13 Best Teen & Young Adult Computer Software Books

List Updated July 2020

Bestselling Teen & Young Adult Computer Software Books in 2020


Python Crash Course: A Hands-On, Project-Based Introduction to Programming

Python Crash Course: A Hands-On, Project-Based Introduction to Programming
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020
  • No Starch Press

Programming Arduino: Getting Started with Sketches, Second Edition (Tab)

Programming Arduino: Getting Started with Sketches, Second Edition (Tab)
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • McGraw-Hill Education Tab

Hello World!: Computer Programming for Kids and Other Beginners

Hello World!: Computer Programming for Kids and Other Beginners
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

20 Makey Makey Projects for the Evil Genius

20 Makey Makey Projects for the Evil Genius
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • MCGRAW-HILL Professional

The Big Book of Makerspace Projects: Inspiring Makers to Experiment, Create, and Learn

The Big Book of Makerspace Projects: Inspiring Makers to Experiment, Create, and Learn
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • The Big Book of Makerspace Projects Inspiring Makers to Experiment Create and Learn

Python in easy steps

Python in easy steps
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • In Easy Steps

Design for 3D Printing: Scanning, Creating, Editing, Remixing, and Making in Three Dimensions

Design for 3D Printing: Scanning, Creating, Editing, Remixing, and Making in Three Dimensions
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • Maker Media Inc

Coding for Beginners in easy steps: Basic Programming for All Ages

Coding for Beginners in easy steps: Basic Programming for All Ages
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020
  • In Easy Steps

Help Your Kids with Computer Coding: A Unique Step-by-Step Visual Guide, from Binary Code to Building Games

Help Your Kids with Computer Coding: A Unique Step-by-Step Visual Guide, from Binary Code to Building Games
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • DK Publishing Dorling Kindersley

Getting Started with 3D Printing: A Hands-on Guide to the Hardware, Software, and Services Behind the New Manufacturing Revolution

Getting Started with 3D Printing: A Hands-on Guide to the Hardware, Software, and Services Behind the New Manufacturing Revolution
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

Doing Math with Python: Use Programming to Explore Algebra, Statistics, Calculus, and More!

Doing Math with Python: Use Programming to Explore Algebra, Statistics, Calculus, and More!
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020
  • No Starch Press

Be Prepared for the AP Computer Science Exam in Java

Be Prepared for the AP Computer Science Exam in Java
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020

Teach Your Kids to Code: A Parent-Friendly Guide to Python Programming

Teach Your Kids to Code: A Parent-Friendly Guide to Python Programming
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020
  • No Starch Press

Short Story Review: Computers Don't Argue by Gordon R. Dickson

A classic science fiction story from 1965 this is a very early story about computers and gives you an idea of the technology at that time along with an interesting story

One of the most frustrating things in the world is knowing that something is absolutely true and yet not being able to convince someone. This is not a belief or an opinion but the flat truth. With most people you can eventually explain well enough to them that they will at least sort of acknowledge that you have a point but far to often in the modern computerized world there is no person and this story points out something that we have come to largely accept at a point when they had not yet accepted that so fully.

The story begins with a man who has joined a book club. He has been sent a book that costs five dollars but only half of the book was there. Because of that he sends the book back and sends off for a replacement. They instead send him the wrong book, he also sends this one back but they do not recognize that he has sent this back and begin to send him bills. At first this is a minor annoyance but it is all computerized and sending letters to explain it does not do anything because you can't argue with a computer.

As you might expect the story slowly escalates in absurdity. The bill is eventually sent to a collection agent and from there he is called into court. In court it is sent to the wrong courtroom where instead of small claims court he is tried for the kidnapping of Robert Lewis Stevenson, the author of the book that he didn't pay for.

The problem is that Robert Lewis Stevenson is already dead and so the judge could only assume that he was killed in the commission of the crime. So the man is sent to jail and from there it gets even worse.

This feels in some ways like a Mark Twain style farce with the absurd look at computers that is funny but also has some very good points as well.

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