10 Best Crisis Management Counseling

List Updated May 2021

Bestselling Crisis Management Counseling in 2021


Helping Teens Who Cut, Second Edition: Using DBT® Skills to End Self-Injury

Helping Teens Who Cut, Second Edition: Using DBT® Skills to End Self-Injury
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021

Crisis Communication and Crisis Management: An Ethical Approach

Crisis Communication and Crisis Management: An Ethical Approach
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021

At Risk Youth

At Risk Youth
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021

The Crisis Manual for Early Childhood Teachers: How to Handle the Really Difficult Problems

The Crisis Manual for Early Childhood Teachers: How to Handle the Really Difficult Problems
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021
  • Gryphon House

Substance Abuse: Information for School Counselors, Social Workers, Therapists, and Counselors (6th Edition)

Substance Abuse: Information for School Counselors, Social Workers, Therapists, and Counselors (6th Edition)
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021

Trauma in the Lives of Children: Crisis and Stress Management Techniques for Counselors, Teachers, and Other Professionals

Trauma in the Lives of Children: Crisis and Stress Management Techniques for Counselors, Teachers, and Other Professionals
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Crisis Management in Tourism

Crisis Management in Tourism
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Substance Abuse: Information for School Counselors, Social Workers, Therapists and Counselors (5th Edition)

Substance Abuse: Information for School Counselors, Social Workers, Therapists and Counselors (5th Edition)
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021
  • Used Book in Good Condition

A Guide to Crisis Intervention

A Guide to Crisis Intervention
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021

Counseling Strategies that Work! Evidence-based Interventions for School Counselors

Counseling Strategies that Work! Evidence-based Interventions for School Counselors
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021

Crisis Intervention for Case Managers

Sometimes unexpected visitors in a professional setting can cause chaos. Find out how to manage a crisis when the unexpected happens.

How can you as a case manager or a social service employee prepare for the unexpected? Let us say you are scheduled to meet with a client at your agency office. The client is a 15 year old female that typical comes to the appointment accompanied by her maternal grandmother who is the legal guardian. On this particular day the biological mother of the client accompanies the her to the meeting with you. The mother no longer has parental rights nor have you ever met the mother before. The teenager's mother comes into the lobby furious that she has not been made aware of the meetings with the case manager over the last 6 months. The mother has clenched fist and is yelling at the receptionist to speak with you immediately. She has informed the receptionist, if she does not speak with the case manager or supervisor within the next 5 minutes she is going to hurt someone. What do you do in this situation? What is the most appropriate manner to respond?

At first one may instantly feel fear and anxiety. There are a lot of questions, thoughts, and ideas racing through your mind. First take a deep breath to prepare for approaching the mother. It is important to understand and know that when people become anger there is a physical and verbal response that is exhibited. Although the mother has made threats there is still time to attempt to calm her in an appropriate manner. What emotions do you feel the mother is experiencing other than anger? The mother is possibly frustrated, anxious, or feels left out. Consider what it may be like to be in her shoes as a mother that no longer has parental rights of a biological child. Once you have calmed yourself as much as possible it is now time to approach the mother in the lobby.

The first thing you want to make sure you do is give the mother appropriate space. Do not stand too closely to the mother when you meet her in the lobby. Give her sufficient space to feel comfortable. She is already agitated hence standing to closely can cause more problems or a potential conflict. Meet the mother at the same level. If the mom is standing you want to make certain you are also standing. Use passive body language by ensuring your hands are not on your hips or your face is not in a scowl. In approaching the mother you want to convey understanding, empathy and compassion not confrontation.

Once you are physically in the presence of the mother, in a soft tone, introduce yourself and acknowledge her frustration. In this example, let us say that the receptionist has already informed you of the reason for the mother's reported anger. This information is a heads up for so you definitely want to capitalize on it. Acknowledge the mother's reported complaint and empathize with her feelings. Perhaps the first words to the mother will be something like the following: "Hello Ms Doe, my name is Sally. I am the case manager for your child, Anna. Is there something I can assist you with today? I noticed that you are upset."

In an ideal situation the mom will have calmed by this time but that may not be the case. In this case the mom becomes more agitated and yells at you, the case manager, for not contacting her about the service her child receives. Immediately you may want to respond and give answers but right now it is more imperative to create a safe environment. Invite the mother to have a seat with you that you may have an opportunity to empathize and valid her feelings. Empathizing with the mother can be done with the following statements: "I am wondering if you are angry because Anna comes here without your permission" or "It seems like you are very frustrated with not having custody of Anna." These are not the only statements you can make to convey empathy but it is a start. Making these types of statements will show the mother that you are not a force or cold person. Once the mother has become calm after your words of empathy a safe place is created that you may be able to answer her questions to the best of your ability. In a scenario such as this it is more important to get the person calm before problem solving occurs so that the environment continues to be safe for the client, yourself and the other customers.

In managing situations such as the above scenario you want to remember the following steps:

Crisis intervention may sound intimating and scary but it is only has horrifying as one perceives it. Make a connection with the person you are attempting to help and exercise lots of understanding and empathy by reflecting their feelings and emotions. Although it may seem passive and corny to others it helps in avoiding much confrontation and unnecessary conflict.

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