13 Best Medieval Thought Philosophy

List Updated July 2020

Bestselling Medieval Thought Philosophy in 2020


Medieval Philosophy (Dover Books on Western Philosophy)

Medieval Philosophy (Dover Books on Western Philosophy)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

Medieval Thought (History of Western Philosophy)

Medieval Thought (History of Western Philosophy)
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Medieval Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary

Medieval Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Medieval Philosophy (Etienne Gilson Series)

Medieval Philosophy (Etienne Gilson Series)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Medieval Philosophy: An Historical and Philosophical Introduction

Medieval Philosophy: An Historical and Philosophical Introduction
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

Medieval Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)

Medieval Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • Oxford University Press

Medieval Philosophy (A New History of Western Philosophy, Vol. 2)

Medieval Philosophy (A New History of Western Philosophy, Vol. 2)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • Clarendon Press

Medieval Philosophy as Transcendental Thought: From Philip the Chancellor (Ca. 1225) to Francisco Suárez (Studien Und Texte Zur Geistesgeschichte Des Mittelalters)

Medieval Philosophy as Transcendental Thought: From Philip the Chancellor (Ca. 1225) to Francisco Suárez (Studien Und Texte Zur Geistesgeschichte Des Mittelalters)
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

Leo Strauss and the Recovery of Medieval Political Philosophy (Rochester Studies in Medieval Political Thought)

Leo Strauss and the Recovery of Medieval Political Philosophy (Rochester Studies in Medieval Political Thought)
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020

Islamic Philosophy: A Beginner's Guide (Beginner's Guides)

Islamic Philosophy: A Beginner's Guide (Beginner's Guides)
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • Oneworld Publications

The Great Tours: Experiencing Medieval Europe

The Great Tours: Experiencing Medieval Europe
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020
  • Manufacturer's warranty only when purchased from The Great Courses

Fragments Of The Lost Writings Of Proclus

Fragments Of The Lost Writings Of Proclus
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020
  • Jump between chapters and sub-chapters
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  • High-quality, full-edition book with no advertisements
  • Read in portrait or landscape mode

Aquinas (A Beginner's Guide)

Aquinas (A Beginner's Guide)
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020
  • One of the most influential philosophers and theologians in history, St. Thomas Aquinas was the fath

How to Begin Thinking Critically

Basic critical thinking skills taught and supplemented with references from the history of philosophy.

1. Be Aware of Your Own Assumptions
We make assumptions all of the time, many of which may be required to abide in life in a practical manner. Some such assumptions include the idea that placing one's hand in a flame will produce pain and that leaping from a tall building will cause death. These are sound assumptions.

Other assumptions are made that may not be quite so necessary. These often take the form of conventions.

2. Be Wary of Assumptions
"Segregation now, segregation tomorrow, and segregation forever!" This was George Wallace's credo upon delivering his 1963 inauguration speech as governor of Alabama. It is an example of an implicit assumption, based upon a provincial convention, that's not necessary (nor desirable) but has been assumed as such.

This variety of assumption dictates that "ought" follows from "is." Wallace's "appeal" is to the human weakness for presuming that present practices or values are necessary, good and true merely because they have been accepted for a long period.

3. Highlight Assumptions
Learn to spot them almost reflexively. Note any assumptions you uncover and expose them to others, especially if they are related to social or political practices.

4. Follow Nietzche's Advice
The 19th Century philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche wrote a book called Twilight of the Idols, which was subtitled "How One Philosophizes With a Hammer." He refers to philosophizing with a hammer "as with a tuning fork". Idols (for our purposes, broadly revered assumptions) are struck with the hammer, and listened to for hollowness or richness, and life-enhancing quality. Should such dogmas ring hollow, I think this is where the "hammer" part of the meaning follows the tuning fork aspect.

5. Debate Alternatives
Another 19th Century philosopher, John Stuart Mill, wrote a book, On Liberty, in which he included a chapter titled "Of the Liberty of Thought and Discussion." In this chapter, Mill defends thought and discussion (critical thinking and its dissemination) on the basis of four arguments.

A. That popular opinion might be wrong
B. That even if true, popular opinion undiscussed becomes "dead dogma"
C. True opinion undebated loses its meaning
D. Usually truth resides neither in one position nor its contrary, but rather someplace in between

Part "D" speaks to a tolerance of ambiguity and the courage to operate in gray areas, as opposed to "black and white" binaries.

Mill, John Stuart; On Liberty, '"Of the Liberty of Thought and Discussion"

Nietzsche, Friedrich; Twilight of the Idols

Tips amp; Warnings

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