13 Best Medical Law & Legislation

List Updated July 2020

Bestselling Medical Law & Legislation in 2020


Medical Law and Ethics (5th Edition)

Medical Law and Ethics (5th Edition)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

Medical Law: Text, Cases, and Materials

Medical Law: Text, Cases, and Materials
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • Oxford University Press, USA

Medical Law: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)

Medical Law: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020

The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation, 20th Edition

The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation, 20th Edition
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • Presents a guide for lawyers for constructing citations, covering the format of citations from a variety of legal sources, including court cases, statutes, books, periodicals, electronic media, and international documents.

Health Law and Medical Ethics

Health Law and Medical Ethics
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

Medical Law, Ethics, & Bioethics for the Health Professions

Medical Law, Ethics, & Bioethics for the Health Professions
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • F A Davis Company

Medical Law and Ethics (4th Edition)

Medical Law and Ethics (4th Edition)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

Nurse Practitioner's Business Practice and Legal Guide

Nurse Practitioner's Business Practice and Legal Guide
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020
  • Nurse Practitioner s Business Practice and Legal Guide

America's Bitter Pill: Money, Politics, Backroom Deals, and the Fight to Fix Our Broken Healthcare System

America's Bitter Pill: Money, Politics, Backroom Deals, and the Fight to Fix Our Broken Healthcare System
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • America s Bitter Pill Money Politics Backroom Deals and the Fight to Fix Our Broken Healthcare System

The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation

The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Medical Law, Ethics and Bioethics for Health Professions

Medical Law, Ethics and Bioethics for Health Professions
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020

New Jersey Medical Malpractice Law 2018

New Jersey Medical Malpractice Law 2018
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020

Essentials of Health Policy and Law (Essential Public Health)

Essentials of Health Policy and Law (Essential Public Health)
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020
  • Essentials of Health Policy and Law

Princeton Bio-Medical Ethics Professor Peter Singer Teaches Controversial Ethics

analysis of the teachings of Princeton Professor

Dr. Singer outlined his ideas with Dan Rather on a broadcast of CBS 60 Minutes. The mild-mannered Australian professor explained his teachings; they contain four basic principles:

It is acceptable and often even proper to euthanize terminally ill who have 'no consciousness' left. it is also right to terminate the lives of handicapped infants. The goal, according to Singer is to 'prevent families and the handicapped from future suffering. We've revisited this idea several times: Margaret Sanger and the Eugenics movement of the 1930's, Dr. Jack Kevorkian and his assisted suicides of the 1980's and 1990's. 'Not Dead Yet' is a lobbyist/activist group comprised of handicapped persons who speak and try to protect the rights of fellow handicapped citizens. They have rallied at Princeton to protest Dr. Singer's teaching of ethics as unethical. One NDY banner read 'Is Princeton to become a 'poison ivy' league school?

Animals suffer pain just as humans do and should not be allowed to. It is better to experiment on the terminally ill who have 'no consciousness' and will 'feel no pain' than to experiment on animals who feel pain. Dr. Singer has chained himself in stocks like an animal to show solidarity with pigs, cows and chickens who are often subjected to cruel and inhumane treatment on farms. Dr. Singer makes the point that if a person can't feel pain, it would be acceptable to perform tests on them.

We humans are selfish and would rather enjoy the good life than to help suffering and starving in the world. Dr. Singer gives 20% of his income off the top to world relief agencies. He tries to live as simply as possible. He admits he could do more. To listen to him, I had to conclude that this was his major theme. It seems to me that Dr. Singer is almost purposely suggesting some outrageous ideas to wake society up to the fact that although we claim to care about and respect life, our actions don't show it. We watch suffering, poverty, starvation and disease and make virtually no effort to alleviate it.

We should always think Golden Rule: Would I want this done to me?The teacher that I subbed for on Monday assigned me to watch and discuss 60 Minutes clip with his high school students. We had some very heated and interesting debate, as you might imagine. Perhaps as you read Dr. Singer's philosophy, you will, as the students and I did, notice some contradictions. First he suggests we allow our ill or handicapped loved ones to undergo testing, and asks if we would want it done to us

You can watch the 60 Minutes clip at CBS News for more information. Is Prof. Singer espousing Nazi thinking, which his parents worked so had to protect him from? Should Dr. Singer be allowed to continue to teach ethics at Princeton?

Related Bestselling Lists That You Might Like