13 Best Editing Writing Reference

List Updated May 2020

Bestselling Editing Writing Reference in 2020


A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, Eighth Edition: Chicago Style for Students and Researchers (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)

A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, Eighth Edition: Chicago Style for Students and Researchers (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

The McGraw-Hill Desk Reference for Editors, Writers, and Proofreaders

The McGraw-Hill Desk Reference for Editors, Writers, and Proofreaders
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020

Writing and Editing for Digital Media

Writing and Editing for Digital Media
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020

The Craft of Research, Fourth Edition (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)

The Craft of Research, Fourth Edition (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • University of Chicago Press

Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process

Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

On Writing Well, 30th Anniversary Edition: An Informal Guide to Writing Nonfiction

On Writing Well, 30th Anniversary Edition: An Informal Guide to Writing Nonfiction
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020

Legal Writing in Plain English, Second Edition: A Text with Exercises (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)

Legal Writing in Plain English, Second Edition: A Text with Exercises (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • University of Chicago Press

The Copywriter's Handbook: A Step-By-Step Guide To Writing Copy That Sells

The Copywriter's Handbook: A Step-By-Step Guide To Writing Copy That Sells
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

Writing Science in Plain English (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)

Writing Science in Plain English (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020

Storycraft: The Complete Guide to Writing Narrative Nonfiction (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)

Storycraft: The Complete Guide to Writing Narrative Nonfiction (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

Writing Science in Plain English (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)

Writing Science in Plain English (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020

Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes, Second Edition (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)

Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes, Second Edition (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020
  • University of Chicago Press

What Editors Do: The Art, Craft, and Business of Book Editing (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)

What Editors Do: The Art, Craft, and Business of Book Editing (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020

How to Win an Essay Writing Contest

Persistence is the key to winning at anything.

Follow Contest Rules; a writing contest will specify exactly what they want. Follow the rules to a tee. The instructions will tell you what exactly is expected of you for the topic, word count, dead line, and any additional information to include in the story/article. If the Contest Rules state word count as 1200 then don't go over that amount. Try to get as close to the 1200 as possible.

Planning and Organize your time by knowing when and what to do by keeping to a disciplined scheduled time for writing. Have an idea of what you plan to write. The essay will need to have an introduction, body and conclusion. Start writing your first draft on the topic specified. You might go through 2 or 3 drafts before you get exactly what you want.

Make sure you proof read it all when you are done. If you have enough time let it sit for awhile and then come back to it and reread what you wrote. You will have a fresh mind as to being able to spot errors better. Check word count, spelling and make sure it all flows naturally. Try reading it out-loud. Does it all flow naturally to you, or are you stumbling over your words? Fix what you need to until it all fits together smoothly and don't wait for the last minute to turn in your work; when you do that, the chance that you will miss the dead line rises higher and is not good work ethics. It's like being late for work all the time. Why take the chance. You want to succeed and win so plan and organize your time and ideas.

Perseverance, Endurance, Resilience and Hard-Work is what it takes most of the time to become a winner. Look at many of the great inventors of the world and they have shown that their will power to never give up brought them success in the long run. Henry Ford failed 5 times before he achieved and Thomas Edison failed 10,000 times before he obtained an excellent outcome; thereby, achieving ultimate success. Making one mistake by not following directions will leave your story/article in the slush pile. (The garbage can!) Make way for rules, determination and the mental strength to continue on which makes for lasting winners. In addition, good writing material is of the up most importance in achieving your goal of winning. How do you get quality work written for a writing contest? Make it interesting and aw grabbing suspense; a cliff hanger that keeps you wanting to read to find out what happens next; something that happens to suck the reader into the story from the first sentence.

Focus on Your:

1.) Plot

2.) Style

3.) Characterization Structure

What is the plot of your story? Make it so interesting that the readers want to merge themselves into it. The books that I read that I don't want to end are the very best books. The ones that you get so fascinated in the story; that it captures your whole interest and you don't want to put the book down and you don't want the book to end. You just want the story to keep on going even when it is over. Do you recall books like that or even movies? Try to create your material just as striking as something that grabs at you from the very beginning. It doesn't have to be fictional writing, or any particular genre. Nonfiction can be just as striking and come together just as well it depends on the writer is all.

Make sure that you have everything in order for your writing.

You need to have the:

1.) Time

2.) Place

3.) Ideas

4.) Determination

5.) Style

6.) Theme

7.) Disciple

Consider the style of the story; that it goes with the theme and plot. You don't want a judge talking like a farmer that just lost his farm, but instead you want him to talk like a professional judge.

Focus on what your character is doing:

1.) Goals

2.) Motivation

3.) Conflict

Try to end the text at a natural stopping point. Make sure you get rid of things that don't relate to the theme when you go over your work. Always, proof read your text for errors. What kind of goals or outlook does your character(s) have? What is the motivation behind the plot? Is there some sort of conflict going on that keeps the reader focused on what's going to happen next? Cover all ends of your story and make it jump out at people, and have it end well. Don't forget to spell check when you're going to proof read. Are you ready to turn your story in to the contest?