13 Best General France Travel Guides

List Updated May 2020

Bestselling General France Travel Guides in 2020


France: France Travel Guide: 101 Coolest Things to Do in France (Paris, Marseilles, Lyon, Nice, Provence, Bordeaux, Normandy, Budget Travel France)

France: France Travel Guide: 101 Coolest Things to Do in France (Paris, Marseilles, Lyon, Nice, Provence, Bordeaux, Normandy, Budget Travel France)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

Rick Steves France 2018

Rick Steves France 2018
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020

Fodor's Essential France (Full-color Travel Guide)

Fodor's Essential France (Full-color Travel Guide)
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • FODORS

Rick Steves Paris 2018

Rick Steves Paris 2018
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020

Lonely Planet France (Travel Guide)

Lonely Planet France (Travel Guide)
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • LONELY PLANET

PARIS: THE COMPLETE INSIDER´S GUIDE FOR WOMEN TRAVELING TO PARIS: Travel France Europe Guidebook (Europe France General Short Reads Travel)

PARIS: THE COMPLETE INSIDER´S GUIDE FOR WOMEN TRAVELING TO PARIS: Travel France Europe Guidebook (Europe France General Short Reads Travel)
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020

France (National Geographic Adventure Map)

France (National Geographic Adventure Map)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • Provide global travelers with the perfect tool for navigating cityscapes and more remote attractions.
  • Each title contains accurate topography, up-to-date roads, points-of-interest, and detailed
  • Adventure Maps are printed on the same durable, waterproof, and environmentally friendly material
  • Package Quantity: 1
  • Excellent Quality.

Kids' Travel Guide - France & Paris: The fun way to discover France & Paris - especially for kids (Kids' Travel Guides)

Kids' Travel Guide - France & Paris: The fun way to discover France & Paris - especially for kids (Kids' Travel Guides)
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Ireland: 2018

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Ireland: 2018
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Dordogne, Bordeaux and the Southwest Coast

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Dordogne, Bordeaux and the Southwest Coast
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • Dk Pub

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Dordogne, Bordeaux and the Southwest Coast

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Dordogne, Bordeaux and the Southwest Coast
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020
  • Dk Pub

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Paris: 2018

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Paris: 2018
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Italy

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Italy
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020

Why Do We Celebrate Gluttony?

We love our food and, more recently, we love to watch others love their food as well. Man v. Food, which debuted in 2020 on the Travel Channel, highlights entertainment that should be controversial. It's good fun, but is it wholesome?

About a year ago I was introduced to the show Man v. Food by my brother, who had seen it before on the Travel Channel. The host highlights famous local culinary delights and namesakes in cities across the country...and then chows down in various forms of eating challenges, often attempting to eat massive amounts of unhealthy food in limited time. One of the advertising taglines of the show is the fact that the host, Adam Richman, is a "regular guy" and not a competitive eater.

I don't think regular people should be encouraged to partake in the cruel gluttony of gorging on empty calories and imitating competitive eaters, especially when so much of the world is either

A.) Malnourished

or

B.) Really fat and unhealthy

For one thing, Adam Richman himself looks a little more rotund to me in his latest season of edible adventurism, which has been entitled Man v. Food Nation. It premiered on June 1, 2020, and saw Richman moving to a new role - that of gluttony coach. Instead of gorging himself, as in the previous three seasons, Richman serves as host, coach, and motivator to a local wannabe-gorger who will attempt whatever ridiculous challenge awaits. Could this be because Richman's own health and less-than-svelte figure were in considerable jeopardy after three seasons of epic gastronomic battles?

I understand the guilty pleasure, I really do, but recently the guilt has surpassed the pleasure. As my own struggles to control my figure continue in earnest (at age 26 I'm theoretically past that age-25 "peak" for male vigor) I wonder if perhaps too many of us have given up the struggle. Assisted by pro-food frenzy reality TV and the fact that you rarely hear people discuss the "deadly sin" of gluttony any longer, how many people may have decided that a growing waistline is simply okay?

While watching Man v. Food I feel like I could easily handle a second helping of dinner, dessert, or even a late-night snack. Though I certainly would not want to deprive Adam Richman and his Travel Channel cohorts of income, I don't think these shows are doing anybody much good. They are setting a bad example for people, especially young people, and glorify that which should not be glorified.

But then again, I guess there's always The Biggest Loser...


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