13 Best Asia Travel Magazines

List Updated July 2020

Bestselling Asia Travel Magazines in 2020


The Yeti Hunts: Travels Through Russia and Central Asia

The Yeti Hunts: Travels Through Russia and Central Asia
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

Travel + Leisure India & South Asia

Travel + Leisure India & South Asia
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020

Travel + Leisure Southeast Asia

Travel + Leisure Southeast Asia
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020

Lonely Planet Bangkok (Travel Guide)

Lonely Planet Bangkok (Travel Guide)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • Lonely Planet

Far and Away: Reporting from the Brink of Change

Far and Away: Reporting from the Brink of Change
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

Ocean Magazine Girls' Guide to Bali (Ocean Magazine: Girls' Guide to Travel)

Ocean Magazine Girls' Guide to Bali (Ocean Magazine: Girls' Guide to Travel)
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020

China National Travel (Chinese Edition)

China National Travel (Chinese Edition)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

Tokyo Ramen Perfect Guidebook

Tokyo Ramen Perfect Guidebook
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

Asian Sex Magazine - The world's #1 interracial love and sex quarterly - Issue 3, Jan 2013

Asian Sex Magazine - The world's #1 interracial love and sex quarterly - Issue 3, Jan 2013
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020

Tokyo Tonkotsu Ramen -The Best-

Tokyo Tonkotsu Ramen -The Best-
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

The Rough Guide to India (Rough Guides)

The Rough Guide to India (Rough Guides)
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020
  • Rough Guides

Scuba Diver

Scuba Diver
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2020

Warrior Odyssey: The Travels of a Martial Artist Through Asia

Warrior Odyssey: The Travels of a Martial Artist Through Asia
BESTSELLER NO. 13 in 2020

Adventures in Film Making

Making a horror movie is much like trying out an elaborate recipe for which you only have vague instructions that could go either way.

With a small production, everyone has to pretty much do everything that's always listed in the increasingly long credits at the end of every movie. Just because you're the "producer" doesn't mean you won't be cooking for the cast and crew, holding the boom, throwing a bloody head back and forth in front of the camera, and of course, cleaning up after the cast and crew both on the set and off. Then, of course, everyone has ideas on how to make things "better" or "easier". In the beginning, you listen to the ideas, and agree or disagree with varying degrees of sincerity. As the end of filming starts to draw near, you just want to finish as quickly as possible, so you tend not to listen to them at all and pretty much interrupt everything they say with "okay, quiet on the set!" whenever possible. Sure, it's an abuse of power, but when you're nearing the end and it's the ninth, tenth or eleventh hour of filming, molly-coddling actors isn't really your top priority. Sleep, however? Number one with a bullet.

The one good thing about working on a small production is that people seem to understand that while we are working with a (very) limited budget, we're still trying to make the best movie we can. To that end, we'll do 15 takes of the same 2 page scene, or somehow convince the lead actress to take bites from an attack dog, or have another actor dive headfirst into a 5-gallon drum full of water, soap, grit, and fake blood. Since everyone is investing so much time and effort into it, they'll actually do all of these things for you with a minimal amount of complaint, just to make the movie look good so that we all have a chance of gaining from this in experience and hopefully furthering careers.

The biggest part in making the movie look good is the special effects team. They're the ones who are making molds of the actors, putting together prosthetics, using makeup and copious amounts of fake blood on all the actors. They are also, inevitably, the ones who will make the biggest mess during the production. They'll come up with great ideas on how to make things look better, and come up with the idea of using different materials, and maybe doing things they wouldn't think of doing in their own homes. So, when you the door to your home, the smoke billows out and the noxious smell of sulfur is enough to knock you off of your feet. As you walk further inside, there it is: one of the special effects guys cooking roma plastilina clay on your stove. You briefly wonder how he can stand next to the stove all that time, then you remember that your poor cat is in the house as well and hope that he's not dead. Luckily, he's not; if he had been, they probably would have tried to use his lifeless body as a prop.

While not everyone shooting a movie on DV is going to end up the next Kevin Smith (he actually got the money to pay back his maxed out credit cards, didn't he?), the filmmaking process itself is an eye-opening look at how you handle people, pressure, and the non-stop headache that comes along with it. It's a test of character, of relationships, and also of self and just how much determination you have to see something through to the end. At the end of the day, as long as you can safely say you've made a movie and have a quality film to show everyone (quality, of course, being a relative term), then that's all that matters.

Unless you find distribution and make millions; but more on that next time.

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