13 Best Power Milling Machine Replacement Parts

List Updated March 2020

Bestselling Power Milling Machine Replacement Parts in 2020


Bridgeport BP 12193519 Handwheel Assembly

Bridgeport BP 12193519 Handwheel Assembly
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020
  • Genuine Bridgeport Knee Mill replacement part
  • Manufactured to OEM specifications
  • Sourced directly from Hardinge- the only authorized provider of Bridgeport knee mills, parts and service

RAM-PRO 7-Pc Countersink Drill Bit Set with Stop Collars & Wrench, Perfect for Wood | Quick Change Pre-Drill Counterbore Drill Bits Made for Screw Sizes: # 5,6,7,8,9,10,12.

RAM-PRO 7-Pc Countersink Drill Bit Set with Stop Collars & Wrench, Perfect for Wood | Quick Change Pre-Drill Counterbore Drill Bits Made for Screw Sizes: # 5,6,7,8,9,10,12.
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020

Bridgeport BP 11630134 Power Feed Front Cover Gasket

Bridgeport BP 11630134 Power Feed Front Cover Gasket
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • Genuine Bridgeport Knee Mill replacement part
  • Manufactured to OEM specifications
  • Sourced directly from Hardinge- the only authorized provider of Bridgeport knee mills, parts and service

Bidirection Mist Coolant Lubrication Spray System For 8mm Air Pipe CNC Lathe Mill Drill Carving Machine

Bidirection Mist Coolant Lubrication Spray System For 8mm Air Pipe CNC Lathe Mill Drill Carving Machine
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • Water problem solving tools, easier to clean up.
  • Processing the coolant can save more than 80%, the cooling effect is no less than the conventional
  • Gas processing chips are blown away, working safer, the nebulizer gas and coolant is adjustable, easy to use on different processing conditions
  • Even the super-hard alloy precision machining the workpiece can achieve a smooth surface, increases the machine cutting speed, save time and reduce processing costs and tool wear
  • Fit for 8mm air pipe; Cooling stone/metal/ceramic tile engraving machine; For CNC Lathe Milling Drill machine

Bridgeport BP 11570996 Standard Power Drawbar

Bridgeport BP 11570996 Standard Power Drawbar
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • Genuine Bridgeport Knee Mill replacement part
  • Manufactured to OEM specifications
  • Sourced directly from Hardinge- the only authorized provider of Bridgeport knee mills, parts and service

uxcell Milling Machine M10x15mm Male Thread Plastic Handle Revolving Hand Grip Black

uxcell Milling Machine M10x15mm Male Thread Plastic Handle Revolving Hand Grip Black
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • Main Material: Metal, Plastic; Package Content: 1 x Revolving Handle
  • Product Name: Revolving Handle; Weight: 75g
  • Main Color: Silver Tone,Black
  • Overall Size: 100 x 23mm/4" x 0.9"(L*Max.D)
  • Thread Size(Approx): M10 x 15mm/0.4" x 0.6"(D*L)

Jian Ya Na 80mm Double Door Engraving Machine Dust Cover Woodworking Spindle Cover for CNC Router Engraving Milling Machine

Jian Ya Na 80mm Double Door Engraving Machine Dust Cover Woodworking Spindle Cover for CNC Router Engraving Milling Machine
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • Double door, suitable for a variety of models spindle motor
  • Seamless process
  • thickening nylon brush, vacuum capacity
  • Thickened metal, solid deformation
  • Comapct design with beautiful metal paint

Nizzco 0.3-6.5mm Keyless Drill Chuck Conversion Tool?Keyless Conversion Chuck Adapter,1/4-Inch Hex Shank Drill

Nizzco 0.3-6.5mm Keyless Drill Chuck Conversion Tool?Keyless Conversion Chuck Adapter,1/4-Inch Hex Shank Drill
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

Nizzco 2PCS 0.3-6.5mm Keyless Drill Chuck Conversion Tool,Keyless Conversion Chuck Adapter,1/4-Inch Hex Shank Drill

Nizzco 2PCS 0.3-6.5mm Keyless Drill Chuck Conversion Tool,Keyless Conversion Chuck Adapter,1/4-Inch Hex Shank Drill
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020

CSLU Lathes MT2# 60 Degree Point Morse Taper Lathes Dead Center,Hard Alloy

CSLU Lathes MT2# 60 Degree Point Morse Taper Lathes Dead Center,Hard Alloy
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • The point mosaics tungsten carbide, the surface hardness is above HRC85 degree, resistant to wear and tear, the accuracy is reliable(less than 0.01).
  • The taper shank is made from high quality steel, the quenching hardness is between HRC40 and HRC45, it will be durable and wear-resisting after quenching.
  • Mainly suitable for grinding machine, milling machine, lathe, drilling machine, etc.
  • The top fixed alloy is mainly used for machining shaft, sets of parts.
  • The center hole positioning makes the precision of parts higher.

Billet Aluminum CAT 40 Tool Holder Fixture for Tightening, Vise, and Mounting

Billet Aluminum CAT 40 Tool Holder Fixture for Tightening, Vise, and Mounting
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020
  • Billet Aluminum CAT 40 Tool Holder

Bridgeport BP 12061249 Knee Crank Assembly, Series I Machines

Bridgeport BP 12061249 Knee Crank Assembly, Series I Machines
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020
  • Genuine Bridgeport Knee Mill replacement part
  • Manufactured to OEM specifications
  • Sourced directly from Hardinge- the only authorized provider of Bridgeport knee mills, parts and service

Billet Aluminum CAT 40 Tool Holder Fixture for Tightening

Billet Aluminum CAT 40 Tool Holder Fixture for Tightening
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020
  • Billet Aluminum CAT 40 Tool Holder Fixture

Radio Astronomy: Constructing a Corrugated Feedhorn

How a corrugated feedhorn is built in the machine shop and chemistry laboratory.

When you look up into the night sky, you see the moon and stars. But there's much more there! There are pulsars and quasars, asteroids and planets, comets and binaries, gas clouds and galaxies. Whether you use an optical telescope, a pair of binoculars, or nothing at all, you see what you see because light enters the pupils of your eyes and the resultant electrical impulses travel along your optic nerve to your brain where they are interpreted as an image.

What are radio waves, and how do we see them?

Light is a form of electromagnetic energy given off by by many objects in space. Besides this, there are additional kinds of energy given off by some of the heavenly bodies. Radio frequency energy may be among them, and the sources from which radio waves emanate are called "radio sources." One picks up the waves from these sources using "radio telescopes." The study of outer space using radio telescopes is what we call "radio astronomy." Instead of the pupils or openings of human eyes, these energy packets are received through a device called a "feedhorn." A feedhorn might remind you of the instrument deaf people used back in the early part of the 20th century, when they would hold a hollow, conical horn up to their ear to gather and amplify the sounds around them. By doing this, they could sometimes hear what they otherwise would not have. In the case of feedhorns used in radio astronomy, the extremely weak radio-wave signals are received and channeled by the feedhorn to sensitive, often supercooled electronic circuits, not unlike hearing aid circuitry, only vastly more sophisticated, and these amplified signals are interpreted by complex high-frequency electronics, with the assistance of computers. Thus we are able to "see" a radio-image of a heavenly body, even as we can see its photographic image.

What is a feedhorn, and how does it work?

But what exactly is a corrugated feedhorn, and what does it mean to electroform them? Then, knowing that, how does one electroform them?

A feedhorn, for our purposes, is a hollow, cone-shaped piece of metal with a likewise hollow "nipple" at the apex of the cone. It is corrugated in that it has fins on the inside. The feed horn receives the signal at the wide, often circular end. It travels along the inside across the fins, and into the narrow, circular cross-sectioned neck, which over a short travel-distance transforms to a rectangular cross-section before the signal enters an attached rectangular "waveguide" via an adapter. The wave guide is usually part of either a pre-amplifier or an amplifier which is needed to strengthen the incoming signal. The corrugations help insure the signal will remain pure.

What is electroforming, and how does one electroform a feedhorn?

Electroforming is the process of electroplating, not a few microinches or even hundreds of microinches, but thousands of microinches and more, even up to inches of thickness, thus "forming" an object. Electroforming encompasses quite a number of techniques that may be used to construct a wide variety of objects. I will discuss the methods I most frequently used to manufacture feedhorns and other microwave electronic devices.

I worked for 23 years for a famous radio astronomy organization, serving as technical specialist. The feedhorns I manufactured pick up weak signals from radio objects in deep space. Such devices possess geometries difficult to electroform, including grooves that are very deep, compared to their width. In addition, many of the feedhorns had a proportionately large overall size with a long but very thin protrusion. This protrusion introduces greater difficulty because, like a lightning rod, it tends to draw more than its share of the electric current devoted to plating the entire piece. This difficulty can be partly overcome during the electroforming process, and will be discussed again later. I include one rough drawing to give an idea of what the mandrels used to electroform a feedhorn look like.

But how does one copper-electroform a feedhorn? Imagine a photographic negative. From this negative, a positive print is created, then the negative can be stored, or even destroyed. Electroform mandrels are a bit like that. Some mandrels in some situations can be reused. But our mandrels, made of aluminum, were destroyed by dissolving them out with hydrochloric acid, or in some critical instances, with sodium hydroxide solution. Aluminum dissolves in either of those, leaving behind only the electroformed copper 'positive' or part.

Here then, is the method. A highly-skilled machinist, capable of machining complicated parts to at least a 0.0002" tolerance, takes a blank of aluminum, typically of 2024 alloy, and machines it to blueprint specifications. Following a deburring process to get rid of aluminum shavings and excessively sharp edges, they clean the machined mandrels as thoroughly as possible so the laboratory will only have to remove (carefully) the remaining traces of grits, oils, greases, oxides, and dirt.

The aluminum mandrel is then complete, and ready for processing, which makes it time to electroform. The mandrel is attached by a threaded end to a titanium rod with insulation, that will be electrically connected to a constant-current power source, eventually making the mandrel negative in charge in plating baths. Now copper does not adhere well to aluminum, no matter how clean the aluminum is. An intermediary layer must go on the aluminum that will enable it to receive copper. This layer, generally, is a zinc layer formed by immersion-coating in a sodium zincate solution. There are a variety of formulations for this immersion dip, but we used a standard solution employing sodium hydroxide and zinc oxide, along with a trace of iron from ferric chloride. Before dipping the mandrel in the zincate solution, it is necessary to immerse it in a 10% sodium hydroxide solution for a period of seconds, until bubbling is vigorous, and then a thorough rinse in tap water and distilled water follows. This removes the ever-present oxide layer. The part, still wet, is then immersed in the zincate solution. Now it can remain for a while in that solution. I like to immerse it for at least 30 seconds. Taking the mandrel out, I quickly rinse the excess zincate off, and immerse the mandrel in a fairly strong nitric acid solution, perhaps 50:50 concentrated nitric acid and water for five or so seconds. The zincate coat dissolves quickly but somehow modifies the surface of the mandrel. Then the water-rinse process is repeated, and while still wet, the mandrel is re-immersed in zincate solution. The whole procedure is referred to as "double-zincating."

A final and thorough rinse is made in distilled water, and the part, quickly, and while still wet, is electroplated in a copper-cyanide 'strike bath' or 'flash bath,' that employs Rochelle salts. It ought to be noted that the part is immersed electrically hot. To do this, I have a shorting switch on the power supply that is immediately switched off as the part is immersed. As mentioned earlier, many feedhorns have a long protrusion, which, if immersed first in the bath, will take quite a jolt of electricity, so I prefer to dip the feedhorn into the flash bath along its side, to avoid 'whiskering,' or dendritic copper growth on the corners of the end of the snout, due to excessive "electrical density." The plating time is perhaps 30 seconds.

With yet another thorough rinsing in water, this copper-flashed mandrel will then be plated for at least a minute in an acid-copper sulfate bath, to smooth the surface. This, too, is rinsed. Just a note on what we've done so far. We have made what now looks like a shiny copper version of the mandrel we started with, attached to a masked titanium rod. Believe it or not, all of what we have so far constructed we will eventually destroy! We will dissolve the aluminum, zinc, copper flash, and thin layer of acid copper and dispose of it! But not just yet. Next, we take this shiny mandrel and immerse it in a cyanide-gold flash bath, in which we will plate it for perhaps 30 seconds or so, to be followed by immersion into a cyanide gold bath for plating a good thick coating of gold, often more than 100 microinches thick to add durability to prevent corrosion and avoid electrical skin-depth problems.* After plating this layer on, another dip in the copper flash bath, and it is into the acid copper bath again, this time for days, possibly even weeks!

When the electroforming is completed, what's needed next to complete our feedhorn?

When it is done and we take it out of the bath, we wash it off, dry it, give it back to the machinists who machine the outside, then solder an adapter at the narrow end. We get it back, gold plate it on the outside, and then we destroy the insides of the part, dissolving the aluminum and zinc out with hydrochloric acid or sodium hydroxide as we mentioned above, then we dissolve, using dilute nitric acid, the copper flash out. This leaves the final product!

We have our feedhorn, nice, bright, gold, and ready to use. Time to give it to the electrical engineers! Using our feedhorn, they attach it to a waveguide that is part of a complex electrical arrangement that will be mounted on a radio telescope.

It is time to put it to use! Won't it be nice to see some grand images thanks, in part, to our corrugated feedhorn we made by electroforming, but Thanks more especially to the One who made all those grand things in the heavens that we seek to understand!

* Beyond the scope of this discussion.

Note: The first of the URLs I have included with this article shows a feedhorn I made, marked 43 GHz, VLBA, which stands for a frequency of operation of 43 gigahertz, and the fact that the "horn" (short for feedhorn) is used in the Very Large Baseline Array, which is a collection of telescopes made to create an even larger image of deep-space objects. The technique used to increase image size by means of an array of radio telescopes is beyond the scope of this article, but may be the subject of a followup discussion.

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