13 Best Business Writing Skills

List Updated June 2020

Bestselling Business Writing Skills in 2020


HBR Guide to Better Business Writing (HBR Guide Series)

HBR Guide to Better Business Writing (HBR Guide Series)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

Writing That Works; How to Communicate Effectively In Business

Writing That Works; How to Communicate Effectively In Business
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • Collins Reference

10 Steps to Successful Business Writing, 2nd Edition

10 Steps to Successful Business Writing, 2nd Edition
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020

Strategic Business Letters and E-mail

Strategic Business Letters and E-mail
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • Contains a simple, six-step process for creating messages that get and hold the recipients attention.
  • Chapters include Sales and Marketing with Pizzazz, Successful Job Search and Employment Issues, Customer Relations and Personal Business.
  • Specific chapters on such areas as sales and marketing, customer relations, and personal business offer hundreds of sample letters, memos, and e-mail messages.
  • Also includes numerous tips and reminders that help make the central point that a successful message should always focus on what the primary reader needs to know.
  • 6W x 9H Inches

Business Writing: What Works, What Won't

Business Writing: What Works, What Won't
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

Business Writing: What Works, What Won't

Business Writing: What Works, What Won't
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • GRIFFIN

Business Writing With Heart: How to Build Great Work Relationships One Message at a TIme

Business Writing With Heart: How to Build Great Work Relationships One Message at a TIme
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

Handbook For Writing Proposals, Second Edition

Handbook For Writing Proposals, Second Edition
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

The AMA Handbook of Business Writing: The Ultimate Guide to Style, Grammar, Punctuation, Usage, Construction, and Formatting

The AMA Handbook of Business Writing: The Ultimate Guide to Style, Grammar, Punctuation, Usage, Construction, and Formatting
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020

Business Writing Essentials: How To Write Letters, Reports and Emails

Business Writing Essentials: How To Write Letters, Reports and Emails
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

Financial Intelligence, Revised Edition: A Manager's Guide to Knowing What the Numbers Really Mean

Financial Intelligence, Revised Edition: A Manager's Guide to Knowing What the Numbers Really Mean
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020

Business Writing For Dummies

Business Writing For Dummies
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020

The Truth About the New Rules of Business Writing

The Truth About the New Rules of Business Writing
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020

Free and Easy EFL/ESL Lesson Plan: Making Good Business Decisions - Excellent for Business English Students

EFL/ESL business English students struggle with making good business decisions, this free lesson plan will show them how.

Expected Learning Outcome - EFL/ESL students will understand what they need to think about to make a good business decision.

Materials and Resources - Whiteboard markers, whiteboard, a handout with types of stores listed

Time Frame - 1 hour to 1 hour 30 minutes

Teaching Procedures

Step One- Put your students into groups and ask the groups to spend 5 minutes writing a list of the top retailers (shops) in their country. (5 mins)

Step Two - Now ask the groups to write down why they think each retailer is so successful. What do they do other retailers don't do? What locations are their stores in that help them? What products do they sell that make them so popular? Is the quality of their product good? etc (5 mins)

Step Three - Ask each group to name 2-3 top retailers and write these retailers on the board. Next to each name, write a couple of reasons why the groups think these retailers are so successful. Once the list is on the board, spend 5 minutes discussing with the class if they think these retailers have made good business decisions and what they think are the best business decisions. (10 mins)

Step Four - With students remaining in the same groups, give the groups this assignment:

"You are opening a small shopping mall near a suburban train station. You have room for 6 stores but 12 stores have applied. Which stores will you accept and why? Where will you locate each store in the mall?" (I also draw a small map on the board of a shopping mall with 6 available store slots dotted around the mall, with each group having to decide where on the map they will put the shops).

Then give each group a handout that says - 1) coffee shop, 2) camera shop, 3) toy shop, 4) designer jeans shop, 5) luggage shop, 6) book shop, 7) burger restaurant, 8) cell phone shop, 9) pizza restaurant 10) jewelry shop, 11) women's fashion shop, and 12) men's fashion shop.

Give the groups 20 minutes to decide which of the 12 stores they will accept and why, as well as where on the mall map they would locate them. Tell them they need to think about the location (it's near a train station), what types of people are likely to shop there, what kinds of items will they be looking for, what types of items are likely to be successful? etc. (20 minutes)

Step Five - Once the 20 minutes is over, have each group tell you which 6 stores they chose and why. Write these on the board. Then compare between groups and see which stores everyone chose and which stores no-one chose.

Have a class discussion on a) did they choose the correct stores for prime success in that location? b) did they think of all the relevant (common sense) factors to make these stores successful? c) was there anything they didn't consider they should have considered? 4) did they put the stores in the best locations in the mall etc.

(During these class discussions it's actually interesting to see how often many EFL/ESL students don't think about location (what's likely to be successful near a train station - coffee, food, books, toys for dad to take home to kids etc.) and what's not likely to be successful (jewelry stores (too expensive for quick decisions), luggage stores (people traveling are likely to already have luggage) etc.) (15-30 minutes, depending on class length)

Step Six - Wrap-up. Talk quickly about "making good business decisions". How location of a business is very important, how what products the business sells and prices the business charges are key, what type of customers are likely to be in that location, how other businesses around can affect success etc. etc. At the end of this quick lesson plan, you're certainly not going to have students who immediately make perfect business decisions, but it at least puts the idea into their heads about types of things they should consider when trying to make good business decisions. (5-15 minutes, depending on class length)

Evaluation/Assessment: 1. Good understanding of the material discussed, 2. Each student's ability to participate in the discussion and to use appropriate grammar and vocabulary in that particular business situation, 3. Ability to work in groups, to participate fully in the group, and to help other group members who may be having difficulty with the assignment.

I've used this lesson plan in many Business English classes and had great success in all of them. Students overall, even older adult students, love to shop so talking about which shops are good and which are not is often fun for them. It's also a good starting-off point for similar 'good decision' classes later.

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