10 Best Bass Guitar Parts

List Updated August 2020

Bestselling Bass Guitar Parts in 2020


YMC 1 Set Electric Guitar Neck Plate with Screws for Strat Tele Guitar Precision,Jazz Bass Replacement, Black

YMC 1 Set Electric Guitar Neck Plate with Screws for Strat Tele Guitar Precision,Jazz Bass Replacement, Black
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

PIXNOR 4R Bass Tuners Machine Heads Tuning Pegs (Silver)

PIXNOR 4R Bass Tuners Machine Heads Tuning Pegs (Silver)
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • Color: mainly silver. Material: durable hard zinc alloy.
  • Includes 4pcs right bass tuners.
  • Those bass tuning pegs is great for bass tuning.
  • A great replacement for the old, broken tuning pegs.
  • Essential accessory of a bass, perfect for you!

2pcs Guitar Strap Locks Metal Strap Buttons Metal End Pins Flat Head for Acoustic Classical Electric Guitar Bass Ukulele, Black(Pack of 2)

2pcs Guitar Strap Locks Metal Strap Buttons Metal End Pins Flat Head for Acoustic Classical Electric Guitar Bass Ukulele, Black(Pack of 2)
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • 1 x PAIR Guitar Strap Pins Tail Nail Lock Button Pegs Screw Flat Head Black
  • Locking strap buttons for acoustic guitar, classical guitar, electric guitar, bass or ukulele and all standard straps, it is a small metal made end pin with rubber washer.
  • Easy to install, convenient to use, set of two
  • 100% brand new and high quality
  • Package Including:2 x strap buttons;2x cushions;2 x screws

Timiy Electric Guitar Part Neck Plate with Screws Chrome for Strat Tele Guitar Precision,Jazz Bass Replacement 2 Sets (Silver Tone)

Timiy Electric Guitar Part Neck Plate with Screws Chrome for Strat Tele Guitar Precision,Jazz Bass Replacement 2 Sets (Silver Tone)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020

Jazz Bass Electric Bass Guitar Part Replacement Pickup Steel Protector Cover Plated Chrome

Jazz Bass Electric Bass Guitar Part Replacement Pickup Steel Protector Cover Plated Chrome
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

Snark SN5X Clip-On Tuner for Guitar, Bass & Violin (Current Model)

Snark SN5X Clip-On Tuner for Guitar, Bass & Violin (Current Model)
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020

Musiclily 3mm Electric Guitar Bass Pickguard Screws Pick Guards Scratch Plate Mounting Screws for Fender Strat ST Tele TL Stratocaster Telecaster Gibson LP Les Paul SG Guitar, Black (Pack of 50)

Musiclily 3mm Electric Guitar Bass Pickguard Screws Pick Guards Scratch Plate Mounting Screws for Fender Strat ST Tele TL Stratocaster Telecaster Gibson LP Les Paul SG Guitar, Black (Pack of 50)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

Kmise Bass Guitar Bridge (A4020)

Kmise Bass Guitar Bridge (A4020)
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020
  • Style: Fender Vintage 4 Strings J-Bass Style
  • Fits the bass that has a 5-bolt setu
  • E to E Center Width(String Spread): 57.0mm (2.25 inches)

Pixnor String Action Ruler Gauge Tool for Guitar Bass

Pixnor String Action Ruler Gauge Tool for Guitar Bass
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • Material: Stainless Steel. Ruler size: 8.9 * 5.1cm 3.5 * 2in (length * width).
  • Application: electric guitar, bass and acoustic guitar. Unit: mm in.
  • Scale for string height: 0.01-0.14in 0.25-3.50mm.
  • Scale for bridge saddle slot depth: 0-0.875in 0-20mm.
  • Scale for nuts saddles and polepieces: 0-0.75in 0-20mm.

Usany 2+2 Bass Vintage Open Gear Tuner Tuning Keys Pegs Machine Head Right Hand for Jazz P Bass Guitar Parts, Gold

Usany 2+2 Bass Vintage Open Gear Tuner Tuning Keys Pegs Machine Head Right Hand for Jazz P Bass Guitar Parts, Gold
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • Alloy metal made,plating finish; Color: Gold
  • For Economy Precision Bass or Jazz Bass Tuning Key.The bushing inner diameter 14.20MM, outside diameter 18.25MM, peg diameter is 13.85MM, peg length is 30.5 MM.
  • Nut,Ferrule,Screws are included.
  • Open gear style, you can assemble it so that custom your own side.
  • Package Include: 4 x Bass Tuning Pegs; 4 x ferrules; 4 x screws(2R+2L)

Interview: Kasim Sulton Talks About Hitting the Road

Interview with musician Kasim Sulton. Tours with Todd Rundgren, was a member of Todd Rundgren & Utopia and is the bass player and musical director for Meat Loaf

This night I was fortunate enough to meet and talk to the man himself on Meat Loaf's current sold out "Three Bats Tour," when they made their stop on an extremely hot and humid August night in South Florida.

TM: First of all, thank you Kasim for taking the time to do this interview. Great Meat Loaf show tonight. How hot was it up on that stage?

KS: Pretty warm. I don't know how Floridians make it through the summer months. Of course, it's not a bad thing to play a show where you wind up sweating away a third of your body weight. I find it a lot more fun than visiting a gym.

TM: I've seen Meat about a dozen times live. It's always an incredible show. Being the musical director, who decides on the song list for the tour? There were a couple of interesting choices in tonight's show. Obviously you can't play everything or the show would be 5 hours long, but I have to tell you, leaving the show I did overhear many audience goers wondering why "Two Out Of Three Ain't Bad," wasn't in the show.

KS: Meat Loaf always has the first and last word on what songs are going to be performed on any tour. The band can make suggestions but Meat will have a pretty good idea on what songs he wants to do well before we even start rehearsals.

There are certain songs that will always be mainstays ... 'Paradise', 'Bat Out Of Hell', 'Anything For Love'. The only reason why we didn't do 'Two Out Of Three' was because we had just finished a European tour where were it was in the set and Meat wanted to mix it up a bit.

TM: Was there one defining moment when you were a kid that you decided you wanted to be a musician?

KS: February 9th, 1964. The Beatles performed on the Ed Sullivan show that night and that cinched it for me.

TM: Going back through your incredible musical history, how did you first meet Todd Rundgren and become a member of Utopia?

KS: John Seigler was playing Bass with Utopia up until March of 1976. He left to persue a career in the advertising industry. That left a void that needed to be filled. Todd put the word out on the street that he needed a Bassist and I was fortunate enough to hear about it and know someone who recommended me to Roger Powell who was responsible for scheduling auditions. I went to the audition a few days later with the thought in mind that I probably wouldn't get it but it would be a good thing for me to do.

Obviously, the stars lined up for me that day and I was lucky enough to land the gig.

I still consider that the best day of my life in terms of where I've been and what I've done in my career.

TM: When you're writing does the music or lyrics come first?

KS: More often than not, I'm inspired by some music first, then I try and figure out what I'd like to say.

TM: What era was the best to be a touring musician in?

KS: When I first started touring in the late '70's there was a lot more excitement involved. It was a lot less 'business like'. We weren't worried about payroll, Merch sales, spread sheets or ticket sales. We just did what we did and people came to see us. These days, it's so much more corporate. It's so very expensive to tour that if you're not selling tickets in decent numbers, it doesn't make a whole lot of sense to do it. I do miss the fans sleeping outside my hotel room door though.

TM: Do you feel more at home on stage or in the studio?

KS: I would love to spend the majority of time in a recording studio. I've always felt more comfortable being able to perfect any given piece of music. The problem is, being a performer as well as a recording artist means there will come a time when I want to take what I've created in the studio and play it front of an audience. So, it's a double edged sword. If I had to pick one over the other I'd have to say I'd rather be ensconced in a windowless room with a bunch of recording gear for the foreseeable future.

TM: As a writer is it easier to write about your own personal experience in a song or project yourself into a situation?

KS: I don't consider myself a very good storyteller... making up situations that I haven't personally experienced. I like to draw inspiration from my own day too day encounters. Usually, if something affects me strong enough, either positively or negatively, I'll find myself with some grist for the song mill.

TM: Is there anything you won't write about?

KS: I doubt I'd ever write about Space Travel. However, I wouldn't rule it out completely.

TM: I really enjoyed listening to your CD "Quid Pro Quo." I really like the acoustic sound. The song "Heaven Help The Child," really stood out for me. How did that song come about?

KS: As simple as me walking into my daughter's room one day and taking stock of the things I saw... A rainbow that she had drawn in class, the dolls beside the bed... all the things one might find in a child's room. That song more or less wrote itself once the idea came.

TM: What do you want fans to take with them when it comes to your music?

KS: I guess every artist wants the same things most people want... to be loved, respected, admired, understood ... I'd like for people to get a certain amount of joy when listening to my music. To have it evoke some memory ... to have it touch an emotion. To relate to what I'm saying and think; "I've felt that too, I know what he's talking about."

TM: I've played guitar for many years, and not very well I must add. I haven't picked it back up in about 15 years. I played bass for a short time. I know you have a signature bass. Can you tell me something about it and what makes it different from other bass guitars?

KS: When I was approached by the folks at Interstate Music in Wisconsin regarding having a signature guitar I jumped at the chance. My only criteria, other than complete control over the design was that it be good enough for someone like me to take on the road and yet affordable enough so that a younger player could buy one without going into hock.

Along with the team at Interstate, we came up with a guitar that's both affordable and road worthy. I also use the Bass on records I've done since 2005.

TM: I've noticed a change in the way record labels deal with their artists in regards to promotion and all the stuff that goes along with their music. As an insider, have you felt a shift and if so does that change your relationship and how you deal with the label?

KS: The Industry has changed so much over the past 20 years. There used to be a certain amount of concern over the longevity of an act. Don't overexpose, don't go for a quick buck ... so what if there aren't 4 'singles' on your record ... These days, record sales keep declining. One might argue there is a lack of good music being made or that it's just too easy to get it free by file trading. I have a 17 year old daughter and I can't tell you the last time she bought a CD yet, she's constantly listening to new music, new artists.

There is a lot of really good new stuff out there and there will continue to be as long as people are making music.

I don't have to deal with record labels much at all these days. There are so many other viable ways to get my music out there that it doesn't pay for me to sign any kind of contract that nets me 11 cents on a dollar.

TM: The reason I mentioned the record companies is this: I saw very little promotion for Meat's "Bat Out Of Hell 3," CD, and nothing for the "Three Bats Tour." I certainly didn't see anything for his previous release, "Couldn't Have Said It Better." So as a major artist does that have an effect on the psyche as you tour and do interviews?

KS: I'm not sure that there wasn't much promotion on the two CD's you mentioned. I can tell you that historically Meat Loaf does a lot better overseas than he does in the USA. It could be that the areas that the label chose to promote in might have slipped under your radar. I know there were ad's on VH1 and in print but why you didn't see any is hard for me to say. The disparity in the US vs. the UK and Europe is evident in concert attendance. Meat Loaf can sell 15,000 seats night after night overseas but in the US, we play much smaller venues.

TM: You've worked with some incredible performers and producers in the music business. What are the definable differences between Todd Rundgren, Jim Steimman and Desmond Child? Strengths and weakness, if there are any, of each?

KS: Each of the people you mentioned are artists in their own right with individual strengths and weaknesses. It would be like asking me what's the difference between an Apple and an Orange and how do they taste alike? Having said that I can say that only one of them is an amazing singer AND songwriter. Jim and Desmond are Songwriters first and Producers second ... Todd is both AND a Performer as well.

TM: What goes through your mind when you're up on stage playing in front of 15,000 to 20,000 people?

KS: Have I made my Mortgage payment this month?

TM: In a very early interview with Joan Jett back in the 1980's she joked she didn't really know what her fans wanted in regards to groupies. Which I found rather funny. Is there a difference touring with a woman at the forefront rather than a man?

KS: The Women artists tend to have more Male fans at the front of the stage. Not a lot of fun for me in that regard.

TM: Without dropping any names, unless of course you'd like to get some things off your chest, any really rough tours with headliners that you'd rather not tour with again?

KS: HA! My Mother told me if I didn't have anything good to say, I shouldn't say anything at all.

TM: You're about to embark on the European leg of Meat's tour. How long will you be on the road and how do American audience differ from European audiences?

KS: I leave for the UK on October 16th and we'll be touring there and in Europe until November 26th.

The only difference in audiences is size. We play much larger venues overseas. Other than that, the fans are always the best.

TM: I know you're going to be doing some dates with Rundgren soon. Will it be a short tour around the country or just some dates in the L.A. area?

KS: I'm actually answering these questions while I'm on the road with Todd. It's really just a short two and a half week tour up and down the West Coast.

TM: What is the craziest thing that's happened on tour?

KS: Could be the time I was playing a sold out show with Meat Loaf at Wembley Arena in the UK. We were about halfway through the show when I looked over at Meat and he was as white as a sheet. A few seconds later he went down like a sack of potatoes. I rushed over to see what was wrong and I couldn't get him to respond to me. This was between songs in front of 11 thousand people! There was dead silence in the whole place and I screamed over to the keyboardist to play something, ANYTHING! Meat finally opened his eyes and I told him he shouldn't go on but he insisted on doing the next song. He made it through about half of the song before he stopped the band and told the audience he couldn't continue the show. He wound up in the hospital for the next two weeks having surgery to repair a damaged nerve on his heart.

TM: Can you offer any advice for kids today looking to get into the music business?

KS: First and foremost, FINISH SCHOOL! Don't think that because you can play guitar or write a song that you're going to be able to have a career in the music business. It takes a tremendous amount of talent, perseverance and luck to be able to do this full time.

Having said that, I think it's important to listen to your heart and do everything you can to realize a dream.

TM: Whom does the bobble head in the Speedos represent to in the Loaf band and where was Meat's bobble?

KS: The Bobble Head in question would be John Miceli our drummer. He's our resident class clown. Why there isn't a Meat Loaf bobble head doll is a very good question. I'll do some investigating and get back to you on it.

TM: Since I've never been to New York what are the absolute 'must sees' and where can I get the best Italian food?

KS: Absolute must see's in NYC? Empire State Building, Central Park, Chinatown, West amp; East Village, Brooklyn Bridge, Little Italy, Soho, Tribeca, Times Square, Circle Line tour around the Island and of course, Ground Zero. The best Italian food is most likely being cooked in a small kitchen somewhere in Brooklyn by an older Woman who's last name ends in a vowel, with knee stockings and a little mustache hair on her upper lip.

Related Bestselling Lists That You Might Like