10 Best Automotive Replacement Control Arm Shaft Kits

List Updated July 2020

Bestselling Automotive Replacement Control Arm Shaft Kits in 2020


ACDelco 45J0016 Professional Front Lower Suspension Control Arm Shaft Kit with Hardware

ACDelco 45J0016 Professional Front Lower Suspension Control Arm Shaft Kit with Hardware
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020
  • High-quality replacement for your worn original equipment
  • Provide ease of installation for customer convenience
  • Complete assembly to reduce installation time
  • Light-weight construction to meet application requirements

Auto Extra Mevotech MK6147 Control Arm Shaft Kit

Auto Extra Mevotech MK6147 Control Arm Shaft Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • Mevotech MK6147 USE WC1-10191
  • Quantity Pack is 1 Each.

ACDelco 45J0008 Professional Front Lower Suspension Control Arm Shaft Kit with Hardware

ACDelco 45J0008 Professional Front Lower Suspension Control Arm Shaft Kit with Hardware
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • High-quality replacement for your worn original equipment
  • Provide ease of installation for customer convenience
  • Complete assembly to reduce installation time
  • Light-weight construction to meet application requirements

MAS CSK6098 Control Arm Shaft Kit (1969-72 CHEVROLET BLAZER FUP 1963-72 CHEVROLET C10 PICKUP FUP 1968-72 CHEVROLET C10 SUBURBAN FUP 1971-72 CHEVROLET G10 VAN FUP 1971 CHEVROLET G20 VAN FUP 1963-67 CHEVROLET P10 S)

MAS CSK6098 Control Arm Shaft Kit (1969-72 CHEVROLET BLAZER FUP 1963-72 CHEVROLET C10 PICKUP FUP 1968-72 CHEVROLET C10 SUBURBAN FUP 1971-72 CHEVROLET G10 VAN FUP 1971 CHEVROLET G20 VAN FUP 1963-67 CHEVROLET P10 S)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020

Moog K6104 Control Arm Shaft Kit

Moog K6104 Control Arm Shaft Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • Allows additional positive camber adjustment.
  • Use on 1963 - 1982 Chevy vehicles
  • Designed as stock replacement
  • Easy to install

Parts Master K6147 Control Arm Shaft Kit

Parts Master K6147 Control Arm Shaft Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020

Parts Master K6098 Control Arm Shaft Kit

Parts Master K6098 Control Arm Shaft Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

Rare Parts RP15578 Control Arm Shaft Kit

Rare Parts RP15578 Control Arm Shaft Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020
  • Improves steering response
  • Complete kit for 1 arm
  • Heat treated steel bushings OR torsional rubber bushings
  • Reduces vibration

ACDelco 45J0002 Professional Front Lower Suspension Control Arm Shaft Kit with Hardware

ACDelco 45J0002 Professional Front Lower Suspension Control Arm Shaft Kit with Hardware
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • High-quality replacement for your worn original equipment
  • Provide ease of installation for customer convenience
  • Complete assembly to reduce installation time
  • Light-weight construction to meet application requirements

MAS CSK6147 Control Arm Shaft Kit

MAS CSK6147 Control Arm Shaft Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

Daewoo Nubira Control Arm Replacement

The official Daewoo service manual provides incomplete and incorrect instructions for removal and replacement of the front control arms. I present a step-by-step guide that works.

The Daewoo Nubira, a compact car sold in the United States from 2000 to 2002, starts getting noisy around 75,000 or 80,000 miles, due to worn-out, corroded ball joints, ruptured stabilizer link seals, and sometimes also due to worn-out tie rod ends. The ball joint is permanently fixed to a heavy steel bar which is in turn riveted to the control arm. The control arm must be removed in order to replace the ball joint. One may either remove the arm, drill out the rivets with a 12 mm bit, and replace the ball joint, or replace the entire assembly; Daewoo Motor America sells new control arms with riveted ball joints and pre-installed bushings. Replacing the joint only is less expensive by a factor of four; installing new control arm assemblies has the advantage of replacing what are perhaps the most heavily used bushings on the vehicle. Authorized Daewoo service centers tend to prefer the latter.

Daewoo makes the dealer service manual, with thorough, illustrated step-by-step instructions for most maintenance and repairs, available for purchase at a steep discount. This can be more useful in some cases than in others; the instructions for e.g. timing-belt replacement or, emissions diagnostics call for specialized widgets available only to dealers. I discovered that the instructions given in the dealer service manual for removal and installation of the control arm assembly are simply incorrect and that both disassembly and reassembly are impossible if they are followed to the letter. After struggling with the driver's side for far longer than the repair should have taken, I, largely through trial and error, came to a more thorough understanding of the procedure, and replacement of the passenger's side consequently took far less time.

The procedure presented below may apply in a general sense to all similarly configured McPherson strut suspensions, but some of the steps are likely unnecessary in repairing better-designed cars. The Suzuki Forenza, a rebadged version of the Daewoo Lacetti, may share some of its predecessors quirks; "your mileage may vary." Note that I am not a company mechanic; take my advice at your own risk.

Tools: A jack and stands, metric combination wrenches, socket wrenches, breaker bars, metric sockets, a small wood block, engineer hammer, rubber mallet, stiff wire, C-clamp. rotary cutoff tool, ball joint separator ("pickle fork").

20 mm--the same size used to remove the Nubira's oil drain plug--is the largest combination wrench needed for this repair. Sturdy half-inch drive sockets in 14 mm, 17 mm, and 19 mm are recommended for removing some bolts which are held extremely tightly and treated with thread locking compound. A three or four foot steel pipe which fits over the handle of a 1/2 inch drive breaker bar will come in handy.

Depending on your preference, have some Loctite or similar thread locking compound on hand, or buy two M12 and two M-15 hardened split-ring lock washers.

Parts: In addition to the replacement control arms or replacement ball joints and ball joint nuts and bolts, order two of the control arm-to-crossmember bolt (09103-12034), and two of the split sleeve (96300622). Check beforehand to see if your stabilizer links are not broken and if their rubber joint seals are still intact; order replacements if necessary. The control arm-to-crossmember bolt will be cut in the course of this repair. It is an M12 ISO fine (1.25 mm pitch) flange head bolt, grade 10.8, that is not usually stocked at hardware or auto parts stores. McMaster-Carr and my local fastener supplier both carry it, but it's more convenient to get it shipped with everything else, and just as cheap.

The Repair:

(1) Loosen the lug nuts on the front wheels. Raise the front of the vehicle (this has to be done one side at a time, which is in my opinion a design flaw) and support it with jack stands.

(2) Remove the wheel on the side on which the repair is to be done first.

(3) Remove the pinch bolt. If it is stuck, tap it out using the wood block and hammer, after having first removed the nut.

(4) Using the ball-joint separator and the hammer, separate the ball joint. The Daewoo manual calls for a lever press ("ball joint remover KM-507-B") not usually available to mere Daewoo owners, which appears to be able to separate the joint without tearing its seal. If you can find such a tool, use it. Otherwise, "pickle fork" style separators can be borrowed from the local auto parts store.

(5) Remove the control arm-to-crossmember nut.

(6) Remove the rear crossmember-to-body bolt. There is no associated nut; it is presumably welded in place or integral to the unit-body in this area. This is a difficult bolt to remove; the steel pipe may come in handy.

(7) Using a Dremel or die grinder, cut off as much of the control arm-to-crossmember bolt as possible. The engineer responsible for this portion of the car placed the bolt directly below the drive axle; and trying to remove it intact merely pushes it into the inner CV joint. The manual, usually good about having the mechanic remove obstructions, is written as though there is nothing in the way. Remove the top portion of the bolt, taking care not to dislodge the boot on the CV joint. (If this does happen, seal clamp kits are available over-the-counter at many auto parts stores.)

(8) Remove the brake line (and ABS sensor wire) from the strut assembly. Remove the brake caliper from the knuckle assembly and hang with a piece of stiff wire. (If working on the driver's side, there is a good "hole" in the wheel-well to the mechanic's left. Do not let the knuckle hang from the drive axle and tie rods; this may separate the tripot joint, causing hundreds of dollars (or hundreds of minutes) worth of damage.

(9) Remove the stabilizer link. Remove the bolts connecting the strut to the knuckle and hang the knuckle (from the spring) using a piece of stiff wire. The manual does not include this step, but it is very difficult to remove the control arm and impossible to put it back into place if it is not done.

(10) Remove the control arm. A split sleeve centers the M15 crossmember-to-body bolt in the rearmost of the two control arm bushings. This sleeve can get stuck in the bolt hole, consequently holding the whole assembly in place, during the removal process. It may be necessary to collapse it using a hammer and screwdriver if it cannot be pulled or pried free.

(11) If applicable, replace the ball joint (or bushings) on the control arm.

(12) Install the split sleeve in the new or refurbished control arm and install the control arm on the vehicle. Use one hand to lift the knuckle and the other to push the control arm into place, or have an assistant do one or the other. If the strut is in the way, have an assistant hold the knuckle, and remove the strut (without dropping it on the assistant) by loosening the two nuts holding it to the body. If no assistant is to be found, blocks or telephone books will do. The nuts are found underneath the hood, at the top of the wheelwell.

(13) Install but do not tighten the control arm-to-crossmember nut and bolt, this time with the nut on top and the bolt on bottom.

(14) Install but do not tighten the rear crossmember-to-body bolt.

(15) Re-install the strut on the vehicle, if necessary, and re-attach the strut to the knuckle. Do not tighten the nuts at the top of the strut until the strut is back on the knuckle. Re-install the stabilizer link.

(16) Connect the ball joint to the knuckle. If necessary, knock it with a rubber mallet or push it into place (gently) using a jack.

(17) Install and tighten the pinch bolt and nut. Tighten the control arm-to-crossmember nut and bolt and the rear crossmember-to-body bolt.

(18) Re-install the brake caliper, using a c-clamp to press the piston back, if necessary.

(19) Re-install the wheel.

(20) Repeat this process for the other side of the vehicle.

(21) Lower the vehicle, and take it to the shop for alignment.

If there are still creaks, other common sources are the strut mount bearing and the outer tie rod end. Replacement of both is discussed, more adequately than control arm service, in the Daewoo manual.

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