13 Best Men's Contemporary & Designer Boxer Briefs

List Updated March 2020

Bestselling Men's Contemporary & Designer Boxer Briefs in 2020


Original Penguin Men's Cotton Stretch Fashion 3 Pack Boxer Brief, Rio Red Stripe Faded Denim pete Medieval Blue, M

Original Penguin Men's Cotton Stretch Fashion 3 Pack Boxer Brief, Rio Red Stripe Faded Denim pete Medieval Blue, M
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020
  • Includes one stripe one pete print and one solid
  • Elastic waistband

Diesel Men's 3-Pack Shawn Stretch Boxer Trunk, Royal Blue/Burgundy/Navy, Medium

Diesel Men's 3-Pack Shawn Stretch Boxer Trunk, Royal Blue/Burgundy/Navy, Medium
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • Diesel logo waistband
  • 3 pack

Original Penguin Men's 3 Pack Button Boxer Briefs, White, Small

Original Penguin Men's 3 Pack Button Boxer Briefs, White, Small
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • Functional key fly
  • Penguin logo repeat on wasteland
  • Tag less seamless

Original Penguin Men's 2-Pack Classic Earl Boxer Brief, Black, Large

Original Penguin Men's 2-Pack Classic Earl Boxer Brief, Black, Large
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • Boxer brief
  • Cotton stretch boxer brief

Original Penguin Men's Boxer Brief, Dark Sapphire King, X-Large

Original Penguin Men's Boxer Brief, Dark Sapphire King, X-Large
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • Penguin logo repeat on waistband
  • Tag less
  • Seamless

Hugo Boss Men's Boxer Brief 24 Logo, Red, XX-Large

Hugo Boss Men's Boxer Brief 24 Logo, Red, XX-Large
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • Made in Turkey

Original Penguin Men's Pete Arglye Boxer Brief, Dark Denim Argyle, Medium

Original Penguin Men's Pete Arglye Boxer Brief, Dark Denim Argyle, Medium
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • Penguin logo repeat on waistband
  • Tag less
  • Seamless

Hugo Boss Men's Boxer Brief 2p Print, Multi, Large

Hugo Boss Men's Boxer Brief 2p Print, Multi, Large
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020
  • Made in Sri Lanka

Hugo Boss BOSS Men's Boxer Brief 24 Logo, Dark Blue, L

Hugo Boss BOSS Men's Boxer Brief 24 Logo, Dark Blue, L
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • Exposed waistband featuring center placed BOSS HUGO BOSS logo
  • Double layered crotch for enhanced support

Hugo Boss BOSS Men's 3-Pack Cotton Boxer Brief, New Grey/Charcoal/Black, Medium

Hugo Boss BOSS Men's 3-Pack Cotton Boxer Brief, New Grey/Charcoal/Black, Medium
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • Refined waistband
  • 100 percent cotton

Original Penguin Men's Single Novelty Boxer Brief, Medieval Swedish Blue, XL

Original Penguin Men's Single Novelty Boxer Brief, Medieval Swedish Blue, XL
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020
  • 95 percent cotton 5 percent spandex
  • Elastic waistband

Original Penguin Men's Printed Waistband Boxer Brief, Burnt Olive, Medium

Original Penguin Men's Printed Waistband Boxer Brief, Burnt Olive, Medium
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020
  • Penguin logo repeat on waistband
  • Tag less
  • Seamless

Original Penguin Men's Diamond Pete Boxer Brief, Blue Bell, Large

Original Penguin Men's Diamond Pete Boxer Brief, Blue Bell, Large
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020
  • Penguin logo repeat on waistband
  • Tag less
  • Seamless

Mystery Novel Briefs:

Some comments on nine recently published, popular novels often categorized in the mystery section of book stores and libraries.

Next, let's look at "The Tea-Olive Bird Watching Society" (2005) by Augusta Trobaugh. This one is a murder mystery only in the sense that it keeps you wondering if a murder will actually take place. The ladies of Tea-Olive, Georgia, are polite, conservative, proud of their land, socially active, very close-knit, and avid birders. When a retired judge moves into town, he upsets the placid community by marrying a local spinster and purchasing a bull. The spinster is a meek member of the society and the bull presents a challenge to another member, who seeks to free the beast in an ill-advised attempt on the judge's life. The judge eventually passes away but the circumstances, appearing accidental, are wide open to speculation. This quiet mystery is one that sneaks up on you just as you think you might tire of small-town Georgia.

Clare Curzon's "The Glass Wall" (2005) features a mixed cast of characters, from police, doctors, lawyers, nurses, patients, and young truants to a bedridden nonagenarian, her ill-intentioned heirs, a fired court usher turned repossession agent, and a Filipino immigrant. The puzzle in this one is not whether someone will be murdered but who actually was murdered and by whom, as well as questions about who moved the body the first time and then the second time. And the not-so-bedridden nonagenarian has a great art collection to boot!

For something more exotic, let's look at Qiu Xinolong's "A Case of Two Cities," (2020) with Shanghai and St. Louis being the cities in question, although there is also a sojourn in Los Angeles. Inspector Chen juggles political influences while investigating a major corruption case and, incidentally, a murder or two. Chen, a published poet in addition to being a high-ranking police officer, deals with most situations by recalling to mind poetry excerpts. Although Chen's maneuvers in the murky world of Chinese bureaucracy are fascinating, his failure to put real faces on those guilty for the murders is a distinct shortcoming. However, followers of this series will undoubtedly appreciate this update on Chen's career.

For another big-city crime novel, let's try "Murder on K Street" (2020) by Margaret Truman. In this one, the wife of a U.S. senator is found murdered. A boyhood friend of the senator is among those taking a close interest in the case. Possible involvement of a big-time firm of lobbyists complicates this political hot potato, especially since the senator's son works for the lobbying firm. This rather tangled story is nonetheless believable, with plenty of inside-the-beltway detail. And, best of all, a dog turns out to be a hero in the thriller-style ending.

French author Fred Vargas' "This Night's Foul Work" (2020) finds Commissaire Adamsberg piecing together a puzzle involving deer poaching, accidental deaths that may not be so accidental, street murders, grave robbing, relic snatching, ghosts, and prison escapes. Meanwhile, a new recruit joins the Paris-based murder squad and he turns out to be a potential enemy from Adamsberg childhood. This sprawling novel is held together by Adamsberg, a heads-in-the-cloud leader who follows his instincts and intuition or possibly just the clouds. Amazingly, it is a cat that eventually solves the case and saves a key squad member, the redoubtable Violette Retancourt. Word to the wise: watch out for the too-helpful pathologist.

Elmore Leonard's "Up in Honey's Room," (2020) sets up as a 1940's noir novel complete with escaped German POWs, spies, lawmen, and a uniquely modern woman, Honey Deal, who pretty much overwhelms everyone she meets. This great story is more a period thriller and not really a murder mystery. But there are wonderfully drawn characters to meet, including a murderous Ukrainian, an wisecracking U.S. marshal, black-market cattle rustlers and meat butchers, plus two clever and personable Germans who are supposed to be in an Oklahoma prison camp. And then there is Honey, who pretty much does what she wants and always turns out a winner.

A serial killer case returns to worry Chicago detective lieutenant Jacqueline "Jack" Daniels in "Rusty Nail" (2020) by J.A. Konrath. The killer may be a copycat or else a relative of the killer finished off by Jack in the previous novel in this series named for popular cocktails. Causing additional confusion is a TV series which features Jack's character, unflatteringly portrayed; life-threatening health problems plaguing her police partner Sergeant Benedict; and wedding prospects for a former partner, now a private investigator, Harry McBride, whose fiance Holly Flakes is a crack shot. What's more, Jack's old boyfriend shows up, once again to face mayhem and death in a thrill-ride ending. This story has some rather gruesome details and showcases some truly insane characters but is definitely in the fast-paced, quick-read category.

Lastly, let's check out a dour Russian setting brightened by the psychic deductions and seemingly pessimistic insights of senior Moscow police investigator Arkady Renko, who frustrates the illusions of hysterics bent on seeing the specter of the former dictator in "Stalin's Ghost" (2020) by Martin Cruz Smith. Political motivations and war-crime cover-ups account for assorted gratuitous murders and the general mood of paranoia. American promoters help stage rallies and guide TV "visuals" while the candidate tries to whitewash the past and confound suspicious investigators. Renko's girlfriend Eva is a player, being a Ukrainian affected by Chernobyl radiation and a doctor familiar with service in Chechnya. Isakov, the bad guy, is shown up as a weakling and not a war hero. Meanwhile, Renko's ward Zhenya, a chess genius at age 12, both manages to get Renko shot in the head and to save Renko and Eva from a crazed, knife-wielding killer in this complicated and character-rich story. Mass graves, old motorcycles, chess moves, and childhood memories fill out this absorbing novel which covers a lot of ground but manages to feel authentic and not contrived.

These nine recommendations for leisure-time reading are all available at many libraries, larger bookstores, and online retailers. Several are installments in continuing series by celebrated authors; so, you may wish to catch up on the earlier novels in addition to enjoying these relatively recent, entertaining, and well-written selections.

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