13 Best Christian Pastoral Counseling

List Updated May 2021

Bestselling Christian Pastoral Counseling in 2021


Strategic Pastoral Counseling: A Short-Term Structured Model

Strategic Pastoral Counseling: A Short-Term Structured Model
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Counseling: How To Counsel Biblically

Counseling: How To Counsel Biblically
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021
  • Nelson Reference Electronic Publishing

Christian Counseling: A Comprehensive Guide

Christian Counseling: A Comprehensive Guide
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021
  • Nelson Reference Electronic Publishing

Christian Counseling Ethics: A Handbook for Psychologists, Therapists and Pastors (Christian Association for Psychological Studies Books)

Christian Counseling Ethics: A Handbook for Psychologists, Therapists and Pastors (Christian Association for Psychological Studies Books)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021
  • IVP Academic

Psychology, Theology, and Spirituality in Christian Counseling (Aacc Counseling Library)

Psychology, Theology, and Spirituality in Christian Counseling (Aacc Counseling Library)
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021

Caring for God's People (Integrating Spirituality Into Pastoral Counseling)

Caring for God's People (Integrating Spirituality Into Pastoral Counseling)
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Soren Kierkegaard's Christian Psychology: Insight for Counseling & Pastoral Care

Soren Kierkegaard's Christian Psychology: Insight for Counseling & Pastoral Care
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021

Solution-Focused Pastoral Counseling: An Effective Short-Term Approach for Getting People Back on Track

Solution-Focused Pastoral Counseling: An Effective Short-Term Approach for Getting People Back on Track
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021

ACT for Clergy and Pastoral Counselors: Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Bridge Psychological and Spiritual Care

ACT for Clergy and Pastoral Counselors: Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Bridge Psychological and Spiritual Care
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021

Christian Therapist's Notebook: Homework, Handouts, and Activities for Use in Christian Counseling

Christian Therapist's Notebook: Homework, Handouts, and Activities for Use in Christian Counseling
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021

Sin and Grace in Christian Counseling: An Integrative Paradigm (Christian Association for Psychological Studies Books)

Sin and Grace in Christian Counseling: An Integrative Paradigm (Christian Association for Psychological Studies Books)
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2021

Christian Counseling: A Comprehensive Guide

Christian Counseling:  A Comprehensive Guide
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2021
  • Used Book in Good Condition

A Theology of Christian Counseling: More Than Redemption (Jay Adams Library)

A Theology of Christian Counseling: More Than Redemption (Jay Adams Library)
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2021

How to Lead a Crisis Team

When I signed up to for be on my church pastoral care team, I didn't know I'd be on call to help out in a crisis so soon.

This week a dear elderly couple suddenly needed immediate care as both of them were in and out of the hospital and I was in charge of their situation. At first, I felt overwhelmed, not knowing what to do. However, it wasn't long before I actually felt confident and stopped thinking, "I'm not good at this. What am I gonna do?" After talking with a woman gifted in coordinating help during a crisis, I was ready to jump in and lead my crisis team with the appropriate care that the elderly couple needed.

Do you panic when there's a crisis? If so, you're not alone. Most people feel helpless when it comes to offering immediate support when someone close to them is going through a crisis or sudden tragedy.

The first thing to do is stop and takes a deep breath. Say a prayer and realize that you can't do everything, but you can do something. Instead of feeling paralyzed, wondering, "what can I possibly do to help?" sit down and analyze what you can do, what you do know, and don't know the situation. Then, pick up the phone and call the person who needs help.

Talking to the person in need is the first step before getting on the phone and asking everyone in your church or neighborhood to bring over a casserole. As you're the mediator between the hurting and the helping, your most important role is to first get information.

If you just blindly make calls or send out emails asking everyone to bring over food, they'll be more food that the people can store in their refrigerator. At first, that's what I did. Then, I realized it was necessary to access the situation. After calling both the husband (who was on crutches) and his wife who'd been rushed to the hospital as she was weak from an earlier operation, I knew more about the situation. Then, I not only made a few meals myself, but also asked about 4-5 other people on my team to bring over meals. I also discovered that the elderly couple had some family members nearby, so that helped.

At first, it could be that the person in a crisis just wants a listening ear and a warm shoulder on which they can cry. Then, after you've given him (or her) a chance to express their pain, simply ask, "What can I do?" Usually if the person in a crisis says, "nothing," realize that there is usually something you can do. If they say "nothing," ask for specifics such as , "Can we bring over meals? Provide transportation? Clean your house?"

What about dealing with someone who's grieving? When people experience loss through death, it's important that you don't tell them how they should feel. We may know just the right Biblical passage to share with them, but don't jump in with scriptures just yet. Realize that they must first go through the initial stage of grief. In other words, they're in shock. Instead of quoting scripture or telling them they're loved one is out of their pain, encourage them to talk---to express their true feelings of anger, shock, loss, or denial. Those who've lost loved ones need to express their emotions, especially in the early stages of fresh grief. After they've let out their tears and expressed their pain, there'll be a time to reassure them of God's promises of eternal life.

In addition, when comforting parents who've lost a child, don't forget to minister to siblings and other family members such as aunts, uncles, grandparents, etc. Realize that the brothers and sisters of a child who dies are undergoing just as much pain as their parents.

Finally, remember that you get better at helping out in a crisis the more you do it. As with everything else you do, practice makes perfect. Even if you make a few blunders, it's better than sitting back and doing nothing at all.

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