10 Best Dental Dispensing Tips

List Updated July 2021

Bestselling Dental Dispensing Tips in 2021


(Qty 5) Easy Glide Curved Tip Syringes 10/12cc (No Needle)

(Qty 5) Easy Glide Curved Tip Syringes 10/12cc (No Needle)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021

TecUnite 8 Pack Disposable 12cc Dental Syringe with Measurement Dental Irrigation Syringe with Curved Tip, Tonsil Stone Squirt Mouthwash Cleaner

TecUnite 8 Pack Disposable 12cc Dental Syringe with Measurement Dental Irrigation Syringe with Curved Tip, Tonsil Stone Squirt Mouthwash Cleaner
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021
  • Easy to use: the plunger of this syringe fits well, easy to push down and pull up, won't detached
  • Curved tip: works well to get into small spaces, can reach places where your floss and toothbrush can't reach
  • With measurements scale: transparent body with measurement scale, you can see the capacity of liquid inside
  • Wide usage: suit to wash teeth after oral surgery, handy tool for irrigating cuts and abrasions when you are traveling, also suit for glue filling when doing craft work, or feeding medicine for your pets
  • Package includes: 8 pack in total, can use different one for different usage, or you can share some with your family members or friends who need it

AZDENT® Dental Composite Unidose Plastic Caps Applicator Dispenser Gun Grey

AZDENT® Dental Composite Unidose Plastic Caps Applicator Dispenser Gun Grey
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021

(Qty 50) Easy Glide Curved Tip Syringes 10/12cc (No Needle)

(Qty 50) Easy Glide Curved Tip Syringes 10/12cc (No Needle)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021

AGEOMET 16pcs 12cc Dental Syringe Disposable Dental Care Rinse Enema Syringe, Curved Tip

AGEOMET 16pcs 12cc Dental Syringe Disposable Dental Care Rinse Enema Syringe, Curved Tip
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021
  • Package contains: 16 dental syringes with curved tip.
  • Material: medical grade polypropylene plastic.
  • Product size: syringe capacity - 12cc/12ml, syringe length - 13cm/5.1", total length after stretching - 20cm/7.9".
  • Product Features: Front curved tip design, to ensure that the syringe can easily make maximum irrigation.
  • Product Applications: teeth washing in oral surgery, postoperative home care, molding material injection, chloride treatment, etc. Can be used for pet feeding, animal feeding and other general feeding purposes.

(Qty 25) Easy Glide Curved Tip Syringes 10/12cc (No Needle)

(Qty 25) Easy Glide Curved Tip Syringes 10/12cc (No Needle)
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021

Pre-Bent Tip for Etch Blue - 25Ga - 1000/Pk

Pre-Bent Tip for Etch Blue - 25Ga - 1000/Pk
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021
  • 10 Bags
  • 100 pcs per bag
  • Total 1000 Pre-Bent Tips

Dental Pre-bent Applicator Dispensing Tips 100/pk, Flow Tips (20 Gauge Black) pre bent

Dental Pre-bent Applicator Dispensing Tips 100/pk, Flow Tips (20 Gauge Black) pre bent
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021
  • Black
  • 100 pcs in a bag
  • Flow Tips
  • 20 Gauge

Hsan 8 Pack Dental Syringes,12CC Irrigation Syringe Oral Irrigator Syringe with Curved Tip

Hsan 8 Pack Dental Syringes,12CC Irrigation Syringe Oral Irrigator Syringe with Curved Tip
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021

Pre-Bent Tip for Flow Black - 19Ga - 100/Pk

Pre-Bent Tip for Flow Black - 19Ga - 100/Pk
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021
  • 1 Bags
  • 100 pcs per bag
  • Total 100 Pre-Bent Tips

Reinforced Learning V. Incidental Learning

Reinforced Learning theorizes that learning only happens when there is something to be gained. Incidental Learning theorizes that learning happnes simply through living. Here are some onteresting experiments comparing the two theories.

Critics of the Reinforcement Theory point out that people often tend to learn things incidentally. For example, someone visiting a new place tends to remember things about that place, like landmarks, scenery or locations, while being driven around in a taxicab. There is no apparent motivation for the person to remember these things. It seems to simply happen through the course of experience.

Supporters of the Reinforced Learning Theory counter that incidental learning is the exception and not the rule. They argue that the average person is unable to remember how many windows was in the classroom which he or she attended, the color of the instructor's eyes, or a number of other things, that if incidental learning was the rule, it would seem that they would certainly remember.

Researchers have done many experiments on the topic of Reinforced Learning versus Incidental Learning. One study in particular had a group of subjects divided into two subgroups. The first subgroup was instructed to read a list of 20 nonsense syllables (sounds that don't form any particular recognizable word) aloud to the second subgroup. The second subgroup was instructed to learn the nonsense syllables. Twenty four hours later, a "Recall" test was given. It was found that although the subjects instructed to learn the words did much better than the subjects who read the words aloud, both groups did in fact show a significant amount of learning.

Another such study was done with rats to test the Theory of Reinforced Learning against the Theory of Incidental Learning. Two groups of rats were placed at different times in a maze. The first group was put into the maze without any reward or motivation, and allowed to wander around for a few days. Later, the same group of rats was deprived food for 48 hours. The rats were then given a pre-run nibble of food at the end of the maze before being placed at the starting point. The second group of rats was simply placed in the maze without having had the prior opportunity to explore it. The results of the test showed that the rats that had the opportunity to explore the maze before the experiment had far fewer errors than the rats who had not been allowed to check out the maze beforehand.

The problem with tests like this, to determine whether learning is incidental or reinforced, is that there is no way to rule out other motivations such as curiosity, which occur outside of the control of the researcher. Even though the visitor was not offered any reward for learning things about the place he was visiting, his natural curiosity could account for the motivation in itself, and explain why he learned certain things about the place; in which case it would seem that the learning of the visitor was a combination of Reinforced Learning and Incidental learning-the satisfaction of his curiosity as being the reinforcement. The natural curiosity of the rats to explore the maze the days before the experiment could explain their Incidental Learning of the maze. The satisfaction of their natural curiosity would have been the reinforcement.

The conclusion is that neither theory, Reinforced Learning or Incidental Learning, can be disproved. Although motivated, or reinforced, learning may produce better results than incidental learning-both instances do none-the-less, produce results.

Resources:

Method and Theory in Experimental Psychology, Charlse E. Osgood, Oxford University Press, © 1968, 414-417.

A Comprehensive Dictionary of Psychological and Psychoanalytical Terms, Horace B. and Ava C. English, David McKay Company Inc., © 1958, 290.

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