12 Best Civil Rights Law

List Updated June 2020

Bestselling Civil Rights Law in 2020


Understanding Civil Rights Litigation

Understanding Civil Rights Litigation
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

From Jim Crow to Civil Rights: The Supreme Court and the Struggle for Racial Equality

From Jim Crow to Civil Rights: The Supreme Court and the Struggle for Racial Equality
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020

Making Civil Rights Law: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court, 1936-1961

Making Civil Rights Law: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court, 1936-1961
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020

Civil Rights Law and Practice (Hornbook)

Civil Rights Law and Practice (Hornbook)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020

Constance Baker Motley: One Woman's Fight for Civil Rights and Equal Justice under Law

Constance Baker Motley: One Woman's Fight for Civil Rights and Equal Justice under Law
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

Sweet Land of Liberty: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North

Sweet Land of Liberty: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

The New Jim Crow:  Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • Product Details Paperback: 336 pages Publisher: The New Press (January 16, 2012) Language: English ISBN-10: 1595586431 ISBN-13: 9781595586438 Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Once in a great while a book comes along that changes the way we see the world and helps to fuel a nationwide social movement. The New Jim Crow is such a book. Praised by Harvard Law professor Lani Guinier as "brave and bold," this book directly challenges the notion that the election of Barack Obama signals a new era of colorblindness.
  • With dazzling candor, legal scholar Michelle Alexander argues that "we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it."
  • By targeting black men through the War on Drugs and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control-relegating millions to a permanent second-class status-even as it formally adheres to the principle of colorblindness. In the words of Benjamin Todd Jealous, president and CEO of the NAACP, this book is a "call to action."

Constitutional Law for a Changing America: Rights, Liberties, and Justice (Ninth Edition)

Constitutional Law for a Changing America: Rights, Liberties, and Justice (Ninth Edition)
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

Concentrate Questions and Answers Human Rights and Civil Liberties: Law Q&A Revision and Study Guide (Concentrate Law Questions & Answers)

Concentrate Questions and Answers Human Rights and Civil Liberties: Law Q&A Revision and Study Guide (Concentrate Law Questions & Answers)
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020

Civil Rights and the Making of the Modern American State

Civil Rights and the Making of the Modern American State
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

Constitutional Law and Politics: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (Ninth Edition) (Vol. 2)

Constitutional Law and Politics: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (Ninth Edition)  (Vol. 2)
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020

Working Law: Courts, Corporations, and Symbolic Civil Rights (Chicago Series in Law and Society)

Working Law: Courts, Corporations, and Symbolic Civil Rights (Chicago Series in Law and Society)
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020

Ivory Perry was Instrumental in Passing Lead Regulation Laws in St. Louis

It use to be that all of the old brick houses in St. Louis had lead paint in them. This caused health problems for the children that lived in them. Ivory Perry was a civil rights activist who took action.

We used bug spray by the ton in the summertime. My mom would spray the foul-smelling stuff onto the screens in the kitchen and when the breeze blew in, the fumes came right in with it.

Both my parents smoked when the dangers of second hand smoke weren't known. When they took me to school in the morning, the car would be so filled with smoke that I could hardly breathe.

My parents always told me to eat all the food on my plate. I guess that they didn't realize that I could become fat and obese when I got older and die from it.

And we lived in a very old, creaky house. The house had a lot of windows and all of them had those old lead window weights as well as lead paint around the trim. A nice double helping of lead exposure.

Lead exposure in children can cause brain damage in children and high blood pressure in adults. And since there were a lot of old brick building in St. Louis at the time, the problem was a widespread one. Add to that the fact that cars were burning fuel with lead in it and it's a wonder that we survived at all.

According to The Healthy Planet Magazine, Ivory Perry was a civil rights activists who alerted St. Louis to the dangers of lead poisoning. The segregation and racism that Ivory experienced as a teenager in Arkansas meant that he was not surprised to serve in a segregated unit when he joined the army in 1948.

Ivory came to St. Louis in 1954 and was drawn into civil rights protests within a few years. When the extensive picketing for jobs at Jefferson Bank began in 1963, he was often in the press when arrested for actions such as lying in front of cars.

Ivory also worked with renter who were being discriminated against by their landlords. While working wit these renters, he discovered a lot of health problems with the children in the homes. He found out that this could be tied to the lead paint in the children's homes.

Ivory Perry was instrumental in persuading the city of St. Louis to pass its first laws concerning the regulation of lead paint in the homes.

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