13 Best Strength Training Dip Stands

List Updated July 2020

Bestselling Strength Training Dip Stands in 2020


Goplus Heavy Duty Dip Station Dip Bar Fitness Strength Power Training Stand W/Slings Loops

Goplus Heavy Duty Dip Station Dip Bar Fitness Strength Power Training Stand W/Slings Loops
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

Body Champ VKR1010 Fitness Multi function Power Tower/Multi station for Home Office Gym Dip Stands Pull Up Push up VKR

Body Champ VKR1010 Fitness Multi function Power Tower/Multi station for Home Office Gym Dip Stands Pull Up Push up VKR
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • Vertical knee raise station for leg and knee raises
  • Lat/pull-up bar builds powerful shoulders, arms, and back
  • Push-up bars to help you build strong chest muscles and tone your arms
  • Dip station develops your triceps as you increase upper body strength
  • D-Frame base for enhanced stability; measures 58.5 by 46.5 by 83 inches (L x W x H)

REEHUT Gymnastic Rings W/Adjustable Straps, Metal Buckles & Manual - Home Gym (Set of 2) - Non-Slip - Great for Workout, Strength Training, Fitness, Pull Ups and Dips, Ebook Included

REEHUT Gymnastic Rings W/Adjustable Straps, Metal Buckles & Manual - Home Gym (Set of 2) - Non-Slip - Great for Workout, Strength Training, Fitness, Pull Ups and Dips, Ebook Included
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • Package Included: 2 gymnastic rings with straps (1" wide and 15ft long) and adjusting buckles, 16 Pages Ebook included.
  • The stability straps are made out of strong polycarbonate nylon, won't buckle or bend, easily adjustable to suit your needs.
  • ABS plastic rings reduce slippage associated with sweaty hands. 300 lbs rated heavy duty.
  • Engage your muscles and core with exercises such as pull ups, push ups, dips, rows, muscle ups, chest flies and so on for a functional and varied free range of movement. Treat pains in the cervical vertebra and hunch back.
  • Easy to set up, use and adjust, providing your with a great home gym substitute.

Clout Fitness PRO Premiere Quick Release Pair of Locking 2" Olympic Size Barbell Clamp Collar Great for Pro Training (Pink)

Clout Fitness PRO Premiere Quick Release Pair of Locking 2
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • NEW DESIGN - PRO Premiere Barbell Collar with Steel Rods and Locking Latch
  • STRONGER - than classic version with thicker frame and steel rods
  • Perfect for workouts, Olympic lifts, overhead press, deadlifts, bench press, or any other workout using 2 inches Olympic Barbell
  • Works for all 2" / 50mm Olympic bars and all lifts. Color Pink
  • Package Includes: 2 Barbell Clips

Ainfox Power Tower, Capacity 550 Lbs Pull Up Bar Tower Dip Stands Fitness Gym Office

Ainfox Power Tower, Capacity 550 Lbs Pull Up Bar Tower Dip Stands Fitness Gym Office
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • Handles have grips for non-slip workouts;Weight capacity: 550LB
  • Made of oblate reinforced steel frame,Sturdy construction & step-up design
  • Back cushion size:10.2"x 17.9"x 2.0",Arm cushion size:11.8"x 4.7"x 2.0"
  • Dimension: 30.7"(L)x 42.5"(W)x 84.7"(H), Height can be adjusted from 64.6" to 84.6"
  • Easy assembly;Training abdominal muscles,arm, back ,chest, shoulders and leg muscles

Fashine Adjustable Power Tower Station, Multi-Function Chin Up, Pull Up, Push-Up, Dip Stands Workout Station Strength Training Fitness Equipment for Home Gym Office (US STOCK)

Fashine Adjustable Power Tower Station, Multi-Function Chin Up, Pull Up, Push-Up, Dip Stands Workout Station Strength Training Fitness Equipment for Home Gym Office (US STOCK)
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • Multi-station workout tower with 350 pounds weight capacity for working upper and lower body
  • Marbling steel with anti-rust paint; Designed for training abdominal muscles, arm, back, chest, shoulders and leg muscles
  • 4 level height adjustable: highest height: 230cm/89.7 inch; total height: 180cm/70.2 inch. Anti-skid comfort handle
  • Chin-up and pull-up station with multiple grip positions; Slip-resistant foot grips double as push-up bars; Dip station for triceps exercise; leg raise station for quads and lower abs exercise
  • Easy to assemble and all tool kit included. Buy this item with confidence, we are ready to answer any questions you have about this item

Draper's Strength Heavy Duty Pull Up Assist and Powerlifting Stretch Bands (Single Band or Set) 41-inch 6 Band Set (2-150 lbs)

Draper's Strength Heavy Duty Pull Up Assist and Powerlifting Stretch Bands (Single Band or Set) 41-inch 6 Band Set (2-150 lbs)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • From light to heavy resistance (2-200 lbs) - To choose the best bands for your needs, check out the band tension chart in the images to the left.
  • A variety of exercises can be performed - for physical therapy, rehabilitation, pull-ups, stretching, strength training, powerlifting and etc.
  • Bands are 41" inches long and are made of high-quality latex material built to last for years.
  • These high-quality bands are very durable so you can use them for years to come.
  • 90-DAY NO QUESTIONS ASKED MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE, FREE LIFETIME WARRANTY and FREE WORKOUT e-GUIDE with every band purchase

Weider Power Tower

Weider Power Tower
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020
  • Please Note: Weider is the only manufacturer and Amazon is the only authorized seller for this product on this marketplace. We do not guarantee quality, authenticity, or size if purchased from other sellers

POWER GUIDANCE Pull Up Bands Assisted Pull-up Resistance Exercise - for Body Stretching, Powerlifting, Resistance Training - RED

POWER GUIDANCE Pull Up Bands Assisted Pull-up Resistance Exercise - for Body Stretching, Powerlifting, Resistance Training - RED
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020

Lucky Tree Adjustable Dip Station Strength Training Exercise Power Rack Dipping Stand Parallel Bar for Home Gym

Lucky Tree Adjustable Dip Station Strength Training Exercise Power Rack Dipping Stand Parallel Bar for Home Gym
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

Ollieroo Heavy Duty Dip Stand Freestanding Dip Station Parallel Bar Bicep Triceps Home Gym Dipping Station Dip Bar-Black

Ollieroo Heavy Duty Dip Stand Freestanding Dip Station Parallel Bar Bicep Triceps Home Gym Dipping Station Dip Bar-Black
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020
  • Brand: Ollieroo.
  • Rugged steel frame, Maximum load: 425 lbs.
  • Freestanding dip station for working out chest, shoulders, delts, and triceps,Strong and healthy body, to show the charm of men.
  • Non-slip and abrasion-resistant rubber feet firmly position the barbell rack and to prevent damage to the floor injured joints.
  • Ergonomic angle of fitness equipment, knurled handle bar design reduces slipping, family friendly indoor fitness---Tips: Assembly process is very simple, the installation process, please see the product manual, I hope your understanding.

TOMSHOO Fitness Power Tower with Dip Station Pull Up Bar Standing Multi Push Up Knee Raise Stand Rack for Home Gym Workout

TOMSHOO Fitness Power Tower with Dip Station Pull Up Bar Standing Multi Push Up Knee Raise Stand Rack for Home Gym Workout
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020
  • Pull-up bar builds powerful shoulders, arms and back, push-up bars develop stronger chest muscles and tone your arms
  • Dip station for triceps, knee raise station for leg and knee raises
  • Thick cushioned arm rests and back rest for added comfort
  • Heavy duty steel construction with d-frame base for enhanced stability and durability and holds weight capacity up to 285 pounds

Yaheetech Heavy Duty Dip Stand Parallel Bar Bicep Triceps Home Gym Dipping Station Dip Bar Power Tower Capacity: 500 Lb

Yaheetech Heavy Duty Dip Stand Parallel Bar Bicep Triceps Home Gym Dipping Station Dip Bar Power Tower Capacity: 500 Lb
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020
  • Made of High Quality Iron Material & Weight Capacity: 500 lb.
  • Specially angled design for all users Professional grade | Freestanding dip station for working out chest, shoulders, delts, and triceps
  • Will Accommodate Tall & Heavy Person | Knurled to reduce slipping | Rubber feet firmly position the barbell rack and to avoid damage to your floor
  • 1 1/2" Diameter grip;15.7" Long hand grips;39.4 x 25.5 x 53.1 (L x W x H);Body made from 2" x 2" steel bars;G.W.:40 lb
  • Stable: parallel bars with long stand foot for good balance;Space Saving: compact in size and easy to move, will not occupy too much space

Taming the Meeting Monster

Are you putting in 5060or more hours per week just trying to keep up with work? Meetings may be the reason! A simple exercise could reveal the awful truth.

Meetings should be held where brainstorming, team establishment, consensus or decision-making must occur. If none of these things are occurring, a meeting may not be the right medium. Simple information sharing can be easily accomplished by a quick phone call or an email…or maybe a simple hallway conversation. Make sure allocating the time to coordinate, prepare and conduct a meeting is warranted by the desired outcome. In a world where we are increasingly asked to do more with less…including time…time is the one thing we cannot afford to waste.


Step 1 Are You Swimming or Drowning?

Let's find out where you are in the rising water of meetings…let's talk about how much time you currently devote to them. For the purposes of this exercise, we will only look at actual time spent inside meetings. Keep in mind that meetings, as a rule, don't just happen. Someone has to take the time to plan it…send out notices, prepare materials, arrange locations, arrange phone lines and reserve and set up equipment. Participants should be taking time to prepare for the meeting, as should the meeting facilitator or monitor. Then there is the time it takes to get to the meeting. Unless it is a conference call you are taking at your desk, you must allow for travel time. These are all additional investments of time (money) beyond the actual time spent in the meeting.

How much time do you spend in any given week attending meetings? Be honest with yourself! Look back through your calendar. Which of these categories do you fall into?

01 - 02 Hours Guru - you walk on the rising water of meetings give this information to someone else.
02 - 05 Hours Manager - you are managing meetings, stay alert
05 - 08 Hours Sitting Duck - meetings a creeping up on you
08 - 12 Hours Overboard - meetings are beginning to interfere with your work
12 - 16 Hours Slave - meetings are running you
gt; 16 Hours Warrior - you are in combat mode, fighting to get to the next meeting

If you take a look at what 5-8 hours per week in meetings looks like in a typical workweek of 40 hours, you only have 4 days left out of 5 to get your work done. By the time you are committing 16 hours or more per week to meetings, you are effectively faced with cramming 5 days of work into less than 3 days-and that's only if you use no preparation or travel time.


Step 2 - Ask Questions

There are four questions you should ask to raise yourself out of the meeting flood.

1. Is this meeting really necessary?

Again, this may seem obvious, yet how many meetings have you attended where you walked away wondering, "what was that about?" or "what a waste of time."

2. Do I Need To Participate?

This might also seem obvious, yet I can't tell you how many meetings I have been asked to attend, simply because my name was on some list. Ensure there is a valid, value add reason for your attendance.

How many meetings have you sat through and wondered why you were there? If you cannot clearly identify why you are being asked to attend, contact the individual calling the meeting and ask them to define your participation. If they can't, see question 4 and envoke it.

3. Are There Alternatives To A Meeting?

Meetings are sometimes just an easy option instead of thinking through what is needed…planning. Determine if pre-work or interim work can be conducted outside of a group meeting, using email or smaller groups. Can the meeting wait until a significant amount of information and detail has been collected?

4. May I be excused?

Woo Ha! Did I say that? Yes! And so should you. If you were unable to determine your value add prior to the meeting and find yourself in a meeting where you are not adding value, speak up. Ask the facilitator or monitor to clarify your expected contribution and determine if that is taking place. If not…opt out. There are at least three other people in the room wanting to ask to be excused, yet too afraid to break the unwritten meeting rule of "my name was on the list, so I must attend."


Step 3 - Plan The Rescue

Meetings that work have:

· a defined purpose,
· structure and
· roles and responsibilities.

The larger the group of individuals involved in a meeting the more critical the details of these components become. A meeting that fails to embrace these things can become an exercise in "herding cats"…fruitless, frustrating and "fuzzy".

Purpose

Why are we here? The purpose of a meeting should be defined as the outcome. "When we leave this meeting we will have…" Fill in the blank. Here are some examples.

…a decision on how we go forward with the project.
…a set of terms to use for the XYZ program.
…an agreement on the parameters of the project.
…a plan for the evaluation process.

If the sole outcome of the meeting is to have another meeting…"May I be excused?"

Structure

The best way to define meeting structure for everyone is by way of an agenda. The agenda should be distributed in advance of the meeting, not five minutes before or at the beginning of the meeting. By giving attendees time to think about the objective or outcome, they will be better prepared to participate. Not everyone can "think on his or her feet." If you don't want to have to do all the talking, look at blank stares or suffer through long moments of silence, get that agenda out there and working for you.

The larger the group, again, the more detail. When creating an agenda include:

· Date and Time
· Location
· Conference Call or Bridge line Numbers
· Name of Meeting Coordinator
· RSVP
· Objective/Outcome
· Topics and Time Allocations
· Names of Attendees
· Expected Contributions or Areas of Expertise of Attendees
· Resource or Reference Material

In addition to a written agenda, the meeting should have a set of standards or norms for how it will be conducted, a dos and don'ts list. Depending on the size of the group and the relationship of the individuals, this may be as simple as we will let each other talk and not interrupt or as complex as a written working agreement. A working agreement is a statement of how individuals will conduct themselves in a specific working situation. It should be prepared and agreed to by all individuals involved…not by the management and handed down as a mandate. It is called an agreement because it is critical that the group agree to the code of conduct. If there is no agreement, there can be no enforcement.

Roles and Responsibilities

By assigning roles for meetings, individuals are better prepared to assume responsibilities within the meetings, the meetings are more effective and the comfort level of the group increases. We will talk about five roles within a meeting and their relative responsibilities. You may find other books or articles on meetings that define more or fewer roles. That is the wonderful thing about ideas, we can each have our own. These are the roles that I have found most effective and most accepted:

· Facilitator
· Timekeeper
· Gatekeeper (future)
· Recorder (present)
· Participant

Not every meeting requires all of these roles. However, facilitator and timekeeper are critical even for short meetings. Also, keep in mind that sometimes a single individual may take on more than one role. The facilitator and timekeeper may be the same person. The overall point is that these roles add structure to the meeting and help ensure productive outcomes.

Facilitator

The facilitator is the first line of defense against ineffective and out of control meetings. As the leader of the group, the facilitator should be the prime example of appropriate behaviors). They:

· create the meeting framework,
· create and distribute the agenda,
· identify appropriate participants,
· review previous meeting records,
· encourage and ensure individual participation, manage over/under participation
· manage the meeting flow to the agenda and
· act as "Sergeant at Arms."

Timekeeper

The timekeeper is the group's clock-watcher. How many times has your meeting run over or failed to cover all agenda items? With a timekeeper you are more likely to end on time and get through the agenda. They assist the facilitator in managing meeting flow to agenda by providing time warnings ("two more minutes for the topic," "meeting ends in 15 minutes") and they recap meeting results and to dos.

Gatekeeper

The gatekeeper keeps track of items that come up during the meeting that do not fit on the current agenda, yet should be discussed at another meeting or passed along to another department or individual. The gatekeeper:

· identifies and records issues/suggestions outside of agenda or scope of meeting
· summarizes items on the gatekeeper list at the end of the meeting
· forwards recorded issues/suggestions to facilitator for action
· assists facilitator in managing meeting flow to agenda by suggesting items be recorded for future discussion or handoff to others ("we may want to turn that issue over to the accounting team," "we may be getting off target for this meeting")

Recorder

The recorder is the gatekeeper of the present. They identify and record important points, decisions and actions from the meeting and forward recorded important points, decisions and actions or assignments to the facilitator

Participant

The participant is sometimes the most under used role within a meeting. Many participants are not prepared to participate in meetings, sometimes because they had no idea why they were asked to attend, sometimes because they didn't have time to prepare and many times because they did not understand the importance of their role. The participant:

· ensures participation in meeting is appropriate
· prepares
· participates
· shares ideas
· asks questions
· encourages others to participate
· assists facilitator, timekeeper, gatekeeper and recorder in managing flow to agenda, staying on time, identifying out of scope items and action items


Step 4 - Shark Repellent

There are sharks in them thar' waters! Once you know where they hide, you'll know when to bring out the "shark repellent." Below are some common meeting pitfalls and some strategies on how to avoid them.

Getting off subject/lack of control · Have an agenda with time allocations· Assign roles· Establish working agreement, goal/objective

No agenda/too much on agenda · Have an agenda with time allocations· Have a specific goal/objective· Stay on time by assigning timekeeper· Split agenda into must dos and like to dos

Starting late/running over · Say on time (assign facilitator and timekeeper)· Have an agenda with time allocations· Assign roles· Send out agenda and handouts two days in advance· Do your homework, come prepared· Remember common courtesy (see A Word About Time…)· Manage your time· Establish working agreement and goal/objective· Don't back track, recap or hold up meeting for late attendees

Wrong individuals/no one can make the decision · Have a specific goal/objective· Invite individuals who can both contribute and resolve· Assume responsibility for determining your need to attend

No preparation/no time to prepare · Do your homework, come prepared· Allow sufficient time for offsite participants to receive material· Send out agenda and any pertinent handouts two days in advance· Take into consideration review and response times· Take responsibility for the role you play in every meeting· Establish a working agreement and goal/objective· Require RSVP

Individuals who dominate/don't participate · Assign roles· Do homework, come prepared· Establish working agreement and goal/objective· Take responsibility for the role you play· Listen more than you speak in every meeting

Nothing gets accomplished · Have an agenda with time allocations· Assign roles· Send out agenda and pertinent handouts two days in advance· Do your homework, come prepared· Establish working agreement and goal/objective· Make sure a meeting is the right medium to accomplish the goal

You may have noticed that the strategies to avoid the pitfalls or "sharks" are very similar and relatively simple. So why aren't meetings being conducted effectively today? Because old habits die hard and most of us just "go with the flow." Change is a process that takes time, energy and effort. Not everyone is ready to come out of that comfortable little rut. Besides..."we've always done it this way..."


A Word About Time…

…it is finite! Until time travel becomes reality, we must deal with the realities of 60 minutes in an hour, 24 hours in a day and 7 days in a week. It is humanly impossible (cloning aside) to be in two places at once. If a meeting ends at 10:00 and the next one starts at 10:00, unless they are taking place in the same place, travel time will be required. Here are some novel ideas:

· stop scheduling meetings on the hour and use the quarter hour
· schedule meeting in 50 minute increments instead of hours (9:00 to (9:50)
· schedule meeting for 30 minutes instead of an hour by paring down the agenda and assigning prework
· think twice about two hour meetings…our brains can't focus on one issue, in one context for two hours…reality is that our attention span as adults will max out at about 20 minutes.

As individuals we each have our daily allocation of time. Respecting our own time and time of others can help in meeting management.

Being late:

· Interrupts
· Affects others
· Damages relationships and credibility
· Implies you don't care
· Shows disrespect for others

Running over:

· Effects subsequent activities
· Shows disrespect for others
· Creates frustration
· Increases stress


Other Realities

We are physical beings, not machines. We may need a drink of water or a trip to the bathroom. Did you know that prolonged sitting can cause poor circulation and blood pooling! If the blood isn't getting to the brain…it isn't going to be working at optimum.

Most human bite cases are reported at hospitals in the late afternoon…between 4:00 and 5:00. If the workday began at 8:00 or 9:00, think twice about that 4:00 meeting. This can be one of the least productive times of the day. It is time to slow down and get ready to transition to life…and the commute home. People tend to be less creative, less motivated and…based on the hospital reports…most irritable in the late afternoon.


Step 5 - Executing The Rescue

As individuals we each have a sphere of influence where we can attempt to enlighten others and initiate change. Even if the only individual in your sphere of influence is you, you can make some changes in the way you approach meetings. Here are some things to do.

If you haven't yet completed Step 1 do it for yourself. If you are a manager or have a group you regularly work with, do an information survey of the group. Find out how much time they spend in meetings as individuals, roll that up to a total for the group, then apply an average salary to the total time. How much is it costing to have that many meetings? Share the results with the group and ask for suggestions and recommendations. Once individuals see the numbers and mentally connect with how this affects them and their time, they are usually primed to at least attempt some changes.

Survey Result Sample

· 30% of week in meetings per individual or (1.5 days)

· Average salary of $35,000

· $216 per individual per week (just for the meeting time, no prep or travel time included)

· 50 people x $216 = $10,800 per week x 48 weeks = $518,400 per year

· Cutting existing meeting time by 1/3 for this group would save approximately $155,520 in time dollars per year (that could be allocated to actual work) and give each individual back ½ day

Move to step 2, start asking questions of yourself and others. Have them ask the same questions.
Ask for or prepare agendas, including time allocations and objectives/goals. Begin to introduce the information and the roles in Step 3, even if you simply take on a role yourself, informally.

Know the pitfalls in Step 4 and attempt to modify behaviors through gentle persuasion. "Do you think that might be something to talk about at the next meeting?" "I notice we only have 10 minutes left for this meeting. Do we need to make a decision on the XYZ and carry the RST over to the next meeting?" "I have to excuse myself, I have another meeting."

Putting your perspective in the form of a question makes it more palatable to others
…asking rather than telling!

The first inducement for individuals to use effective meeting management strategies is that it becomes the accepted way of doing business, leading by example. The following are some specific inherent inducements for effective meeting management:

Start on time

· Table meetings, if the originator doesn't show up (and no other facilitator has been designated).
· Do not recap, stop for, or acknowledge late arrivals.
· Start at the designated start time, even if all participants are not there.

End on time

· Interrupt meetings that have gone over (if they are using your meeting room).
· Excuse yourself at the designated end time.

Be prepared

· Decline to attend meetings for which:
- you do not have time to prepare.
- no one can define your role.
· Cancel meeting when attendees are not prepared.

Monitor Behavior/Participation

· Provide feedback to attendees.
· Managers must coach their people.
· Recognize appropriate behaviors/examples.
· Override inappropriate behaviors/examples.

Celebrate

· Set goals and celebrate reaching them.
· Reward individuals championing the change.
· Give 30 minutes of the hours saved to each individual participating as extra lunch, come in late or leave early time. You'll be gaining more than you give.

In some companies, this may seem like radical thinking, but only because large organizations tend to hold fast to their "artifacts of the past." Change for most people is at the least a challenge and often very uncomfortable. Yet, the statistics are valid. Salaries (hours) are one of the heaviest costs of an organization. Getting the most out of that investment is only good business.

Related Bestselling Lists That You Might Like