10 Best Metalworking & Multipurpose Drill Bits

List Updated May 2020

Bestselling Metalworking & Multipurpose Drill Bits in 2020


Chicago Latrobe 157 Series High-Speed Steel Short Length Drill Bit Set with Metal Case, Bright Finish, 118 Degree Conventional Point, Letter Size, 26-piece, A - Z

Chicago Latrobe 157 Series High-Speed Steel Short Length Drill Bit Set with Metal Case, Bright Finish, 118 Degree Conventional Point, Letter Size, 26-piece, A - Z
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020
  • Set of 26 short length drill bits includes one each of letter sizes A through Z
  • High-speed steel (HSS) provides hardness for wear resistance
  • Uncoated (bright) finish is an untreated surface that can be used on a range of materials, especially soft metals
  • 118-degree conventional point for a range of drilling applications
  • Short length drill bits have the strength and rigidity required for heavy-feed rate applications
  • Made in the USA

Precision Twist C29M40CO Cobalt Steel Short Length Drill Bit Set with Metal Case, Bronze Oxide Finish, 135 Degree Split Point, Inch, 29 piece, 1/16" to 1/2" x 64ths

Precision Twist C29M40CO Cobalt Steel Short Length Drill Bit Set with Metal Case, Bronze Oxide Finish, 135 Degree Split Point, Inch, 29 piece, 1/16
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • Set of 29 short length drill bits includes inch sizes 1/16" through 1/2" in 1/64" increments
  • Cobalt steel provides extended tool life compared to high-speed steel drill bits when drilling hard materials
  • Gold oxide finish lubricates and provides wear resistance on ferrous materials
  • Self-centering 135-degree split point penetrates hard material without a pilot hole and produces small chips to reduce clogging
  • Drill bits conform to ANSI standards

wynn’s Hand Drill Set Precision Pin Vise with 25 Pieces Micro Mini Twist Drill Bits for Model, Hobby, DIY, Jewelry Making, Multipurpose Rotary Tool Drilling Tool for Metal, Wood, Plastic etc

wynn’s Hand Drill Set Precision Pin Vise with 25 Pieces Micro Mini Twist Drill Bits for Model, Hobby, DIY, Jewelry Making, Multipurpose Rotary Tool Drilling Tool for Metal, Wood, Plastic etc
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020

Hi-Spec 47 Piece Multi Purpose Drill Bit Set with HSS Steel Bits, Masonry Drill Bits, Wood Drill Bits, Wood Spade Drill Bits, Hole Saws, Hex Nuts, Slotted, Phillips & Pozi Screw Bits

Hi-Spec 47 Piece Multi Purpose Drill Bit Set with HSS Steel Bits, Masonry Drill Bits, Wood Drill Bits, Wood Spade Drill Bits, Hole Saws, Hex Nuts, Slotted, Phillips & Pozi Screw Bits
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020

Contineo 10pcs Single Cut Tungsten Steel Solid Carbide Rotary Burrs Set with 1/8(3mm) Shank Twist Drill Bit for Dremel Rotary Tools for Woodworking Drilling Carving Engraving

Contineo 10pcs Single Cut Tungsten Steel Solid Carbide Rotary Burrs Set with 1/8(3mm) Shank Twist Drill Bit for Dremel Rotary Tools for Woodworking Drilling Carving Engraving
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

Domeiki 115pc HSS Drill Bit Set w/ Case Multipurpose Lengths Metalworking Wood Carpentry

Domeiki 115pc HSS Drill Bit Set w/ Case Multipurpose Lengths Metalworking Wood Carpentry
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • Domeiki specializes in providing quality tools at affordable prices. Everything we sell ships right here from our Los Angeles warehouse.
  • Any return must be in the same condition it was delivered, new & unused, and in the original packaging. All return costs are the responsibility of the buyer. If an item was damaged during shipping, we may require photos to help expedite the return process. It may just be a matter of sending out a replacement part.
  • Customer satisfaction is our goal.
  • Product detailed data refer to product description

29 Piece Cobalt M-42 Metal Index Drill Bit Set 29Pc Drill Bit Industrial Set-Cobalt M42

29 Piece Cobalt M-42 Metal Index Drill Bit Set 29Pc Drill Bit Industrial Set-Cobalt M42
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • Hanson
  • 29 Piece Cobalt M-42 Metal Index Drill Bit Set
  • 161787

Chicago Latrobe 150 Series High-Speed Steel Jobber Length Drill Bit Set with Metal Case, Black Oxide Finish, 118 Degree Conventional Point, Inch, 21-piece, 1/16" - 3/8" in 1/64" increments

Chicago Latrobe 150 Series High-Speed Steel Jobber Length Drill Bit Set with Metal Case, Black Oxide Finish, 118 Degree Conventional Point, Inch, 21-piece, 1/16
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020
  • Set of 21 jobber length drill bits includes inch sizes 1/16" through 3/8" in 1/64" increments
  • High-speed steel (HSS) provides hardness for wear resistance
  • Black oxide finish reduces bit wear while promoting chip and coolant flow on ferrous material
  • 118-degree conventional point for a range of drilling applications
  • Jobber length drill bit has a midrange drilling depth suitable for general-purpose drilling applications
  • Made in the USA

Artu - 13-Pc. Multi-Purpose Drill Bit Set

Artu - 13-Pc. Multi-Purpose Drill Bit Set
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • Multi-Purpose Drill Bit For Rotary or Percussion Drilling
  • For use on Glass, Granite, Plexiglass, Marble, Ceramic Tile, Fiberglass, Cast Metal, Brick, Hardened Steel, Masonry, Soft Wood, Concrete, Hard Wood.
  • Chrome vanadium steel shank for enormous strength and flexibility. Ideal for cordless drills, corded drills and drill presses.
  • Flat bottom parabolic flute for faster waste removal. Special negative back grinding enables the tip to bore through materials with a filing action, not cutting.
  • Outlasts regular carbide tipped bits. No center punch needed, eliminates walking. Resharpen on a high quality silicon carbide grinding wheel. Conforms to ANSI standards. Coolants: turpentine, light oil, water.

Pin Vise Hand Drill Bits(20PCS), Micro Mini Twist Drill Bits Set with Precision Hand Pin Vise Rotary Tools for Wood, Jewelry, Plastic etc (0.6-3.0mm)

Pin Vise Hand Drill Bits(20PCS), Micro Mini Twist Drill Bits Set with Precision Hand Pin Vise Rotary Tools for Wood, Jewelry, Plastic etc (0.6-3.0mm)
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

The Backyard Blacksmith: Building Your Own Forge

Most blacksmiths these days are just hobbyists although a few die-hard masters still create beautiful works of hand-crafted art. If you are interested in metalworking, forges and fires, blacksmithing may just be for you.

The first thing that comes to mind when I think of a blacksmith forge is the ringing of the anvil. I have personally served as an apprentice blacksmith to a veteran master of over 60 years. In less than a year, I earned my right to produce my own products and make my own touch stamp. During this time, I soaked up as much knowledge as I could and one of the biggest debates among modern blacksmiths is coal or gas.

Coal: The classic blacksmith fuel. Coal is readily available in my area and it's very inexpensive. This, combined with the nostalgia of classical forging caught my eye immediately. The roar of the fire pit, the glow of the coals and the heat of the forge drew me in and I became biased to coal. Although coal is the classical fuel, many amateur and master smiths alike use gas because of it's usability. I once asked my master about coal versus gas and he laughed, telling me that half of his time is spent tending his coal fires. This is true, you have to keep enough oxygen flowing into the coals, you have to continually pour in new coals and remove debris (clinker) as well as develop an eye for watching your steel. Watching your steel is vital because it's remarkably easy to burn your steel and ruin the piece you've been working on for hours and potentially days.

Gas: When the price of propane started to drop and become really available for consumer use, the backyard blacksmith began to have this option open to them. With propane, the burner is constantly kept at the desired temperature, metal never burns and becomes ruined and more time can be spent working the metal instead of tending the fire. With propane it's as simple as turning on the burner and heating the steel. Although it is much cleaner than coal and generally easier to use, the gas does have it's own downside as well. You go through a lot of propane, an awful lot of propane when your building something intricate. Burners can become damaged over time, misfires can happen and I've personally seen a gas forge be improperly built and explode.

While the classical debate between coal and gas is a heated topic among enthusiasts and professionals alike, what is universally agreed upon is that to do the job correctly, you have to have the correct tools.

Hammers: Hammers are essential to the blacksmith and having the correct hammer for the correct job is equally crucial. My personal favorite hammer is the double faced steel sledge. The one I use is a 6lb steel sledge with a 14 inch wooden handle. Most if not all of my work is done with this hammer, although I do use cross peins and ball peins when they are needed. When selecting hammers the single most important factor you should consider when buying is comfort. Does the hammer fit well in your hand? Will you be able to lift that hammer a hundred times in a row while holding nearly white-hot metal? These are just some of the questions that you need to ask yourself about your first hammer. Remember to take your time and weigh the options (literally!) to find the right hammer for you.

Tongs: Tongs are what you use to hold the steel while it is hot and how to remove it from the fire. There are thousands of different types of tongs with heads that fit angled iron, round bar, square stock and custom pieces. One thing that I've noticed among most amateurs is that they get all of the fanciest tongs that they can find and fill up their tool wracks with everything under the sun, not knowing they they need only a few basics to cover their needs. As mentioned before, angled, round, square, odd and flat tongs are really all you need. Two of each with short and long handles are really it. I've seen an amateur smith spend $8,000 on tools, only to have them sit and gather dust in his shop because he only uses a select few. If you find yourself needing new tongs after you purchase the basics mentioned above, why don't you just make your own? It's a great first project and there are multiple resources out there to show you how.

Gloves: Alright, this is going to be a controversial topic. Never ever use a glove on your hammer hand, it can cause slipping and dull your feeling of the rebound of the hammer. When using a glove on your other hand, make sure you chose a glove that's made of natural materials. Synthetics will melt when hot and they can cause extremely painful burns when they turn to goo and melt into your skin. Leather is, in my opinion, the only way to go. Cowhide gloves are inexpensive and incredibly durable, resistant to heat and they have the added bonus of giving off a distinct odor when you're getting too close to the flame. The best gloves that I've found are honestly a pair of yellow cowhide gloves I bought from my local Lowes.

Safety Gear: Eye protection is an absolute must. Be sure to pick a pair of goggles that cover your eyes completely and wrap around, you don't want sparks or debris to fly under your glasses and blind you. Ear plugs, good quality and preferably custom fit, are also essential to a backyard blacksmith. I've known master smiths who are as deaf as a stone because of the ringing of their anvils over the years. High decibel ringing will cause you permanent damage after prolonged exposure, so take the necessary preventative measures.

Anvil: I can't stress enough how important it is to find a high quality anvil if you are serious about doing any major work. While they are incredibly expensive for new ones, you can easily find used ones laying around most antique shops and these have the added benefit of being sturdy, weathered and well seasoned to temperatures. Unfortunately, anyone with an anvil that is not a smith generally has absolutely no idea how to take care of them and they are usually riddled with holes, scratches, pits and other horrible deformations that make the mass of available anvils completely useless to an aspiring smith. If you can't quite afford a new anvil and you don't find any worth keeping at the local shops, you can always use a piece of rail-road rail. I know this sound silly, but it honestly works as a substitute. If you get a nice piece that's kept fairly well over the years, you'll be pounding away in no time.

While the above list is by no means exhaustive, it should provide amateur smiths with enough equipment to get started with their blacksmith career. However, while having all the tools in the world is really fun and exciting, it's pretty much useless if you don't have a correct workspace set up for your actual metal work.

If you are building a coal forge, the following guide will serve as a starting point to the development of your own forge. I'm not going to cover gas forges because you can easily buy an already built gas forge and start almost immediately.

When considering coal, you have to do some serious planning and blueprinting in order to make it comfortable. One thing you have to keep in mind is the height of the forge, you want it to stay almost level with your anvil and you also want it to be sized to fit you. The easiest way to size the height is to hold your hammer in your fist at your side, with your knuckles pointed at the floor, that height is where the top of your fire bricks should be.

If you are planning on making your own forge and furnace set up, you can rest assured that you can find most of the building materials at your local hardware store. Aside from the firebrick and the fire pots, everything else is just standard building material. This is the material list for a triple forge that my master and I built, it's unique and none other like it in the world. I won't share the blueprints or design features, but I'll describe it in as much detail as I can.

The triple forge design is a triangle shape with three, 3ft forge surfaces with fire pots centered in each. They are 3 and ½ foot off the ground and they were built with 2x4's, concrete and plywood. We built cases for a 6 inch foot jutting out and then built the cases up to fill a concrete table surface.

Once everything was filled with concrete, we used a vibrating drill head to settle the bubbles and then we drove reinforcement bar down into all three feet as well as laying out a grid in the table tops. When everything set up and was complete, we built our own massive iron hood with custom scrolling and designs that we vented up into the roof. The direct-draft approach pulls out enough smoke and fumes that we barely notice all three forges going at full burn.

With simple planning and some basic carpentry skills, you can build your own indoor or outdoor forge easily and quickly. Once you've got your forge up and running, your tools stocked and your anvil ready, I suggest you either find a master to work with as an apprentice or just grab some books at your local library and try it out.

All in all, being a blacksmith has been both rewarding and inspiring.

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