13 Best Kids' Costume Masks

List Updated December 2022

Bestselling Kids' Costume Masks in 2022


Ecparty Superheros Cape and Mask Costumes Set Matching Wristbands For Kids (5 Sets)

Ecparty Superheros Cape and Mask Costumes Set Matching Wristbands For Kids (5 Sets)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2022
  • EVERY KID WANTS TO BE A SUPERHERO - Now it is possible! This set is perfect for children over 3 that want to pretend to be their favorite superheros during the day. Change into a different hero each day or have friends over for a costume party!
  • KID-FRIENDLY DESIGN AND MATERIALS - Masks are soft felt and easily adjustable to strap onto any size head. Kids can play comfortably with our double sided satin capes. Easy velcro neck strap set up, even your .
  • ENDLESS POSSIBILITIES FOR FUN - Capes can be worn outdoors as an everyday accessory. Bring out the set for a rainy day activity kit. All colors and pictures are made to match your child's entire Marvel / DC collection!
  • NO NEED TO SETTLE FOR LESS WITH OUR VALUE 5 SET - Other packs come with less than 4 heros. ECPARTY includes 5 different superheros so your youngster can have it all! We also include a FREE set of matching wrist bands for a complete 3 piece costume!
  • 100% SATISFACTION GUARANTEED -- If you are not absolutely thrilled with the reaction your young ones will get when they see this superhero dress-up set, simply send if back for a full refund. No questions asked! Risk free purchase!

SPESS Comics Cartoon hero 4Pcs Capes and Masks costumes for kids

SPESS Comics Cartoon hero 4Pcs Capes and Masks costumes for kids
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2022

RioRand Dress Up Costumes 5-Pack Cartoon Satin Capes Set With Felt Mask,slap bracelets and Exclusive Bag For Kids Boys

RioRand Dress Up Costumes 5-Pack Cartoon Satin Capes Set With Felt Mask,slap bracelets and Exclusive Bag For Kids Boys
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2022
  • 5-Pack value set: Cartoon capes set with 5pcs capes and masks,5pcs wristbands ,1 RioRand Exclusive Bag
  • Supreme design & lasting quality: the satin capes are silky to the touch, light and comfortable to wear
  • Mask Design:The mask is made of premium felt, easily adjustable to strap onto any size head
  • Imagination and creativity booster: let your child's imagination soar with this set of costumes - perfect for children who love to play their favorite style
  • Perfect for halloween, parties and birthdays: to state the obvious, this costume set is a perfect gift for your little baby

RioRand Cartoon Dress Up Costumes Satin Capes With Felt Masks and Exclusive Bag For Kids - 5pcs

RioRand Cartoon Dress Up Costumes Satin Capes With Felt Masks and Exclusive Bag For Kids - 5pcs
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2022
  • Durable double sided satin, easy velcro neck for children
  • The Capes Size is roughly 27"27", Masks measure approximately 6 1/2" wide and 3" to 4 1/2" tall (depending on style)
  • Set of 5 Capes & 5 Masks &1 RioRand Exclusive Bag.For Boys Ages 18 months - 8 years old / One Size
  • The mask is made of premium felt, easily adjustable to strap onto any size head
  • Great gift for all occasions,such as birthday party, dress-up occasions and wonderful Halloween

PJ Masks Costumes For Kids Catboy Owlette Gekko Mask Cape Bracelet

PJ Masks Costumes For Kids Catboy Owlette Gekko Mask Cape Bracelet
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2022
  • Supreme design & lasting quality: the satin capes are silky to the touch, light and comfortable to wear
  • One size - perfect for kids 3-8 years of age. size approximately 27" tall by 27" wide. Mask measures 6 1/2" wide and 3 - 4 1/2" tall (depending on Style).
  • Perfect gift for kids on birthday, Christmas, Halloween and role pretend play parties
  • This Hero set Suitable for Children Have fun Hours of Create their Imagination Being his/her Favorite Character.
  • 3 Capes 3 Masks 3 Bracelets

Rubies Star Wars Darth Vader Cape and Mask Set

Rubies Star Wars Darth Vader Cape and Mask Set
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2022
  • Darth Vader costume set with half mask featuring elastic back strap and cape measuring 38" long

PJ Masks Dress up Set Catboy, Blue

PJ Masks Dress up Set Catboy, Blue
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2022
  • Transform into your favorite night time hero, Catboy, with the ultimate PJ Masks Catboy Hero Dress Up Set! This set comes with a highly detailed full-body outfit, made of quality fabrics with Catboy's signature colors. Also included is a fabric mask allowing young fans to enjoy hours of fun as they play out their own PJ Masks adventures. Sizes 4-6X. Assortment includes Catboy, Owlette, and Gekko.
  • This set comes with a highly detailed full-body costume, made with quality fabrics in Catboy's signature colors.
  • Matching fabric mask included.
  • Collect all three Hero Dress Up Sets including Catboy, Owlette, and Gekko.
  • Each character sold separately.
  • Sizes 4-6X.
  • Ages 3+

Gekko Classic Toddler PJ Masks Costume, Large/4-6

Gekko Classic Toddler PJ Masks Costume, Large/4-6
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2022
  • Product Includes: Jumpsuit with detachable tail & soft headpiece
  • Headpiece included
  • Officially Licensed product

Mizzuco Cartoon Dress up Costumes Satin Capes with Felt Masks for Boys

Mizzuco  Cartoon Dress up Costumes Satin Capes with Felt Masks for Boys
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2022
  • Set of 8 capes & 8 masks, suitable for children 3-10 years old
  • Great for Halloween, superhero party, dress-up, more
  • Durable double sided satin, easy Velcro neck for young children
  • Is a perfect birthday present for children
  • Cute Nemo brand

Funhall Costumes and Dress up for Kids - Capes and Masks for Catboy Owlette Gekko

Funhall Costumes and Dress up for Kids - Capes and Masks for Catboy Owlette Gekko
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2022
  • It's Time To Be A Hero!
  • Velcro neck makes capes easy to put on and off
  • Durable double-sided satin capes and felt masks
  • One Size ( 27.5inch X 27.5inch ) - Suitable for children 3-10 years old
  • Perfect for Christmas, Halloween, Birthday Party and Dress-up Party

Catboy Classic Toddler PJ Masks Costume, Large/4-6

Catboy Classic Toddler PJ Masks Costume, Large/4-6
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2022
  • Product Includes: Jumpsuit with detachable tail & soft headpiece
  • Headpiece included
  • Officially Licensed product

Superhero Costume and Dress Up for Kids - Satin Cape and Felt Mask (Batman)

Superhero Costume and Dress Up for Kids - Satin Cape and Felt Mask (Batman)
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2022
  • It's Time To Be A Hero!
  • One size (27.5inch X 27.5inch), suitable for children 2-10
  • Velcro neck make cape easy to put on and off
  • Durable double-sided satin cape and felt mask
  • Perfect for Christmas, Halloween, Birthday Party and Dress-up Party

RioRand Cartoon Dress up Costumes Satin Capes Set with Felt Masks for Boys 5pcs (5pcs capes)

RioRand Cartoon Dress up Costumes Satin Capes Set with Felt Masks for Boys 5pcs (5pcs capes)
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2022
  • High Quality Materials: High quality materials featuring satin capes with vibrant colors and kids-friendly fabrics. They can be comfortably worn for long periods of time
  • Mask Design:The mask is made of premium felt, easily adjustable to strap onto any size head
  • The Capes Size is roughly 27"27", Masks measure approximately 6 1/2" wide and 3" to 4 1/2" tall (depending on style)
  • Great gift for all occasions,such as birthday party, dress-up occasions and wonderful Halloween
  • The Package Include: Cartoon capes set with 5pcs capes and 5pcs masks,1 Drawstring Backpack

Theatrical Costumes Throughout History

Costumes have played an integral part throughout the history of the theatre.

According to the late professor Joseph Campbell, theater derived out of myth and ritual. These rituals were used in an attempt to fulfill basic needs, such as pleasure, power, and duty (Robinson). Even during prehistoric times, when there was no formal theater, there were still costumes. Primitive tribes used masks and body paint to represent sacrificial animals. When African tribes did dance rituals, they would wear brightly colored garments and hunting coats (Brockett 4).

Theater as we know it originated with the ancient Greeks, who also had their share of costumes. Since the Greeks' stages were so far from the audiences, it was necessary that the actors wore exaggerated costumes and masks so that they could be seen. For example, the actors would wear thick boots called cothurnus, to make them taller. Gloves were worn, too, so that movements were noticeable. Additionally, the actors' entire heads were covered with masks made of linen or cork. The mask's shape amplified the actor's voice, so it was easier for the audience to hear. It also helped increase his stature ("Ancient Greek Theater").

The masks were necessary for another reason. Since women were not actors, it was the men's job to portray female characters. The masks hid masculine characters. To differentiate from the men's masks, the female masks had bigger eyes and larger mouths (Bates 39-42).

There were differences between the Greek tragic actors and the Greek comic actors' costumes, too. According to Oscar Brockett, some historians believe that the standard wear for the tragic actor consisted of a sleeved, full-length decorated tunic (24-25). This tunic may have been inspired by the robes of the Dionysian priests, or it may have been an invention by Aeschylus in the 5th century B.C. The exact origin of this garment is unknown. However, another source says that the tragic costumes varied, depending on the actor's role. The character of a god, hero, or old man wore a chiton. This was a "mantle of rich material descending to the ankles" (Bates 39-42). The Greeks' patron deities, such as Dionysus, wore saffron-colored pieces which glittered with stars, gold, and jewels. Those who played goddesses wore purple and gold garments. Royalty wore robes that swept the ground; warriors donned helmets and armor (Bates 39-42).

Comic costumes differed in a few ways from the tragic costumes. The chiton was still used, but it was shortened, intentionally made too tight, and worn over flesh colored leggings to represent comic nudity. Male characters sometimes wore a leather phallus (Brockett 26).

By the onset of Roman theater in the year 240 B.C.E., tragic costumes and masks had changed. However, the Romans used some of the same techniques as the Greeks. For instance, the tragic actor still wore boots, known to the Romans as kothornoi, to increase his size. Similarly, a high headdress known as an onkos was worn. Like the Greeks, the Roman actors wore masks (62-63).

Roman costumes varied, depending on the type of play. The Roman theater was much larger than the Greeks, and sometimes, it was hard to quiet the large audience. The Romans solved this problem by using certain costumes to fit each character. The masks differed by color; men wore brown ones and women white. However, women were still not allowed to act, so it would really be a man or a boy under the white mask. The signature garment of the Romans was a toga, a sash of approximately twenty feet long which was wrapped around the body. These togas varied in color depending on who the character was. There was a purple gown for a rich man, for example. Boys wore striped togas, soldiers wore short cloaks, and slaves wore short tunics (Mulvihill).

Roman mime actors had specific costumes, too. In addition to a tunic, they wore a hood called a ricinium. This hood was used to disguise the character. Some mimes wore patchwork jackets known as centunculus (Brockett 63).

After Rome fell in 600 A.D., a period known as the Dark Ages or Middle Ages began. The theater of this time is now known as medieval theater. Medieval theater was highly influenced by the Catholic Church, and the costumes of this period showed that. A lot of the costumes were probably just church vestments ("Medieval Theater"). For instance, an actor playing an angel would wear a church robe with wings attached. Sometimes the costumes resembled real life. An actor playing a soldier would wear armor and priests would wear the robes that Catholic prelates wore (Brockett 87-88).

Like previous time periods, the medieval times saw the use of masks. The characteristics of the masks were symbolic of good and evil. A heavenly being would have a mask coated in gold-leaf, which glistened with delight. Devils' masks were grotesque, being modeled after birds of prey or monsters with horns and tails (88).

The next period of theater, sixteenth and seventeenth century English theater, saw the reign of Queen Elizabeth and also the drama of William Shakespeare. Scenery and props were scarcely used then, so the main visual focus was the costuming. Elizabethan fashion was divided into five categories. "Ancient" was the term used to describe unfashionable, unstylish clothing, or clothing that was used to represent a different time period. "Antique" included drapery added to contemporary outfits, and this was used to costume characters playing classical figures. There were also fancy garments used for witches, fairies, and other supernatural characters, traditional costumes for characters like Robin Hood, and racial costumes which represented other ethnicities or nationalities (130).

While today the majority of our clothes are made out of cotton, at the time of the pre-cotton gin Elizabethan theater, this material was expensive and rare. Instead, costumes were made out of linen or wool. Satin may be used, but it was quite expensive. Additionally, since this was before the onset of synthetic dyes, if a garment was to be colored it would require extracting color from an insect. Purple dye was created by crushing thousands of sea snails; similarly, crimson dye came from crushing beetles ("Elizabethan Period Costumes").

Costumes of this time period were fancy. Women's outfits included corsets, bodices, petticoats, gowns and skirts. Long hair was braided. For men, boots, pants, vests known as jerkins, shirts, and hats were worn ("Overview of an Elizabethan Outfit"). Interestingly, the men's hats varied, depending on the social class the actor was portraying. An upper class hat, called a tall crown hat, was made of velvet or silk. The lower classes wore muffin caps, made of linen, similar to today's chef's hats. Popular makeup of this period included wearing a very white foundation base on the face along with red or ceruse on the lips and cheeks ("Elizabethan Clothing").

Next, there were the costumes of the Spanish theater period of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Like with the Middle Ages, a main source of inspiration for the Spanish theater was religion. There was a religious drama known as an auto sacramental or more simply, an auto (Brockett 140).The contract for these autos required that the actors wear silk or velvet costumes. Also, the actor was only allowed one costume per play. This may have been because the costumes were extravagant and very expensive. The actors dressed as fashionably as they could afford. One costume cost anywhere from one-fifth to one-half of the actor's annual income! The actor's wardrobe was used as an asset and even a bargaining tool. The better the outfits, the better the chance the actor would find employment (147-48).

In Italian theater of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries came a style known as commedia dell'arte. It consisted of loud, boisterous, often improvised comedy. The characters of this genre were called stock characters, meaning that the same characters appeared in each play. There were two different types of roles to play, the unmasked and the masked. The mask wearers were figures of fun or satire, whereas the unmasked played the roles of young lovers. The masks worn were colored and made of leather. As opposed to the Greek masks, the Italian masks only covered the eyes and not the entire head. This allowed the audience to see facial expressions. One of the commedia's stock characters was a zanni, or servant, named Arlecchino. He wore a black mask and a patchwork outfit ("Commedia dell' Arte"). A companion of Arlecchino was Brighella. He had a mask complete with hooked nose and mustache and he wore green trousers. Yet another masked character was an old man named Pantalone. Typically, his costume consisted of a red vest, red pants, stockings, slippers, an ankle-length coat, and a cap. His mask was brown and like Brighella's, had a hooked nose attached. Instead of a mustache, though, Pantalone's mask was donned with a curly grey beard (Brockett 179-80).

During this same time period, Italy's neighbor, France, also had a theater system set up. A popular French playwright, Moliere, influenced the French costuming to some degree. He was a supporter of using masks as symbolism. Moliere's characters would start off by wearing masks, and then would lose their masks to reveal their true character. His rationale behind this was that all human beings are masking some part of their identity. The removal of the mask allows the real personality to emerge (Arnaud).

Like the Spanish theater, King Louis XIV's reign saw fashion at a high point of extravagance. Costumes were made of silk, velvet, and brocade, embellished with lace and ribbons. This typical Victorian era dress included costly wigs, hats, headdresses with plumes of red feathers, red knee-high stockings, yellow gloves with gold fringe, and grey doublets with red lining ("Masks, Costumes, Ceremony Life In Seventeenth Century France"). Fortunately, to relieve the financial burden that these expensive garments presented, the actors were compensated well for their efforts (Brockett 205).

Throughout this course, we have studied several countries' contributions to theater. The similarities and differences between them are endless. For instance, most countries used masks. However, Greek masks covered the whole face while Italian masks merely covered the eyes. The countries all used glitz and glamour, but in different forms; animal dyes were used in England while gold-leaf was used in medieval theater and red feathers were used in France. Both Spain and France spent hefty amounts on their costumes, but the costumes in the Middle Ages were limited to simple church vestments.

In conclusion, all of these influences have inspired the unique phenomenon we experience in American culture. We have learned that costumes are essential to mankind and are present in many ways. We see prehistoric rituals and costumes in musicals like the acclaimed The Lion King. There are Shakespearean productions today filled with authentic, genre appropriate costumes. There is even a reference to Roman theater in today's colleges and universities, when fraternities hold toga parties ("Toga party"). Finally, of course, there is Halloween, when children of all ages dress up as their role models. So just remember next October, that when witches and ghosts ring your doorbell, they are not just looking for an excuse to rot their teeth with sweets. They are portraying a human need, by acting out the rituals we have learned from past cultures.

Works Cited

Alchin, L.K.. "Elizabethan Clothing." Elizabethan Era. 16 MAY 2005. 25 Jul 2020
"Ancient Greek Theater." Ancient Civilizations Index. 26 MAR 2020. Crystalinks. 25 Jul 2020 .
Arnaud, Danielle. "Costumes." Theater de Poche. May 2001. San Diego Performing Arts League. 25 Jul 2020 .
Bates, Alfred. The Drama: Its History, Literature and Influence on Civilization. 1st. London: Historical Publishing Company, 1906.
Baumann, Harriet J. . "Masks, Costumes, Ceremony Life In Seventeenth Century France." Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute. 2020. Yale University. 25 Jul 2020
Brockett, Oscar G.. History of the Theater. 9th. New York: Allyn and Bacon, 2003.
"Elizabethan Period Costumes." Ren Faire. Ren Faire. 25 Jul 2020
Goldfarb, Wilson. "Medieval Theater." Introduction to Theater. 06 SEP 2003. Northern Virginia Community College. 25 Jul 2020
Leed, Drea. "Overview of an Elizabethan Outfit." Elizabethan Costuming Page. 2005. 25 Jul 2020 .
Mulvihill , Chloe. "Roman Theater ." Roman Empire. Ireland Online. 25 Jul 2020
Robinson, Scott R.. "Origins of Theater." Scott R. Robinson Home. 2005. Central Washington University. 25 Jul 2020
San Filippo, Michael. "Commedia dell'Arte." Italian Language. 2020. About.com. 25 Jul 2020 .
"Toga party." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 22 Jul 2020, 21:46 UTC. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. 26 Jul 2020

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