13 Best Romance Fiction Writing Reference

List Updated July 2020

Bestselling Romance Fiction Writing Reference in 2020


Writing Romances: A Handbook by the Romance Writers of America

Writing Romances: A Handbook by the Romance Writers of America
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

Writing a Romance Novel For Dummies

Writing a Romance Novel For Dummies
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020

Romance: Build A Plot Workbook (Story Building Blocks 15)

Romance: Build A Plot Workbook (Story Building Blocks 15)
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020

The Outlandish Companion (Revised and Updated): Companion to Outlander, Dragonfly in Amber, Voyager, and Drums of Autumn

The Outlandish Companion (Revised and Updated): Companion to Outlander, Dragonfly in Amber, Voyager, and Drums of Autumn
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • Delacorte Press

Write Naked: A Bestseller's Secrets to Writing Romance & Navigating the Path to Success

Write Naked: A Bestseller's Secrets to Writing Romance & Navigating the Path to Success
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life

Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • Anchor Books

Romance, Emotion, and Erotica Writers' Phrase Book: Essential Reference and Thesaurus for Authors of All Romantic Fiction, including Contemporary, Historical, ... and Suspense (Writers' Phrase Books Book 7)

Romance, Emotion, and Erotica Writers' Phrase Book: Essential Reference and Thesaurus for Authors of All Romantic Fiction, including Contemporary, Historical, ... and Suspense (Writers' Phrase Books Book 7)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

Writing Fiction For Dummies

Writing Fiction For Dummies
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

100 Romance Writing Prompts (Fiction Ideas Vol. 2)

100 Romance Writing Prompts (Fiction Ideas Vol. 2)
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020

The Book of Us: The Journal of Your Love Story in 150 Questions

The Book of Us: The Journal of Your Love Story in 150 Questions
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

Writing The Bestseller: Romantic And Commercial Fiction (Romance Writing Masterclass Book 1)

Writing The Bestseller: Romantic And Commercial Fiction (Romance Writing Masterclass Book 1)
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020

Writing the Bestseller II: Romantic and Commercial Fiction (Romance Writing Masterclass Book 2)

Writing the Bestseller II: Romantic and Commercial Fiction (Romance Writing Masterclass Book 2)
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020

Mac and Cheese (I Can Read Level 1)

Mac and Cheese (I Can Read Level 1)
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020
  • HarperCollins

Get Creative: Defeating NaNoWriMo

A guide to help you complete National Novel Writing Month without cheating, and also a few things that will help you start that novel you've been thinking about writing.

Ah, National Novel Writing Month or as I like to call it: Pull Your Hair Out Month. Yeah, it may be true that some people can muster 50,000 words that month, but it usually comes out smelling and looking a lot like a turn made of word vomit. This isn't a bad thing, but when they finally go over it at the end they don't want to touch it because it's too gross. What they've done is wasted an entire month writing a book they don't like and refuse to rewrite. Well, I say to hell with that! For us OCD writers that need to have a well-manicured manuscript by the time we reach the end, here is you guide to 50,000 or more words and one sexy novel.

The first thing you should do-and the official website mentions this-is work on an outline. You'll want to give yourself plenty of time to brainstorm and have a working outline to apply to your novel when the time comes.

Next, you'll need to take a moment, kick your feet up outside, let the cool breeze tickle your face, and imagine your movie as though it were on the silver screen. I know, I know… some people might be frowning upon that advice as I type it. In fact, even before this article is released I can feel millions of laser targets pointing between my eyes. Just… hear me out.

The reason I say think about it in movie format is because you are working against a clock in November. You have the whole month, sure, but I'd wager that most of you don't have the time to waste writing 1,600 words a day much less turn it into a sweet, polished novel by the end of the month. This is where the movie thing comes in, because when you day dream about turning the book into a movie, you are essentially getting the visual things out of the way so that you don't have to think of it on the fly during the month. Surely you'll still be thinking about some of the visuals when you get there, but you'll have at least rid yourself of most of the thinking. The other reason for this is that most people tend to remember movies, and that means if you have a fantasy novel with all kinds of pretty visuals and scenes, you'll likely remember all of that when it comes time to go through your outline and start writing.

Now that you have that out of the way, you can focus more on descriptions and building characters. You may tell me that you don't have time to write and build characters and their backgrounds during November. You'd be right, and that's something you need to start ahead of time, too. I don't know about the rest of you, but when I work on a novel I have an outline for the novel itself but also for each and every character that needs a background. There is nothing against writing these outlines, and when you are done with these outlines, guess what? You now know your characters intimately. Like you know your friends choices before they make them, you will know what your character will do when faced with a difficult choice. Even if it isn't a difficult choice, you will naturally write them doing exactly what they would do as if they were their own person. Does Amber open the bedroom door or does she climb out the window to take an alternate route? Is she quick witted? Does she dress a certain way? Does she like her men (or women) to have a certain personality? All of these questions can be answered, and in addition to that, all of her dialog will reflect what you know of her.

Finally, you want to practice editing as you go. This is something I really needed to learn to do because I don't like reading through my book 100 times before I send it to the editor's chopping block. I want to only have to go through it one or two times, and then be rid of it for a couple weeks. That's where editing on the fly comes in.

When you edit as you go, you have a more polished novel when you finish. The problem is that editing as you go can take a lot of work. I mean a lot. So you have to practice and get used to it. Take a few months and train yourself to rock at editing while you work (sort of like whistling, but with more blood, sweat, and vodka).

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