13 Best Electrical & Electronic Circuits

List Updated April 2021

Bestselling Electrical & Electronic Circuits in 2021


Electric Circuits (8th Edition)

Electric Circuits (8th Edition)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Electric Circuits (7th Edition)

Electric Circuits (7th Edition)
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021

Lab Manual for Electronics Fundamentals and Electronic Circuits Fundamentals, Electronics Fundamentals: Circuits, Devices & Applications

Lab Manual for Electronics Fundamentals and Electronic Circuits Fundamentals, Electronics Fundamentals: Circuits, Devices & Applications
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021

Electric Circuits (10th Edition)

Electric Circuits (10th Edition)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021

Principles of Electric Circuits: Conventional Current Version (9th Edition)

Principles of Electric Circuits: Conventional Current Version (9th Edition)
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Beginner's Guide to Reading Schematics, Third Edition

Beginner's Guide to Reading Schematics, Third Edition
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021

Electronics All-in-One For Dummies (For Dummies (Computers))

Electronics All-in-One For Dummies (For Dummies (Computers))
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021
  • For Dummies

Fundamentals of Electric Circuits

Fundamentals of Electric Circuits
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021

Electronics For Dummies

Electronics For Dummies
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021
  • Wiley

Beginner's Guide to Reading Schematics, Fourth Edition

Beginner's Guide to Reading Schematics, Fourth Edition
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021

Electric Circuits (9th Edition)

Electric Circuits (9th Edition)
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2021

Principles of Electric Circuits: Electron Flow Version (9th Edition)

Principles of Electric Circuits: Electron Flow Version (9th Edition)
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2021
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Electronics Fundamentals: Circuits, Devices & Applications (8th Edition)

Electronics Fundamentals: Circuits, Devices & Applications (8th Edition)
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2021

Circuit Analysis - Basic Techniques and Principles

This guide only covers basic resistive circuits. The reader should have some basic knowledge of circuits already such as series and parallel circuits.

Basic terms to know

Current - a flow of electrons. The unit is the Ampere (A). We always say that a current goes through something.

Voltage - the difference of electric potential between two elements or nodes on a circuit. Voltage is measured in Volts (V). We say that a voltage is across something.

Node - a point on a circuit where the voltage is the same throughout. They usually connect other elements on a circuit but do not pass through said elements.

Branch - nodes often split off into branches. Each of these branches has their own respective current.

Loop - A closed circuit that could be part of a greater circuit.

Resistance - The measurement of how much an element in a circuit resists the current that is going through it. The unit is the Ohm. You can imagine what a resistor does by picturing them as light bulbs being lit up as a current goes through them.

Source - Sources are the elements on a circuit that provide a voltage or current. Therefore, the two main types of sources are voltage and current sources. There are many variations of these two main types but we won't go into details here.

Power - the measurement of work done by a current. The unit is the Watt (W). Power can be found by multiplying the Voltage by the Current (P = VI) or equivalently (I^2)*R.

Basic Principles

Ohm's Law - This is the most important law in Circuit Analysis. It is used in every analysis technique and is entirely necessary to know when even looking at a circuit. Fortunately, it is rather simple. Ohm's Law states that the Voltage is equal to the Current multiplied by the Resistance. V = IR

Kirchoff's Voltage Law (KVL) - KVL states that the voltages around a closed loop add up to zero. This forms the basic principle behind the technique known as mesh analysis.

Kirchoff's Current Law (KCL) - KCL is much like KVL, only instead of voltages, it deals with currents. KCL says that all the currents entering (or leaving) a node will add up to zero. KCL is used in nodal analysis.

Techniques

Circuit analysis techniques are almost impossible to explain using only text, so here are a few brief summaries of the main techniques.

Mesh Analysis - Usually, one uses mesh analysis when there is a circuit that involves several loops where one or more loop currents are not known. One would then use KVL to find the voltages across each of the elements on the circuit to derive an equation for the unknown loop currents.

Nodal Analysis - Nodal analysis is used when one wants to find (or already has) a node voltage. KCL would then be used to find the branch currents coming out of that node to derive an equation for the unknown element.

Superposition - The theory behind superposition is that each source on a circuit will provide a certain amount of current or voltage to an element. Thus, using superposition involves 'turning off' every source on a circuit except one and finding the effect it has on the said element. Each source will have a turn being analyzed this way, and in the end we can add up each source's effect on said element.

Thevenin and Norton Equivalence - This technique says that for each complicated circuit you can design, there is an equivalent circuit with a voltage source in series with a resistor or a current source in parallel with a resistor. This is the technique one would use when looking for the maximum power a resistor can dissipate in a specific circuit.

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