13 Best Concert Bass Drum Stands

List Updated August 2020

Bestselling Concert Bass Drum Stands in 2020


Chronos Alpha Series Folding Bass Drum Stand

Chronos Alpha Series Folding Bass Drum Stand
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020
  • 1" Chrome Steel Tubing
  • Thick Felt Drum Pads

Gibraltar SC-GBDCA Bass Drum Mounted Cymbal Arm

Gibraltar SC-GBDCA Bass Drum Mounted Cymbal Arm
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • Bass drum mounted cymbal arm
  • 12" Cymbal post section with shell mount and hardware

Pearl BD015 Rubber Band for Concert Bass Drum Stand

Pearl BD015 Rubber Band for Concert Bass Drum Stand
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • Includes one (1) rubber band for suspended concert bass drum stand
  • (Pearl stands use 18 of these bands)
  • Works for all of Pearl's STBD (Suspended Concert Bass Drum Stand) series

Gibraltar 4711SC-DB Velocity Single Chain Drive Double Pedal

Gibraltar 4711SC-DB Velocity Single Chain Drive Double Pedal
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • Fast and solid chain-drive double pedal
  • New "G" style pedal board design
  • Hammer dual surface beater
  • Adjustable spring tension

DW Black Sheep Bass Drum Beater

DW Black Sheep Bass Drum Beater
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • Black-stained maple beater
  • Black wood cover
  • The black-stained maple beater offers punch and attack, and includes a black wool elastic cover that delivers a softer thump for open bass drum tunings
  • The Black Sheep beater was designed by Nashville drummer Rich Redmond to offer two sonic variations

ChromaCast CC-VS-KIT-4 Two Legged Adjustable Hi Hat Stand with Double Bass Pedal

ChromaCast CC-VS-KIT-4 Two Legged Adjustable Hi Hat Stand with Double Bass Pedal
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • Lightweight by design for easy transport
  • Contoured wing nuts and screws for easy adjustments
  • Double braced legs provide maximum support
  • Chrome Plated
  • This pack includes: Chroma Cast Double Braced Two Legged Adjustable Hi Hat Stand(CC-VS511), Chain Drive Double Pedal(CC-VS-551), & Double Braced Adjustable Throne(CC-VS-560)

Tempi Metronome for Musicians (Plastic Mahogany Grain Veneer) with 2 Year Warranty, E-Book, 2 Months Free Music Lessons

Tempi Metronome for Musicians (Plastic Mahogany Grain Veneer) with 2 Year Warranty, E-Book, 2 Months Free Music Lessons
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

Cannon UPSP Bass Drum Spur

Cannon UPSP Bass Drum Spur
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020
  • Bass Drum Spur
  • Attaches to the bass drum in a few minutes by drilling a hole in the shel
  • 7/16 drill hole required

ChromaCast Pro Series 24-inch Bass Drum Bag

ChromaCast Pro Series 24-inch Bass Drum Bag
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • Designed by legendary drummer Vinny Appice and drummers, Joey Wester and Joe Fuoco, Chromacast delivers a true drummers bag.
  • Bass Drum Bag Interior Dimensions: 27.5" Diameter x 19" Depth
  • Sleek black design with plush interior, 20mm padding, name tag, padded handle and removable padded shoulder strap
  • Water & weather resistant with durable zipper system
  • Extra compartment - cushioned on both walls and sealed to protect extra drum head, or use for music sheets/books & sticks

DW DWCP5520-2 Hi-Hat Stand

DW DWCP5520-2 Hi-Hat Stand
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • DW's patented Delta Ball-Bearing Hinge is a state-of-the-art lightweight aluminum design that incorporates ball bearings at both sides.
  • The unique Bearing Link Connector, which connects the footboard chain to the pull rod, for reduced friction and increased sensitivity.
  • Swivel Legs allow easy positioning of bass drum pedals and other stands around the Hi-Hat Stand..
  • Upper Rods come standard in two lengths (21" and 15"), allowing you to customize the Hi-Hat Stand for your specific needs.
  • The Turbo (TD3) concentric drive system maintains a direct relationship between the sprocket and the footboard to provide a solid, powerful, consistent feel and response.

Ludwig LE-790 Bass Drum Stand

Ludwig LE-790 Bass Drum Stand
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020
  • Easy to fold and store
  • Tubular metal construction
  • Rubber sleeves isolate drum for pure sound and a no-slip grip
  • For 28""36" drums

Ludwig Concert Bass Drum w/ Fiberskyn Heads & LE787 Stand Black Cortex 18x36

Ludwig Concert Bass Drum w/ Fiberskyn Heads & LE787 Stand Black Cortex 18x36
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020
  • Die-molded,cross-laminated 9-ply maple shell
  • Includes triple chromeplating, self-aligning lugs, all-wood hoops, Remo Fiberskyn drum heads and wood-stained finish
  • The all-terrain stand tilts 360o, is height adjustable and fits 28"-40" drums, with a foot rest and locking 5" casters
  • These powerful drums feature specially designed die-molded shells that are cross-laminated and constructed of nine-ply maple
  • Additional features include triple chromeplating, self-aligning lugs, all-wood hoops, smooth white Weather Master or Remo Fiberskyn drum heads and optional wood-stained finishes

DW Single-tom Bass Drum Mount

DW Single-tom Bass Drum Mount
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020
  • Drum Workshop Model#DWCP9991BD

Four Ways to Mic a Snare Drum

If your recordings are sounding unprofessional, the tone and sound of the snare drum is a good place to start looking for the reason.

A snare is the backbone of your song's rhythm section, and you need to be able to get the tone you want out of it. Whether you're looking for a bright, clean snare, or a more ragged, rough sound, anything is possible with a good microphone and a little bit of time for experimentation. Here are a few ways to record a snare drum that get pretty radically different sounds.

1. From the top - You can get a sort of spread out sound by miking the snare from the top. Place an SM57 or a microphone designed specifically for drums about 2-3 inches above the top head of the snare, taking care to avoid placing the microphone in a spot where the drummer might accidentally hit it with his stick while playing. You'll want it very slightly angled against the surface of the snare drum.

2. From the bottom - You can also mic the snare from the bottom of the drum, which will often provide better isolation and a more punchy sound. To do this, follow the same basic procedure as miking the drum from the top, only experiment a bit with the distance between the microphone and the drum head (since you're miking from the bottom, you obviously don't have to worry about the drumsticks hitting the microphone). Depending on how your snare is tuned and the type of snare, you may prefer to mic very closely.

3. With an overhead - For many live applications and any situation where you want to get an open, loose sound, you might consider just using overhead microphones to record your snare drum. The most common way to put up overheads is using two microphones equidistant from each other a few feet above the drums (preferably a matched pair of microphones, if you have them). You can also use a single microphone, although drums sound better when they're panned in stereo.

A quick word on mixing; you'll want to avoid EQ boosts as much as you can, and compress the snare proportionally to how regulated you want the snare sound to be. Most modern recordings use a fairly severe compression ration on the snare drum. Also, be sure to take into account any bleed of the snare drum into the other microphones you have set up; if you're using overheads, for instance, you'll want to mix with all of the recorded tracks simultaneously playing, as this is the only way that you'll get a real sense of how the snare drum sounds.

Do you have experience miking a snare drum? Post your tips in the comments section below.

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