13 Best Audiology & Speech Pathology

List Updated July 2020

Bestselling Audiology & Speech Pathology in 2020


Professional Issues in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Professional Issues in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Professional Writing in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Professional Writing in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020

Neuroanatomy for Speech Language Pathology and Audiology

Neuroanatomy for Speech Language Pathology and Audiology
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • neuroanatomy, matthew rouse

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Speech-language Pathology and Audiology: Evidence-based Education

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Speech-language Pathology and Audiology: Evidence-based Education
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020

Study Guide/Workbook to Accompany Speech and Hearing Science Anatomy and Physiology

Study Guide/Workbook to Accompany Speech and Hearing Science Anatomy and Physiology
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Treatment Resource Manual for Speech Language Pathology (with Student Web Site Printed Access Card)

Treatment Resource Manual for Speech Language Pathology (with Student Web Site Printed Access Card)
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • Cengage Learning

Applied Anatomy and Physiology for Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Applied Anatomy and Physiology for Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Clinical Research Methods in Speech-language Pathology And Audiology

Clinical Research Methods in Speech-language Pathology And Audiology
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

An Advanced Review of Speech-Language Pathology: Preparation for Praxis and Comprehensive Examination

An Advanced Review of Speech-Language Pathology: Preparation for Praxis and Comprehensive Examination
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Clinical Research Methods in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Clinical Research Methods in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Medical Speech-Language Pathology: A Practitioner's Guide

Medical Speech-Language Pathology: A Practitioner's Guide
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020

Professional Communication in Speech-Language Pathology How to Write, Talk, and Act Like a Clinician, Third Edition

Professional Communication in Speech-Language Pathology How to Write, Talk, and Act Like a Clinician, Third Edition
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020

Speech Correction: An Introduction to Speech Pathology and Audiology (9th Edition)

Speech Correction: An Introduction to Speech Pathology and Audiology (9th Edition)
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020

Increasing Language Development in Deaf Children

You don't have to be a speech pathologist or a specialist in hearing habilitation to help your deaf child learn language!

First, eye contact with your child is essential. The importance of eye contact is obvious when using sign language, but it is equally important for auditory communication or a combination of the two. The child must be aware that you are communicating with him or her in order to learn from your use of language.

Second, children learn vocabulary best when they are discussing something shared with the communication partner, such as an object both can see or an event both experience. This type of interaction is called 'joint attention,' since they are attending to the same object or event. Early language learning focuses on naming objects, so make sure your child is looking at the object by pointing to the object or, preferably, placing your hand on the object. Once joint attention has been established, you can go on to discuss the name and characteristics of the object. Joint attention continues to be important as children learn more sophisticated words such as verbs, adjectives, adverbs, and prepositions. For example, you might say "I saw you put the book on the table" to describe the child's actions using a preposition.

This leads to my third guideline - as much as possible, follow your child's lead. Discuss what the child is looking at or doing already. Although sometimes it's necessary to draw attention to other objects or actions, it is much easier, and more effective for language development, to focus on what the child is attending to at that moment.

Finally, try to limit instructions or directions when interacting if your purpose is to develop language. Of course, these statements, called directives, are frequently needed for behavior management. However, if a large proportion of your interaction with the child consists of directives, you are losing the language-learning value of joint attention. Research suggests that a consistently high percentage of directives will slow the development of vocabulary in particular and language skills in general.

You don't have to be a speech pathologist or a specialist in hearing habilitation to help your deaf child learn language! By employing the guidelines above, you will increase the amount of time you and your child spend discussing shared experiences, and as a result your child's language skills will improve steadily.