13 Best Insect & Spider Field Guides

List Updated June 2022

Bestselling Insect & Spider Field Guides in 2022


National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Insects and Spiders & Related Species of North America

National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Insects and Spiders & Related Species of North America
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2022
  • Used Book in Good Condition

National Audubon Society Field Guide to Insects and Spiders: North America (National Audubon Society Field Guides)

National Audubon Society Field Guide to Insects and Spiders: North America (National Audubon Society Field Guides)
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2022
  • AUDBN FG: INSECTS & SPIDERS

A Field Guide to Insects: America North of Mexico

A Field Guide to Insects: America North of Mexico
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2022
  • Authors: Richard E. White and Donald J. Borror
  • ISBN: 0395911702

Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America (Kaufman Field Guides)

Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America (Kaufman Field Guides)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2022

Insects of the Pacific Northwest (A Timber Press Field Guide)

Insects of the Pacific Northwest (A Timber Press Field Guide)
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2022

Peterson First Guide to Insects of North America

Peterson First Guide to Insects of North America
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2022
  • FIRST GUIDE TO INSECTS OF N.A.

National Geographic Backyard Guide to Insects and Spiders of North America

National Geographic Backyard Guide to Insects and Spiders of North America
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2022
  • NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Insects: 225 Species in Full Color (A Golden Nature Guide)

Insects: 225 Species in Full Color (A Golden Nature Guide)
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2022

Beetles of Eastern North America

Beetles of Eastern North America
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2022

Backyard Bugs: An Identification Guide to Common Insects, Spiders, and More

Backyard Bugs: An Identification Guide to Common Insects, Spiders, and More
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2022
  • ADVENTURE

Insects: An Edible Field Guide

Insects: An Edible Field Guide
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2022
  • Ebury Press

A Field Guide to the Beetles of North America (Peterson Field Guide)

A Field Guide to the Beetles of North America (Peterson Field Guide)
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2022

Field Guide to the Spiders of California and the Pacific Coast States (California Natural History Guides)

Field Guide to the Spiders of California and the Pacific Coast States (California Natural History Guides)
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2022

Spider Webs and Attitudes: Leslie Marmon Silko Speaks of Pueblo Expression

Discussion of Leslie Marmon Silko's essay "Language and Literature from a Pueblo Indian Perspective" and how Pueblo story telling is unlike any other form of language form. Spiderwebs of words and how lives intersect.

Silko relates the Pueblo Creation story and explains that it allows that "far away there were other human beings, also part of this word" (288). In doing this the Pueblo's story takes in these people and, as they retell the Creation story, weave their web even more elaborately, allowing the story to grow and radiate, and come back to them.

In relating an incident with George Day, a young Pueblo, Silko tells how he drove his new Volkswagen to a bar and, forgetting to set the parking brake, allowed it to roll "back into an arroyo and [the car] was all smashed up" (290). From the telling of this story, she shows how the tale is told and retold, with others adding how they had lost "cars and family members to that arroyo" (290). And the new telling ends with admonitions that at least there been no family members in the car when it had happened. And so, George Day's tale of his beloved Volkswagen then gets wrapped up in all the other stories of the arroyo. And in this manner, spin a more intricate web pattern in its telling.

For Pueblo people, the "language is [the] story" (289). She explains why that Pueblo disdain written or spoken speeches, as they keep the "true meaning of the speaker remains hidden" (287). Therefore, the Native tribe's method of telling stories is superior, as it includes much more than other forms. Especially the written or spoken speeches. In telling the stories, the emotion and expression and all other details, including new ones, can be experienced.

As there are many tribes, there are many versions of a story. But the meaning behind the story remains because it is the expression of the story that matters. And the listener. For it is from the listener, Silko tells us, comes "a great deal of the story" (289). From her elders, Silko learns the most valuable lesson about stories. "If you can remember the stories, you will be alright" (291).

Silko then concludes her explanations by relating to the reader the tale of her aunt who speaks of going on a journey. Silko soon realizes that her aunt is talking about death, and she marvels at how the "boundless capacity of language . . . brings us together, despite great differences between cultures, despite great distances in time" (291). In this way, Silko allows the reader to have hope, that someday their experiences and stories will also loop around and grow in an intricate pattern with "many threads radiating from the center, crisscrossing each other."

Works Cited

Silko, Leslie Marmon. "Language and Literature from a Pueblo Indian Perspective." The Arlington Reader. Ed. Lynn Z. Bloom and Louise Z. Smith. 2nd ed. Boston; Bedford/St. Martin, 2020. 287-291. Print.

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