13 Best Concert Snare Drum Stands

List Updated April 2020

Bestselling Concert Snare Drum Stands in 2020


Dixon PSS-9270EX Extended Height Snare Drum Stand, Light Double-Braced

Dixon PSS-9270EX Extended Height Snare Drum Stand, Light Double-Braced
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020
  • Fully Adjustable For Drummers In The Standing Position
  • Collapses Into Two Pieces
  • Quality Parts and Metal Plating
  • Geared Tilter
  • Hinged Height Adjustment

Ahead Practice Pad Stand - Light

Ahead Practice Pad Stand - Light
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • Holds pads and drums to 14"
  • Double-Braced Legs
  • Lightweight
  • The tilt mechanism lets you adjust the angle of the drum
  • Double-braced legs for stability, and large, ergonomicasly designed adjustment nuts are easy on your fingers

Yamaha SS-662 Snare Stand - Lightweight, Single-Braced

Yamaha SS-662 Snare Stand - Lightweight, Single-Braced
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • Light weight
  • compact design
  • single-braced
  • NOTE: For 10"-12" snare drums
  • 5-year warranty

Dixon PSS-9280EX Extended Height Snare Drum Stand, Medium Double-Braced

Dixon PSS-9280EX Extended Height Snare Drum Stand, Medium Double-Braced
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • Fully Adjustable For Drummers In The Standing Position
  • Collapses Into Two Pieces
  • Quality Parts and Metal Plating
  • Geared Tilter
  • Hinged Height Adjustment

Yamaha Concert Height Snare Drum Stand

Yamaha Concert Height Snare Drum Stand
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • Excellent stability
  • Wide height adjustment range
  • Designed for use when standing, this snare drum stand offers a wide height adjustment range and excellent stability

ddrum RXSS RX Series Snare Drum Stand

ddrum RXSS RX Series Snare Drum Stand
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • Combines consistent performance, sleek design and rugged durability at an economy price
  • Features sturdy, double braced legs for stability
  • Heavy duty construction for a roadworthy piece of equipment
  • Fully adjustable to meet your needs
  • Designed to be lightweight and easy to transport

Chronos Alpha Series Concert Height Snare Stand

Chronos Alpha Series Concert Height Snare Stand
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • Concert height stand
  • Medium weight
  • Double braced
  • Holds drums 12-14" in diameter
  • Not recommended for marching snare drums

Pearl Concert Snare Drum Stand - Tall

Pearl Concert Snare Drum Stand - Tall
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020
  • Gyro Lock Tilting System
  • Double-braced legs
  • Air suspension rubber tips
  • Oversized rubber feet
  • The Pearl 1030L Snare Stand has specific features which equip it for symphonic use

MAPEX Snare Drum Stand (S600)

MAPEX Snare Drum Stand (S600)
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • The Offset Multi-Step tilter enables players to fine their ideal snare drum angle while the die-cast basket adjuster will last for years without stripping or cracking.
  • Die-Cast Snare Basket Adjuster

DW DWCP3302 Concert Snare Stand

DW DWCP3302 Concert Snare Stand
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • Drum Workshop Model#DWCP3302

Pearl SK910 Snare Drum Kit w/ Soft Bag Backpack

Pearl SK910 Snare Drum Kit w/ Soft Bag Backpack
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020
  • 14" x 5.5" Steel Shell Snare Drum, Heavy Duty basket style Snare Stand, "Gladstone" style practice pad, Nylon Backpack-Style Carrying Case, Snare Drum Sticks

Tama HS40W Stage Master Snare Stand

Tama HS40W Stage Master Snare Stand
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020
  • For 12" to 15" Diameter Snare Drums
  • 25.4mm Diameter Base Section Tubing
  • Universal Gearless Tilter
  • Swiveling Basket
  • Double Braced Legs

ChromaCast Pro Series 14-inch Snare Drum Bag (CC-PS-SD-BAG-14)

ChromaCast Pro Series 14-inch Snare Drum Bag (CC-PS-SD-BAG-14)
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020
  • Designed by legendary drummer Vinny Appice and drummers, Joey Wester and Joe Fuoco, Chromacast delivers a true drummers bag.
  • Snare Drum Bag Interior Dimensions: 17" Diameter x 7" Depth
  • Sleek black design with plush interior, 20mm padding, name tag, padded handle and removable padded shoulder strap
  • Water & weather resistant with durable zipper system
  • Extra compartment - cushioned on both walls and sealed to protect extra drum head, or use for music sheets/books & sticks

Marching Band: A Straightforward Guide to Mastering the Snare Drum

Anybody can play a rudiment. Anybody can play a drum roll. Few can play them well. Now, you can.

There are five distinct talents involved in playing the snare drum:
1) The ability to learn parts, by both reading and seeing/hearing
2) Technique--how you hold the sticks and move your wrists
3) Knowledge of parts or pieces to play
4) Endurance, or how long you can play without stopping
5) Technical proficiency, or how well you can play.

If you want to master the snare drum, you must improve in these five areas, but they will be adressed later in the article. Now, as you already know, practice is a given. By this I mean that if you don't practice then you will never amount to anything at percussion. However, it doesn't stop at practice, although many people unfortunately do. You see, mastery of any given instrument (but especially snare drum) is all about attitude, and how you practice.

Having the right attitude is step one, and probably the key step. Quite simply, you must see yourself being as good as you want to be. You have to envision your desired skill level before you attain it, and once you have that vision, you must persevere and believe that you are going to arrive at that level. It helps to have a roll model or a mentor in this case, so you have firsthand experience seeing someone who has already mastered the snare drum and thus have an easier time coming up with goals. This is possible if you know somebody in person, or if you can find enough videos of one person playing to get a comprehensive idea of how they play. Finally, you must want to be that good from the bottom of your heart. Whether it's because you just want to wax one of your drumline buddies or because you truly love the instrument, you have to have the desire to attain your goals.

Practice methods are where many drummers also fall apart. Many different things work for many different people, but I have found that consistently, the following methods yield above-average results when practicing the snare drum:

1) Playing in the dark. This allows you to just listen to yourself play and greatly facilitates improving the way you sound and your technical proficiency. It also eliminates the problem of some percussionists having to always look at their sticks when they play. Practice in the dark whenever you can; shut yourself in a room, turn off all other sounds, and go.

2) Play your rudiments to a slowly but steadily increasing tempo. This is an amazing way to become faster, sound better, and gain endurance. If you can find a metronome that slowly increases by itself, great, but you can't, just play whatever rudiment you want to work on at a certain tempo for a minute at a time and then increase that tempo by a few beats per minute and repeat. This is a great way to push your limits and build those wrist/forearm muscles. It's the reason my paradiddles sound like a roll.

3) Work on three things at a time. If you're practicing rudiments, practice three at a time. If you're going over parts of a cadence or a drum solo, go over three at a time. This way, when one gets monotonous, you can switch to another and continue practicing with the same spirit that you started with. It also helps to switch practice material every ten minutes or so, I've found, so as to avoid getting stuck in "ruts" of repetition where you don't actually get better, but just become frustrated. Just be careful not to switch too often. Give each item a chance to improve.

4) Compete with someone who is better than you. This is very simple. Find someone you know who is better than you (if not in general, then in at least one specific area). Beat them at it. Works beautifully.

5) Do a double-stroke on your softest pillow for as long as you can. This will, quite simply, make your forearms the biggest limb on your body. Expect to not have endurance problems at all after doing this for a month. I find it helpful to play for a minute maximum at a time.

Now, aside from this, it's always important to just pick up some sticks and play when you feel like it. But these techniques thrown in the mix with other assorted practice techniques of your choice will almost ensure that you constantly and greatly gain in skill level, if you have the right attitude.

As far as those five talents I listed at the beginning go, experience is probably the best teacher. Look at videos online of people playing snare and try to pick up their part. Play in front of a mirror. Whatever works for you. If you can focus your practice sessions to improving on one of those areas at a time, then you will get much better much faster than if you just. . .play.

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