10 Best Law Practice Reference

List Updated June 2020

Bestselling Law Practice Reference in 2020


Introduction to the Study and Practice of Law in a Nutshell (Nutshells)

Introduction to the Study and Practice of Law in a Nutshell (Nutshells)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

The Yale Law School Guide to Research in American Legal History (Yale Law Library Series in Legal History and Reference)

The Yale Law School Guide to Research in American Legal History (Yale Law Library Series in Legal History and Reference)
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020

Understanding Immigration Law and Practice (Aspen Coursebook)

Understanding Immigration Law and Practice (Aspen Coursebook)
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020

Special Education Law and Practice in Public Schools (2nd Edition)

Special Education Law and Practice in Public Schools (2nd Edition)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020

Ethical Problems in the Practice of Law, 3rd Edition (Aspen Casebook)

Ethical Problems in the Practice of Law, 3rd Edition (Aspen Casebook)
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

1000 Days to the Bar But the Practice of Law Begins Now, 2nd Edition

1000 Days to the Bar But the Practice of Law Begins Now, 2nd Edition
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020

Police Exams Prep 2018-2019: 4 Practice Tests + Proven Strategies (Kaplan Test Prep)

Police Exams Prep 2018-2019: 4 Practice Tests + Proven Strategies (Kaplan Test Prep)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

Education Law: Principles, Policies & Practice

Education Law: Principles, Policies & Practice
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Artificial Intelligence and Legal Analytics: New Tools for Law Practice in the Digital Age

Artificial Intelligence and Legal Analytics: New Tools for Law Practice in the Digital Age
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS

The Practice: Brutal Truths About Lawyers and Lawyering

The Practice: Brutal Truths About Lawyers and Lawyering
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

Double Standards - NBC Airs Veggie Tales

but cuts all references to God and The Bible.

Big Idea studios some years ago came up with a really BIG IDEA. They invented two characters… Bob the Tomato and Larry the Cucumber, and began telling stories in a format children could easily identify and comprehend. As more characters were added, and their 3-D animation began catching on and becoming more popular, more and more families became interested in Veggie Tales for their good morals. In my personal experience, I found Veggie Tales by checking a few videos out of the public library almost 5 years ago. My children from infancy up have grown up on Veggie Tales, intrigued at first, I believe, by the easily defined shapes and bright colors… and as they grew older grasping an understanding of how they are supposed to treat other people in the world we live in. Hearing the words, "God made you special, and loves you very much." I always felt was a wonderful way for the creators Mike Nawrocki and Phil Vischer to end the show. It was an affirmation for the children that they are indeed unique human beings, and that they are loved. With their Bible stories, verse at the end, and the closing affirmation, Big Idea Studios sold over 50 million copies of their Veggie Videos and DVD's to families through large chains such as Target, Wal-Mart, and chain Christian bookstores. There was no large marketing campaign, and these retailers took on the Big Idea products quietly. They've now expanded out into Larry-boy, a traditional 2-D animation cartoon, and 3-2-1 Penguins, as well as having a line of plush toys, games, coloring books, and other Veggie gear.

The producers in Hollywood and the larger networks made a mockery of Veggie Tales for it's Christian theme and traditional morals, even going so far as to exploit mock-ups of the characters on their animated reality show "Drawn Together". But recently NBC seems to have seen the advantages of taking on Veggie Tales… or have they?

NBC is the network that will justify the airing of a burlesque dancer costumed as Snow White in their "America's Got Talent" show during prime time, when families are coming together to spend time watching something entertaining. And they will defend the repeated use of expletives during an awards ceremony, as being protected but the First Amendment. NBC is also the network that seems to feel that mention of God and the Bible doesn't fall under the same protection. I mean… heaven… errmmm… political correctness forbid that families be allowed to promote good morals and family values to their children. As it stands Big Idea has had to slice off any references to the Bible… and has been told to discard the affirming conclusion of, "Remember kids, God made you special, and he loves you very much!"

People who are dissatisfied with having to send their children out of the room for what they deem inappropriate content during prime time… programming they pay for, I might add… are told that if the programming does not suit them, they have a remote control, and there are other channels to watch, or are encouraged to get a V-Chip. However it seems that does not apply to people who are uncomfortable with the mention of Christianity, God, or the Bible. Tell me THAT is not a double standard… and I will hold up a mirror to show you what a hypocrite looks like.

However some good may yet come of this, because after all it does allow Big Idea and Veggie Tales a chance to gain some exposure. Phil Vischer has expressed the hope that children will see Veggie Tales on Saturday mornings, fall in love with the characters, and then will want the full length videos and DVD's, which still presents an avenue for positive affirmation and Biblical teachings. In this regard, this can be a very good thing.

For those interested in allowing their children to watch Veggie Tales, it will be airing on Saturday mornings at 9 am CST.

Related Bestselling Lists That You Might Like