10 Best Lab Cell Culture Flasks

List Updated October 2020

Bestselling Lab Cell Culture Flasks in 2020


Celltreat 229510 Suspension Culture Flask with Vent Cap, Sterile, 50mL Volume (Case of 200)

Celltreat 229510 Suspension Culture Flask with Vent Cap, Sterile, 50mL Volume (Case of 200)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

Nest Scientific 708011 Polystyrene Cell Culture Flask, Plug Seal Cap, Non-Treated, Sterile, 75 cm², Clear, 5 per Pack, 100 per Case (Pack of 100)

Nest Scientific 708011 Polystyrene Cell Culture Flask, Plug Seal Cap, Non-Treated, Sterile, 75 cm², Clear, 5 per Pack, 100 per Case (Pack of 100)
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020

SPL Cell Culture Flask with Filter Cap, Tissue Culture Treated, Sterile, 25 cm², Clear, 5 per Pack, Case of 200

SPL Cell Culture Flask with Filter Cap, Tissue Culture Treated, Sterile, 25 cm², Clear, 5 per Pack, Case of 200
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020

Alkali Scientific TV0175 Cell Culture Flasks, Canted Neck, Vented with Filter Cap, Sterile and Tissue Culture Treated, 175 Square Centimeter Area, Volume of 750ml (Pack of 40)

Alkali Scientific TV0175 Cell Culture Flasks, Canted Neck, Vented with Filter Cap, Sterile and Tissue Culture Treated, 175 Square Centimeter Area, Volume of 750ml (Pack of 40)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • Short, wide canted neck allows easy access for serological pipettes and cell scrapers
  • Gamma Sterilized, Pyrogen Free, Sealed packs of 5
  • Crystal grade Polystyrene for high optical clarity with graduation marks and writing surface
  • Tissue Culture Treated for cell attachment
  • Flat wide surface allows maximum growth inside, and easy stacking of flasks to save space

Sterile Plastic Erlenmeyer Flasks for Cell Culture and Fermentation, 2L, Autoclavable Polycarbonate (PC), 53mm (53B) VersaCap, Baffled Bottom (Pack of 6)

Sterile Plastic Erlenmeyer Flasks for Cell Culture and Fermentation, 2L, Autoclavable Polycarbonate (PC), 53mm (53B) VersaCap, Baffled Bottom (Pack of 6)
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • Flasks and VersaCaps are autoclavable
  • Vented VersaCaps available
  • Sterility tested to SAL 10^-6
  • Molded in graduations
  • Sterile flasks are DNase/RNase-free and non-pyrogenic

Nalgene 4112-2000 PETG 2000mL Sterile Cell Culture/Erlenmeyer Flask (Case of 4)

Nalgene 4112-2000 PETG 2000mL Sterile Cell Culture/Erlenmeyer Flask (Case of 4)
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • 2000mL sterile, disposable, clear glycol-modified polyethylene terephthalate (PETG) Erlenmeyer flask with flat base for shaker and suspension cell culture, media preparation, or storage
  • High-density polyethylene (HDPE) leak-proof cap opens to vent with a quarter turn
  • Gamma-irradiated flask provides a five-year shelf life, a 1E-6 sterility assurance level (SAL), and is non-pyrogenic and non-cytotoxic
  • Measures 274.1mm high, with an outside diameter of 161.5mm at the widest part of the base and an inside diameter of 35.6mm at the neck
  • Molded-in graduated markings indicate approximate volume measurements in 200mL increments

Corning 431081 Sterile Cell Culture Flask, Angled Neck, 225 cm² Growth Area, Rectangular, Plug Seal Cap Type, 370 mL Working Volume, Orange

Corning 431081 Sterile Cell Culture Flask, Angled Neck, 225 cm² Growth Area, Rectangular, Plug Seal Cap Type, 370 mL Working Volume, Orange
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

SPL Cell Culture Flask with Filter Cap, Tissue Culture Treated, Sterile, 25 cm², Clear, Pack of 5

SPL Cell Culture Flask with Filter Cap, Tissue Culture Treated, Sterile, 25 cm², Clear, Pack of 5
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

Celltreat 229330 Tissue Culture Treated Flask, Plug Seal Cap, Sterile, 250mL Capacity, 25cm2 Size (Case of 200)

Celltreat 229330 Tissue Culture Treated Flask, Plug Seal Cap, Sterile, 250mL Capacity, 25cm2 Size (Case of 200)
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • Uniform hydrophilic surface is ideal for consistent cell attachment
  • Available in five sizes: 12.5, 25, 75, 182 and 300cm2
  • Canted neck design for easy access
  • Packaged sterile (gamma irradiated) in zip-closure bags

Nalgene 4113-0125 PETG 125mL Sterile Cell Culture/Erlenmeyer Flask (Case of 24)

Nalgene 4113-0125 PETG 125mL Sterile Cell Culture/Erlenmeyer Flask (Case of 24)
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • 125mL sterile, disposable, clear glycol-modified polyethylene terephthalate (PETG) Erlenmeyer flask with baffled base for shaker and suspension cell culture, media preparation, or storage
  • High-density polyethylene (HDPE) leak-proof cap opens to vent with a quarter turn
  • Gamma-irradiated flask provides a five-year shelf life, a 1E-6 sterility assurance level (SAL), and is non-pyrogenic and non-cytotoxic
  • Measures 112.8mm high, with an outside diameter of 66.3mm at the widest part of the base and an inside diameter of 26.4mm at the neck
  • Molded-in graduated markings indicate approximate volume measurements in 25mL increments

How to Make Plant Tissue Culture

Save money by making your own plant tissue culture. Use your culture to propagate your favorite plants.

Preparing the Medium

For 2 pints of medium, mix the following ingredients in a 1-quart home canning jar:

One half cup sugar

One tsp. all-purpose soluble fertilizer mixture. Check the label to make sure it has all of the major and minor elements, especially ammonium nitrate. If the latter is lacking, add one half tsp. of a 35-0-0 soluble fertilizer.

One tablet (100 mg) of inositol (myo­inositol), available at most health food stores

One fourth of a pulverized vitamin tablet that has 1-2 mg of thiamine

4 Tbsp. coconut milk (cytokinin source) drained from a fresh coconut. The remainder can be frozen and used later.

One fourth tsp of a commercial rooting compound

Fill the jar with distilled water. If purified water is not available, you may substitute water that has been boiled for several minutes. Shake the mixture and make sure all materials have dissolved.

Baby food jars with lids or other heat-resistant glass receptacles with lids can be used as individual culture jars. They should be half- filled with cotton or paper to support the plant material. Pour the medium into each culture bottle to the point where the support material is just above the solution.

When all bottles contain the medium and have the lids loosely screwed on, they are ready to be sterilized. Put them in a pressure cooker and sterilize under pressure for 30 minutes; or place in an oven at 3200 F for 4 hours. After remov­ing them from the sterilizer, place them in a clean area and allow the medium to cool. If the bottles will not be used for several days, wrap groups of culture bottles in foil before sterilizing and then sterilize the whole package. Then the bottles can be removed and cooled without removing the foil cover. Sterilized water, tweezers, and razor blades, which will be needed later, can be prepared in the same manner.

Disinfesting and Culturing Plants

Once the growing medium is sterilized and cooled, the plant material can be prepared for culture. Because plants usually harbor bacterial and fungal spores, they must be disinfested before they are placed in the sterile medium. Otherwise, bacteria and fungi may grow faster than the plants and may dominate the culture. Various plant parts can be cultured, but small, actively growing portions usually result in the most vigorous plantlets. 1/2 to 1 inch of the shoot tip is sufficient. Remove leaves attached to the tip and discard. Place the plant part into a solution of 1 part commercial bleach to 9 parts water for 8-10 minutes. Submerge all plant tissue in the bleach solution. After this time period, rinse off excess bleach by dropping the plant part into sterile water. Remember, once the plant material has been in the bleach, it has been disinfested and should only be touched with sterile tweezers.

After the plant material has been rinsed, remove any bleach ­damaged tissue with a sterile razor blade. Then remove the cap of a culture bottle containing sterile medium, place the plant part onto the support material in the bottle (making sure it is not completely submerged in the medium), and recap quickly.

Transferring should be done as quickly as possible in a clean environment. Therefore, scrub hands and counter tops with soap and water just before beginning to disinfest plant material. Rubbing alcohol or a dilute bleach solution can be used to wipe down the working surface.

After all plants have been cultured, place them in a warm, well-lit (no direct sunlight) environ­ment to encourage growth. If the medium has been contaminated, that should be obvious within three to four days. Remove and wash contaminated culture bottles as quickly as possible to prevent the spread to uncontaminated cultures.

When plantlets have grown to sufficient size, transplant them into soil. Handle as gently as possible because the plants are leaving a warm, humid environment for a cool, dry one. After transplanting, water the plants thoroughly and place in a clear plastic bag for several days. Gradually remove the bag to acclimate the plants to their new environment. Start with one hour per day and gradually increase time out of the bag over a two-week period until the plants are strong enough to dispense with the bag altogether.

Sources

Behe, B. 1989. Plant Propagation, Horticulture 202: Department of Horticulture, College of Agriculture. Department of Independent Learning, Penn State University, University Park, P A.

Browse, P.M. 1978. Plant Propaga­tion: Seeds, Roots, Bulbs and Corms, Layering, Stem Cuttings, Leaf Cuttings, Budding and Grafting. Simon and Schuster, New York.

Hartmann, H.T., D.E. Kester, and F.T. Davies. 1990. Plant Propaga­tion, Principles and Practices. 5th ed. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.].

Kramer, J. 1973. Grow Your Own Plants: from Seeds, Cuttings, Division, Layering, and Grafting. Scribners, New York.

Phillips, H.R. 1985. Growing and Propagating Wild Flowers. Univer­sity of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill.

Wright, J. 1983. Plant Propagation for the Amateur

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