13 Best Automotive Performance Crank Trigger Kits

List Updated January 2021

Bestselling Automotive Performance Crank Trigger Kits in 2021


Moroso 60008 Ultra Series Crank Trigger Kit

Moroso 60008 Ultra Series Crank Trigger Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021
  • Moroso Crank Trigger Kit

MSD 8605 Crank Trigger Kit

MSD 8605 Crank Trigger Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021
  • Easy adjustments by turning a wrench
  • Easy to lock in place once positioned
  • Great for quick and reliable timing changes
  • Made from quality materials

MSD 8615 Crank Trigger Kit

MSD 8615 Crank Trigger Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021
  • Absolutely the most accurate way to trigger the ignition
  • The non-magnetic pickup cannot be false triggered
  • Powerful magnets are embedded in a billet aluminum trigger wheel
  • Kits feature special brackets and mounting hardware for a variety of engines

MSD 8600 Crank Trigger

MSD 8600 Crank Trigger
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021
  • Absolutely the most accurate way to trigger the ignition
  • The non-magnetic pickup cannot be false triggered
  • Powerful magnets are embedded in a billet aluminum trigger wheel
  • Kits feature special brackets and mounting hardware for a variety of engines

MSD 8640 Crank Trigger

MSD 8640 Crank Trigger
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021
  • Absolutely the most accurate way to trigger the ignition
  • The non-magnetic pickup cannot be false triggered
  • Powerful magnets are embedded in a billet aluminum trigger wheel
  • Kits feature special brackets and mounting hardware for a variety of engines

MSD 8610 Crank Trigger

MSD 8610 Crank Trigger
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021
  • Absolutely the most accurate way to trigger the ignition
  • The non-magnetic pickup cannot be false triggered
  • Powerful magnets are embedded in a billet aluminum trigger wheel
  • Kits feature special brackets and mounting hardware for a variety of engines

MSD 8644 Crank Trigger Kit

MSD 8644 Crank Trigger Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021
  • Absolutely the most accurate way to trigger the ignition
  • The non-magnetic pickup cannot be false triggered
  • Powerful magnets are embedded in a billet aluminum trigger wheel
  • Kits feature special brackets and mounting hardware for a variety of engines

Holley EFI 556-113 Crank Trigger Kit 36-1 Tooth For Use w/Holley EFI Incl. Custom 3 Wire/Ferrous Target/Hall Effect Sensor w/M12X1mm Threads Crank Trigger Kit

Holley EFI 556-113 Crank Trigger Kit 36-1 Tooth For Use w/Holley EFI Incl. Custom 3 Wire/Ferrous Target/Hall Effect Sensor w/M12X1mm Threads Crank Trigger Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021
  • Crank Trigger Kit; 36-1 Tooth; For Use w/Holley EFI; Not Legal For Sale Or Use In California On Any Pollution Controlled Vehicle;

MSD 8620 Crank Trigger

MSD 8620 Crank Trigger
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021
  • Absolutely the most accurate way to trigger the ignition
  • The non-magnetic pickup cannot be false triggered
  • Powerful magnets are embedded in a billet aluminum trigger wheel
  • Kits feature special brackets and mounting hardware for a variety of engines

MSD 86203 Crank Trigger Kit

MSD 86203 Crank Trigger Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021
  • Crank Trigger Kit; Fly. Magnet; Black;

MSD 84697 Billet Crank Trigger Distributor

MSD 84697 Billet Crank Trigger Distributor
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2021
  • CNC machined billet aluminum housing and Dupont Rynite base
  • Oversized polished steel shaft with a QPQ coating for friction reduction
  • Shaft is guided by a sealed ball bearing and an extra long sintered bushing
  • Special oil tract improves lubrication to the distributor and cam gear
  • O-ring seals can be added to modified blocks to improve oil pressure control

MSD 8276 Ignition Crank Trigger Pickup

MSD 8276 Ignition Crank Trigger Pickup
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2021
  • Designed and built in-house 3/4 In. x 16 In. x 2.25 In.
  • Completely potted
  • Pickup has built in strain relief at the wire connection
  • Proprietary bobbin and winding design
  • For use with MSD flying magnet crank

Manley 40180 Miracle Seal Epoxy Kit

Manley 40180 Miracle Seal Epoxy Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2021
  • Comes with full manufacturer warranty

Managing Migraine Pain

A throbbing head is no laughing matter: Learn to track pain triggers to manage the mean agony of a migraine.

According to MayoClinic.com, 17 percent of women and 6 percent of men "have experienced a migraine." It doesn't take into account that many are repeat victims of this nasty, searing pain.

As a woman who experiences migraines, I've done a lot of research (nothing like personal motivation to kick in that yen to become an armchair expert). I'm not a doctor or a scientist, but over the years I have badgered my doctor, scoured the Web for advice (trying to stick to the medical sites) and looked into natural remedies. Because when you're hurting, you want to banish the pain and prevent it from returning.

Women definitely are more prone to migraines - three times more likely - and hormonal changes play a role. There don't seem to be any clear answers yet on how hormones are connected to headaches, but estrogen fluctuations appear to be the guilty culprits, according to Mayo Clinic research. A lot of women, myself included, find the days before and early into their periods to be especially tenuous. The Mayo Clinic's Web site says this is when estrogen levels drop, and as a consequence, pregnant or menopausal women can get migraines, too.

With that knowledge in mind, ladies who suffer migraines in time with their menstrual cycle would benefit from keeping a diary of when their times of the month occur and try and try to identify a pattern (if there is one), so they can be prepared. (Period's due on or around the 10th? Keep sunglasses in purse and extra pain medications on hand, just in case).

A diary is also good for tracking what you eating and if there is pain. Keep a journal, and note what you eat, even what activities you do, what time of the month it is (if you're a lady), and if you suffer and how much. I started noting what I was eating and drinking, and found out that soda pop with artificial sweeteners made my head throb. A day after a couple bites of dark chocolate, I'd find myself in agony. So now I drink more water, iced tea or club soda with a splash of fruit juice. Dark chocolate is verboten. Two dietary triggers down.

In keeping track, ask your doctor or search online for potential triggers. Virtually any medical Web site or pamphlet or magazine article addressing migraines will tell you which foods and drinks can be red flags, including:

• Alcohol (especially beer and red wine).

• Aged cheeses.

• Chocolate.

• Artificial sweeteners (Aspartame gets named a lot), but I've suffered headaches after ingesting splenda/sucralose, so be vigilant with record keeping.

• Highly processed foods (I am extra leery of anything with a nitrite in it.)

• Pickled, fermented and marinated foods.

• Too much caffeine (I'm still in denial about that one).

• Monosodium glutamate (so ask when you get Chinese takeout and read labels!)

• Certain seasonings (I've read that citrus can be a trigger, but have ruled that one out for myself. Everyone is unique.)

• Skipping meals or fasting is said to be bad for migraine and headache sufferers.

Besides food and drink, stress is another cause of migraines. MayoClinic.com says, "a hard week at work followed by relaxation may lead to a weekend migraine." But they also note that stress at work or home can be a trigger.

I'd tie this in to another frequently noted cause, and that is an irregular sleep cycle. If you get up every day at 6 a.m. and sleep in on Saturdays until noon, you could be asking for a migraine. Not enough sleep can become painful, too.

Another source of stress is sensory stimuli. Bright sunlight, strong glares and unusual smells - perfume, flowers, chemicals, secondhand smoke - can all trigger pain. Everyone is unique. Tear out the perfume samples in magazines if they cause headaches. If you know you're going to be miserable at high noon on a summer day, consider a hat and sunglasses if you must get out; otherwise, stay inside until the sun isn't so intense. It's smart to do so anyways, to lessen the risk of deadly and aging UV rays.

Changes in environment, such as the weather, season, altitude and barometric pressure are also listed as triggers on MayoClinic.com.

If you have a family history of headaches, you could be at greater risk. Keep that in mind if you're inclined to reach for the aspirin more often. Maybe Aunt Judy and Grandma Smith suffered migraines. If so, you're more likely to be a candidate.

Now if you have migraines, you're not out of luck. There are a lot of good medications out there that really help. They're not likely to cure you or your bank account, since they can be quite costly. But there are a lot of advancements being made. Talk to your doctor, and you might be prescribed a daily dose of something to prevent the onslaught of headaches, or you might get pills targeted directly at battling migraines. And if you feel that onset of pain that feels like a migraine coming on, medicate fast. The quicker you take your pill, the faster it works. And even though the pills can be costly, some would consider it worth the money to have the aches cut short after an hour or two versus hurting all day or all weekend.

On a more natural track, there are options out there as well. Herbs such as lavender are touted as being good at relieving headaches, and in health food stores you can often find topical salves in sold in tubes, often purse or pocket sized, that contain extracts of menthol (mint), lavender and other herbs that are soothing. They cost no more than a couple high-end lattes, and a dab on the temples can sometimes lead to cooling relief. Not always, but when it works, it's more than welcome.

Other natural remedies include herbs such as feverfew. Some books say it's good for headaches and migraines, while other sources say it helps ease the nausea that come with migraines. Again, everyone is unique. It might be one person's silver bullet, and snake oil for the next.

Natural Health magazine, in its April 2020 issue ("6 Ways to Manage Migraines"), mentions Ayurveda, India's traditional medical system. The article says that digestion plays a big role in chronic headaches, and practitioners therefore advocate detoxification. To help detox, they suggest a daily tea with herbs such as slippery elm, marshmallow and licorice (all three of which happen to be in Traditional Medicinals' Throat Coat tea). Drinking this is supposed to help lubricate and cleanse the intestinal lining. And to clean out the lymphatic system, they suggest sipping hot water every 15 minutes for 2 weeks.

Natural Health and other sources also suggest acupuncture as a migraine aid, saying the pressure points the needles stimulate act similarly to some anti-migraine drugs. Also noted in the article: The helpful effects of acupuncture stay in the system much longer than a pill.

Natural Health suggests other routes to pain relief, including massage to help you relax or improve blood flow. Craniosacral therapy is where a practitioner helps adjust the head and neck to ease pressure and get the fluid that nourishes the brain and spinal cord flowing freely again, leading to potentially less pain. And there's biofeedback, where you learn to manage stress, for example, and in a sense, heal your headache in a case of mind over matter.

No matter what you do to manage migraine pain, keep in mind that knowledge is power. Note what you eat and drink to eliminate potential triggers. Keep an eye to the sky to learn if bright sunlight is your brain's bane, and if it's tied to hormones, be prepared with any prescription or natural remedy that might help. There's no cure for migraines, but there is plenty of help out there. Start with a pen and paper.

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