genius: Design, Build, and Customize Your Own Drones

DIY Drones for the Evil Genius: Design, Build, and Customize Your Own Drones
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • McGraw-Hill Education TAB

Naked Eggs and Flying Potatoes: Unforgettable Experiments That Make Science Fun (Steve Spangler Science)

Naked Eggs and Flying Potatoes: Unforgettable Experiments That Make Science Fun (Steve Spangler Science)
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • Greenleaf Book Group

Make: Rockets: Down-to-Earth Rocket Science

Make: Rockets: Down-to-Earth Rocket Science
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020

Science Experiments You Can Eat: Revised Edition

Science Experiments You Can Eat: Revised Edition
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • HarperCollins

Janice VanCleave's Biology For Every Kid: 101 Easy Experiments That Really Work

Janice VanCleave's Biology For Every Kid: 101 Easy Experiments That Really Work
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

Human Anatomy in Full Color (Dover Children's Science Books)

Human Anatomy in Full Color (Dover Children's Science Books)
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020

The Book of Potentially Catastrophic Science: 50 Experiments for Daring Young Scientists (Irresponsible Science)

The Book of Potentially Catastrophic Science: 50 Experiments for Daring Young Scientists (Irresponsible Science)
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • Books

Planetary Science: Explore New Frontiers (Inquire & Investigate)

Planetary Science: Explore New Frontiers (Inquire & Investigate)
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020

Genetics: Breaking the Code of Your DNA (Inquire and Investigate)

Genetics: Breaking the Code of Your DNA (Inquire and Investigate)
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020

Chemistry: Investigate the Matter that Makes Up Your World (Inquire and Investigate)

Chemistry: Investigate the Matter that Makes Up Your World (Inquire and Investigate)
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020

Facebook Identities: Who is Really Creeping on You?

The results of a social experiment I conducted using the popular Facebook website.

I decided to conduct a social experiment of my own this past week to see for myself just how easy it is to pose as someone else and to observe what kinds of people let me into their online life. I created a Facebook pretending to be a 20-year-old college girl who loved the party lifestyle. Although I had to invent a new e-mail account to make the Facebook page, it was not too hard to "prove" to Facebook that I existed and was who I said I was. Next, I added the picture of four girls in bikinis with no way to distinguish faces and I was all set for my online "life."

I requested anyone and everyone Facebook so helpfully suggested to me in the top right corner of my page, and pretty soon the acceptance notifications and friend requests made to me came rolling in. Mainly guys but some girls too. I was amazed by the complete faith each one of these people had in the little information box where I wrote what college I "attended." A few people asked me where I knew them from but a quick perusal around their own page and I had all the information I needed to claim I knew them from some party we had both attended or even just a random place on campus where I would have met them in a sober state.

I couldn't believe how many people just simply added a girl they did not know without even a distinguishable photo. Within just a few hours I had successfully obtained 53 friends and people had begun chatting with me as though they knew me.

One commented on my wall about my plans for the summer, another guy messaged me about how fabulous I looked in my picture (were we looking at the same one?) and another utilized the Facebook chat option to ask why he hadn't seen me around in a while. I wanted to yell at them, "THIS GIRL DOES NOT EXIST!!!"

People reading the newspaper or watching the T.V. are quick to judge those in the horrific stories they are hearing about, saying to themselves, "oh, that would never happen to me." But it does, and it can. In a matter of hours I had complete access to 53 people's online lives. My social experiment was a success, but what does that say about that state of the online community?

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