10 Best Mountaineering & Ice Climbing Equipment

List Updated May 2020

Bestselling Mountaineering & Ice Climbing Equipment in 2020


Jeebel Camp Outdoor Waterproof Dustproof Antiwater Snow Leg Gaiters Leg Boot Covers For Hiking Ski Climbing Hunting Walking Snowboard Snowshoeing Mountaineering Ice Equipment (Blue)

Jeebel Camp Outdoor Waterproof Dustproof Antiwater Snow Leg Gaiters Leg Boot Covers For Hiking Ski Climbing Hunting Walking Snowboard Snowshoeing Mountaineering Ice Equipment (Blue)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

Fusion Climb Strux Aluminum Rescue Side Swing Pulley Blue 34KN

Fusion Climb Strux Aluminum Rescue Side Swing Pulley Blue 34KN
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • Strux Side Swing Rescue Pulley
  • 2" aluminum, 0.64" through size, fixed aluminum side swing plates with smooth rounded edges, Large hole for multiple carabiner attachment
  • Strength: MBS: 34 KN
  • Rope size: < 14mm
  • Dimensions: 4.75" x 3.25" x 1.25"

Ravifun Ice Cleats, Snow Spikes Crampons Unisex Anti Slip Shoes Grippers with 18 Teeth Stainless Steel for Winter Walking Hiking Mountaineering, Size L

Ravifun Ice Cleats, Snow Spikes Crampons Unisex Anti Slip Shoes Grippers with 18 Teeth Stainless Steel for Winter Walking Hiking Mountaineering, Size L
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • The 18 teeth ice crampons are made of high quality stainless steel cleats, thicker and stronger to makes it never bend and safe for outdoor activity. Th spike-and-chain system which provides excellent traction on a variety of ice surfaces or other worst conditions.
  • Hard plastic tape into a super elastic rubber band ensures a tight hold on your shoe,keep you safe and injury-free. 12cm+12cm, flexible and extensible, suitable for all kinds of footwear, such as hiking shoes, and mountain boots, sports shoes, etc.
  • Very simple to use this ice cleats, buckle in the shoes, the front has a hook, the laces tied to the hook is very strong. Easy to adjust the degree of tightness, comfortable and stays in place. Two straps make sure the ice crampons more tighter and safer.
  • Suitable for outdoor four seasons essential. Reduce the risk of injury from slips and falls when walk on ice, snow, mud and wet grass or other poor conditions. Perfect for not only outdoor walking, climbing, hiking, ice fishing,etc., but also for the use of snow and ice in the city, especially for the elderly children snow slide out of season to use.
  • Small size, light weight, about 390g/pair. Come in a pouch for easy carry. Can be put it in a small storage bag and even pockets. The package includes 1 pair of Crampons, 1 pair of Velcro Straps and 1 piece of carry Bag.

Weanas 1 Pair Unisex Adult Child Extra Warm Outdoor Ice Snow Shoes Gaiters Cover Fleece Leg Warmer Liner Windproof Waterproof Hiking Skiing Climbing Hunting Jogging Mountaineering

Weanas 1 Pair Unisex Adult Child Extra Warm Outdoor Ice Snow Shoes Gaiters Cover Fleece Leg Warmer Liner Windproof Waterproof Hiking Skiing Climbing Hunting Jogging Mountaineering
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • Protect your boots and pants from water, snow, rain, mud and wind
  • Designed with adjustable elastic band for convenient and firm bundling
  • Velcro for easier putting on and taking off
  • Rust-proof shoelace hook and adjustable strap to firmly bundle your shoes
  • Great for skiing, hiking, fishing, hunting, and other outdoor activities

OuterStar Traction Cleats Ice Snow Grips Anti Slip Stainless Steel Spikes Crampons for Footwear M/L

OuterStar Traction Cleats Ice Snow Grips Anti Slip Stainless Steel Spikes Crampons for Footwear M/L
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • Stainless steel spikes can dig into varieties terrain,the steel chain can prevent move side-to-side, keep you safe and injury-free
  • Excellent toughness and strength,will not bend, fixed performance and climbing performance is excellent
  • Great for all kinds of sports shoes, hiking shoes, mountaineering boots,etc
  • Be used conveniently,light weight constructions and easy to carry
  • Material:rubber+steel chain+stainless steel claw

Omega Pacific Mountain Ice Axe, 65 cm, NiCroMo Head & Spike - 6061 Aircraft Alloy Aluminum Shaft

Omega Pacific Mountain Ice Axe, 65 cm, NiCroMo Head & Spike - 6061 Aircraft Alloy Aluminum Shaft
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • Solid, strong Mountain Axe
  • Laser-cut, steel head and spike
  • Aircraft-quality aluminum shaft

Camp Neve Ice Pick - 57cm

Camp Neve Ice Pick - 57cm
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • General Mountaineering
  • Carabiner holes at head and spike
  • Symmetric steel spike plunges smoothly
  • Equipped with sliding leash
  • Weight: 15 oz

Wildken Mountaineering Climbing Aluminum

Wildken Mountaineering Climbing Aluminum
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020
  • Wildken Mountaineering Climbing Aluminum

Kahtoola MICROspikes Footwear Traction - 2015/16

Kahtoola MICROspikes Footwear Traction - 2015/16
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • Award-winning traction digs in and grabs icy terrain
  • Great for winter trail running, hiking, and ice fishing
  • 12 Stainless Steel spikes (3/8 inch length) per foot on all sizes
  • Weight Per Pair: Small 11 oz., Medium 12 oz., Large 13 oz., Extra Large 14 oz.
  • Please refer to Kahtoola sizing chart included in product images. 2 Year Warranty. Shoes not included.

NewDoar Climbing Harness Safety Harness Half Body Harness Momentum HarnessFor Mountaineering Rock Climbing,Mountaineering Outward Band Fire Rescue,Expanding Training,Rappelling Gear Black

NewDoar Climbing Harness Safety Harness Half Body Harness Momentum HarnessFor Mountaineering Rock Climbing,Mountaineering Outward Band Fire Rescue,Expanding Training,Rappelling Gear Black
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

Rock Climbing Safety: Frequently Overlooked Things that May Just Kill You

It is often the small mundane details that can do the most harm precisely because they are small and therefore escape our attention. This article covers three of these traps.

A gradual desensitization to the apparent dangers as well as a good deal of rationalization goes on in the mind of a free soloist. Some of the rationalizations are correct while others are nothing more than psychological props. I know this because I used to be addicted to free solo rock climbing. I did this fairly routinely over a span of about five years without incident. Throughout this period I was very active in roped climbing as well. After a while I simply didn't feel like doing the free soloing anymore and just stopped.

What I found interesting in the forum thread were the arguments that roped climbers are often unknowingly exposing themselves to a good deal of risk. This is certainly true and the rest of this article will discuss some of the dangerous 'lapses' that happen on a daily basis among many climbers everywhere.

1.) A Distraction at the wrong time can be deadly.

When you put on your climbing harness and tie into the rope, does this task have your full attention? Or are you in a distracted state. If you are multitasking, daydreaming or engaged in an intense conversation, you are in a distracted state of mind. If you habitually do this, there is a good chance that someday you will start your climb with your harness halfway on or your rope only partially tied into your harness.

Distraction can also occur when you're in a state of high emotional arousal. If a bee stings you while you are tying into your rope or if you get into a very emotional argument with your climbing partner, then make sure to double check that your harness is on correctly and that you're properly tied into the rope.

Also, when you begin tying into the rope, always complete this task before doing something else. If you stop what you're doing, you may never finish tying in.

Distraction can also be deadly when starting a rappel. Because rappels are easy to do and occur after the completion of a climb when you are tired or are in a very relaxed state, it is easy to get complacent. There is a high occurrence of rappelling accidents, yet rappelling is a ridiculously simple task to do.

2.) Just how stable is your belay setup?

The forces generated on a rope can be very large when arresting a falling climber. The next time you're belaying your partner, imagine a force of several hundred pounds yanking you in the direction of the rope. Will you still be standing (or sitting in the same position) afterwards? Will you still be holding on to the belay device? If you are perched on a very small ledge, this is a very important consideration. There should be no slack between you and your anchors. Your belay device should be 'facing' in the direction of the anticipated force.

This type of lapse can occur out of ignorance as in the case of beginner and even intermediate climbers who haven't yet experienced the violence of stopping long falls. It can also occur when the climber that you are belaying is out of your line of sight and is taking forever to complete the pitch. This is when the 'out of sight, out of mind' mentality tends to kick in.

I've witnessed situations in which the belayer was belaying with one hand and was facing in the wrong direction. If a violent fall had occurred, the rope could have been ripped out of his hands and the falling climbing partner would have continued his fall. I have seen belayers at the top of a cliff with so much slack in their anchor lines that they were in danger of being yanked over the edge of the cliff.

3.) Are your protection placements real or imaginary?

When you first start 'trad' climbing (where you have to put in your own protection) you have no sense of judgement about how effective your protection really is until you've tested them with some real force. Until you actually know what you can get away with, you should be fairly conservative. Wedge type devices in the smaller size ranges should have maximum surface contact with the rock. I've found out the hard way that a tiny aluminum wedge pinched between two tiny rock crystals is not adequate. Ideally, the taper of the crack should match the taper of the wedge as much as possible.

With spring loaded camming devices, there is an ideal angle between the cams that you'd like to not stray too far from. Also, spring loaded cams are less effective on soft rock. If you are used to using these devices in granite, your placements in sandstone will be different. The device should be deeper in the crack and the cams have to be pulled closer together. Larger cams are more trust worthy than smaller cams.

These three points are very mundane and boring, often overlooked by beginners and intermediates. Even advanced climbers can slip into complacency, especially if they've been climbing for years without incident and therefore have no reason to reevaluate their practices.

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