13 Best French Literary Criticism

List Updated July 2020

Bestselling French Literary Criticism in 2020


The Count of Monte Cristo (Penguin Classics)

The Count of Monte Cristo (Penguin Classics)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

How to Live: Or A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer

How to Live: Or A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • Other Press NY

Existentialism Is a Humanism

Existentialism Is a Humanism
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020

The Stranger

The Stranger
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • Vintage

Mythologies: The Complete Edition, in a New Translation

Mythologies: The Complete Edition, in a New Translation
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • Hill Wang

The Red Notebook

The Red Notebook
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • The Red Notebook

The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World

The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

Society Of The Spectacle

Society Of The Spectacle
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

Looking for The Stranger: Albert Camus and the Life of a Literary Classic

Looking for The Stranger: Albert Camus and the Life of a Literary Classic
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • University of Chicago Press

The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo

The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • Broadway Books

The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo

The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020
  • Broadway Books

How Proust Can Change Your Life

How Proust Can Change Your Life
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020
  • Vintage

The Way to Rainy Mountain

The Way to Rainy Mountain
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020
  • re-telling of Kiowa myths illustrated by author's father

Web Writing Literary Criticism: Why I Don't like Net Tribalism in Web Writing and Internet Marketing

I don’t care if you’re talking the Two Tribes of "Internet Marketers" and "Social Media Cool Kids" or the “Third Tribe” of the new way to market products with content on the Internet. The whole idea chaffs my sensibility.

I am all for the concept of a tight-knit community being their just outside your door, whether that door is the physical door of your home or the metaphorical door that you pass through to get online and into the digital world. I am all for one of a kind neighborhoods, I am all for unique societies, and I am all for locality. Likewise, I am all for the One-ness that communicating and connecting by way of the Internet can bring to us.

But, what is this Tribal thing? I don't care if you're talking the Two Tribes of "Internet Marketers" and "Social Media Cool Kids" or the " Third Tribe " of the new way to market products with content on the Internet. The whole idea of "tribes" and writers joining or forming them chaffs against my sensibility.

Tribes are subdivided off from the rest of the world. They're not necessarily bad but they are primitive and tend to be clannish. Sure, they are tight-knit and fierce with internal loyalty, and I understand that primitive things stir the hearts of everyone . But, whatever happened to human cultural evolution? Whatever happened to the country or nation? Whatever happened to those ideas that I say that I am all for in the first two paragraphs above?

I don't like the concept of the "Third Tribe" or what I call Net Tribalism because it smacks of an attitude that we must or are going to return to a more primitive (less evolved culturally) state of mind as a world. I know that there is a push for this both consciously among some and subconsciously among others. I love heart-stirring primitive things, I love feeling the mystic rhythms. This is one reason why I love running (always outdoors, never in a gym, and surely never on some machine). But the "Two Tribes" and the "Third Tribe" stuff reminds me much too much of the immature, divisive notions that all too often prevail in our fragmented culture today; the power struggles of those who see themselves as "victims" against those whom they label as "non-victims" and so define as The Enemy. Tribes usually have a lot of enemy tribes, and usually for sound reasons.

I understand that the Third Tribe concept is supposed to invoke imagery of Web writing and Internet marketing with Social Networks today as a grassroots orientation. But it invokes more imagery of grass-fed orienteering, to me.

I like FaceBook very fine as a social networking (but not business networking) place. And I love good online forums, and great blogs, and as I write this I am creating what's going to be an awesome Lens (if I do say so myself).

Yet, I despise the idea that when I put the writing on my Wall or I record my voice (in writing) in a forum I am sitting around some digital campfire listening to people talk about how their hunting or gathering went adventures have been going recently. Net Tribalism isn't the same as the slow blogging movement , people.

Targeted network marketing, and sometimes the free sharing of your creativity in order to create buzz and reputation (and just because it can be a good thing to do) , are awesome. Let us not go backward into the demon-haunted night with divisive Net Tribalism. I don't see or feel the need.

As a writer, I don't want a tribe. I don't even want a confederation of tribes. I want my world family. That's a larger, more inclusive readership.

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